The 22 Magazine


Marcus Kenney at Florida Mining Gallery
October 16, 2013, 10:40 pm
Filed under: ART, COLLAGE, EVENTS, SCULPTURE | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

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SHOW AT FLORIDA MINING GALLERY



HOW TO READ A NOVELIST and GOODBYE TO ALL THAT at Powerhouse

Two terrific events coming up at Powerhouse arena focusing on writing, living, and interacting as a writer in New York and the world….

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GOODBYE TO ALL THAT edited by Sari Botton
Tuesday Oct 08, 2013

In Goodbye to All That: Writers on Loving and Leaving New York, edited by Sari Botton, 28 women writers take up Didion’s literary legacy by sharing their own stories about New York. With stellar contributions from some of today’s most beloved female authors of memoir and literary fiction—Cheryl Strayed, Dani Shapiro, Emma Straub, Emily Gould, Emily St. John Mandel, Hope Edelman, and more—Goodbye to All That tells the stories of their own love/hate relationships with New York, as well as the city’s gravitational pull on them—even at the worst of times.

HOW TO READ A NOVELIST by John Freeman
Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Between 2000 and 2013 John Freeman put interviews to tape with just about every major writer who published a book: he spoke with such departed legends as Norman Mailer and David Foster Wallace; the Nobel laureates Doris Lessing, Mo Yan, and Günter Grass; bestsellers such as Amy Tan and John Irving; American greats from Toni Morrison to Philip Roth; and a younger generation of novelists that includes Dave Eggers, David Mitchell, Kiran Desai, and Jonathan Safran Foer. How to Read a Novelist rounds up 55 of Freeman’s very best profiles and interviews, but it is not simply a collection of discrete dialogues between interviewer and interviewee; these authors are also in conversation with one another, with Freeman serving as a deft moderator connecting the dots of a global literary culture. And in the poignant introduction about Freeman’s experiences interviewing John Updike, he gets to the heart of his enterprise: what it means to love a writer, to attempt to live up to his or her achievements—and then to come face to face with him or her in less-than-ideal circumstances.



Barbara Takenaga: New Paintings
October 3, 2013, 11:09 pm
Filed under: ART, EVENTS, PAINTING | Tags: , , , , , , ,

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SHOW AT DC MOORE 



Arcadia Contemporary: Small Works Show

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WEBSITE



Thanksgiving.
November 21, 2012, 4:26 pm
Filed under: EVENTS, HOLIDAYS | Tags: , , , , ,

The 22 folks will be busy the next two days expanding their waistlines, and we’re giving them the days off to focus on this noble gastronomic endeavor.

We’ll be returning Friday with Video Weekend, and a special short version of The Week/Weekend. Enjoy your holidays and THANK YOU for being faithful readers and supporters of The 22.



Exploring the Poison Cauldron Poison Cauldron of Newtown Creek with Atlas Obscura.
August 25, 2012, 4:41 pm
Filed under: EVENTS, REVIEWS | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

By Cat Gilbert

This morning, I joined in on the walking tour held by Atlas Obscura titled “Exploring the Poison Cauldron of Newtown Creek,” the infamous polluted waterway separating Brooklyn from Queens. Starting with a good bit of history, tour guide, activist, and resident Newtown Creek “historian” Mitch Waxman, gave an in-depth look at oil companies in Brooklyn (often referring to John D. Rockefeller, the man behind Standard Oil, as “the monster,”) and traveling the gauntlet of the many spills, explosions, and fires that have ravaged the area. As history passed into present day, so we passed through the back alleys of the oil and waste transfer zone. It was clear, tours were not a normal thing here. In fact, people, in general were not a normal thing. Passing truck drivers leered and then quickly gunned passed. At several points, Mitch paused to give us instructions about what to do if someone started to come after us. Luckily, we passed through with little trouble, sometimes even hailed with a smile and a “Welcome!” The workers seemed friendly enough, even if the landscape itself, was hellish. Peering out from a clearing onto Newtown Creek, Mitch points out the homeless people living in the giant abandoned industrial structure across the river in Queens, and talks about the quantity of bodies littering this waterway. What’s funny, Mitch notes, is Newtown Creek used to be where people visiting Calvary cemetary would come to get out of the industrial hellscape of 1800’s Manhattan. This used to be the country.

Passing from the oil zone to the “recycling” zone seated directly under the Kosciuszko Bridge, was like entering a portal into a dystopian nightmare. Everything was metal, barren, sparks and flames flew out from behind recycled sheet metal walls, the smell was at times, unbearable, and the sound, a loud metallic pounding. This is 24/7 Mitch reminds us, it never stops. Once in a while you had to look out for things like dead cats littering the dirt pathways, already blanketed with trash. Mitch mentioned he had a beer with one of the waste workers the night before to prepare for the tour and when he asked what we can do to help in regards to recycling, the worker’s answer was simple and chilling, “It’s to late. All you can do now is keep recycling and try to make it better for your children.” As we continued towards the end of Meeker ave, Mitch pointed out the homeless camp that inhabited the stretch underneath the bridge, one of the largest in New York.

Entering the coolness of McGorlick park, surrounded by coffee shops and dog salons, we are reminded “This entire tour, even now, we haven’t been more than 8 blocks from Newtown Creek.” Beadel street, where a one bedroom is priced at around $1600, runs directly through the heart of Newtown Creek, and it’s tree-lined tranquility, is truly disturbing in the face of the hostility that surrounds it. Admittedly, it’s easy to forget what surrounds us only blocks away but after this tour, I don’t think there is any way to wipe the memory of what’s there or what exactly our children will be inheriting. It’s encouraging to know people like Mitch are taking the time to educate both residents and visitors to New York. His approach, tempered by a very clear understanding that these industries are important and vital to New York and the community, is to make changes that allow the industry to continue without poisoning the surrounding residents. As Mitch wrapped up the tour he reminded everyone that the Newtown Creek Alliance offers public meetings, to work towards raising money and taking action against things like illegal dumping in the river and much more. Riverkeeper also plays a vital role in this process, and will be having an upcoming beach cleanup in Red Hook. For more information visit. To see more of Obscura’s tours visit their website or sign up for the mailing list.

 



Underpinnings at House of Yes.

House of Yes‘ recent fine art and performance art showcase, “Underpinnings” curated by Lauren Xandra and Rusty Van Riper focused loosely around the idea of “peeling” or multiple selves. The night was a success in many areas, including body control (choreography), preparedness, and flow of the night, while maintaining a heavy emphasis on dance and collaborative showcase. Highlights of the evening included “If Peeled…,” (choreographed and directed by Lauren Xandra) consisting of male and female dancers exploring the shapes and motions of bodies solo and en masse, followed by a perpetual motion chair piece performed by Pam Weiss and Laura Alexander titled, “Rise and Fall” (choreographed by Charlotte Hendrickson), “R(o/a)m” (choreographed by Claire Baum) and the surprisingly funny final piece, “Self Love Next to You” which consisted of siblings (Carolyn Ellis, Andrew Ellis) having a mock spat at the dinner table, complete with on tempo knife and fork fight. Take a look at some photos from the night below and see more here.




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