The 22 Magazine


An Interview with Adam Niklewicz.
July 31, 2012, 11:06 pm
Filed under: ART, INTERVIEWS | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

by Jade French

Adam Niklewicz plays with the relationship between identity and nationality with a slice of sausage in the middle. Removing our typical relationship with food (eat and run) Niklewicz forces the viewer to reimagine how we can view food with everything from beautifully rotating chicken bones to musical sausages! His sculptures are multi-faceted creations which resituate objects outside of their normal habitats. We caught up with the artist to find out more…

Jade French: How does your relationship with both Poland and America inform your work?

Adam Nikelwicz: On one hand, there’s the visual vocabulary of my Polish childhood, on the other – the American pop-cultural and commercial iconography. The two clash and blend together (there’s a bit of smoke) and all this occasionally produces some creative leaven.

JF: Do you think through creating art you gain a sense of identity? Or does art incorporate a universal feeling, which negates nationality?

AN: I’d dread to hear that my art is somehow ethnic, hermetic or obscure. True, I often base it on quirky, ethnic, folkish facts but I do hope I’m able to distill these facts into works with universal appeal.

JF: Can you explain more fully how ‘Romantycznosc is a reflection on the Polish psyche? How did you create that piece of work? Its amazing that the sound is so pitch perfect when made out of meat!

AN: It’s hard for me to explain the Polish psyche notion (other than through art itself), I know though it reaches its peak when a Pole plays a polonaise on the instrument. Putting this piece together took a lot of effort and a lot of sausage.  And there were these frequent (up to three times a day for a few weeks) visits to my local Polish deli, which confused the store clerk.  My appetite for always the same mundane kind of sausage, the shear amounts of the product purchased, the fact that I’d often produce a tape measure from my pocket to check on the sausage’s length before buying – all this made the clerk uneasy.  I fought against the instinct of explaining myself.  I decided that the explanation (I’m not really weird, I’m only making a musical instrument out of sausage) would not boost my image with the man. In other words, I enjoyed the process and misperceptions it produced.  The process has recurred several times since with other projects.  What makes the piece utter the right kind of sound must remain a secret.

JF: One thing that strikes me is the manipulation of found objects into functioning equipment- like the Art Forum kaleidoscope. How important is it that your art has a function, as well as an aesthetic value?

AN: I want my work to both look good and to possess content.  Yes, I need my objects to function, but their purpose must not adhere to an easy logic.

JF: Is the Art Forum piece a comment on art journalism? I noticed you cut the visuals from the review sections out- how much do art reviews affect an artist?

AN: Perhaps it’s a comment on the nature of art.  I truly believe that art is ever-changing (like the kaleidoscope effect used here) and ever-fresh (not unlike nature itself).

JF: Do you think using microscopic visuals forces the viewer to look harder at your artwork, or engages them in a different way?

AN: A small object of art feels precious, like a piece of jewelry. I noticed that people gladly focus their attention on a small work. They feel encouraged to wrap their minds around it.

JF: Would you classify your work as playful?

AN: I’m very happy when someone calls my work playful.  I’m equally happy when viewers find it humorous.

JF: Pieces such as Ounce have a strong sense of nostalgia and poignancy- does this piece relate directly to personal experiences?

AN: I love that you misspelled the title of this piece!  The actual title – ONUCE, stands for a garment of sorts – two pieces of fabric or paper (often a newspaper) designated to be wrapped around feet, usually in addition to socks.  All this for an extra protection against cold.  I suspect the term made the title partially because it looked like a misspelled English word (e.g. ONCE, OUNCE).  I used to wear onuce as a child.  Big time!

JF: Pieces such as Calle Lunga’ and Monument to Borscht, although stationary, seem to incorporate a sense of movement- is that something you recognize yourself?

AN: These two pieces are not really built to last.  They appear to face the imminent prospect of collapsing, breaking, sagging. I think, this is where the sense of movement comes from; their fragile nature implies change and change is related to movement.

JF: The kinetic sculpture Chicken Souphas a sense of frailty to it – what do you think this piece is trying to say?

AN: I like fantasizing about that chicken I consumed. I assembled its bones in a rather aerial manner.  I wonder- is this transformed bird on the verge of taking off?

JF: Why is there a link between food and heritage within your work?

AN: Food is a visible, tactile, sensuous (and surprisingly meaningful) way of experiencing a cultural heritage.

JF: I also read that you ate paint as an art student, which relates to the piece of bread with orange oil paint – can you tell us the story and why you recreated this moment later in life?

AN: The incident happened many years ago during a drinking party of a bunch of 17-year old art students – all ready, perhaps even certain, to conquer the artworld.  In my own drunken stupor, I spread orange oil paint over a slice of bread and challenged everyone to take a bite.  Nobody did!  Meanwhile, I put myself on the spot and now I had to have a good chunk of the slice.  The long forgotten incident returned to me quite suddenly, and made me realize that the then display of adolescent stupidity was in fact an act of commitment. A vow. I’m the only participant of that gathering from he past that keeps making art.  I recreated that ‘action’ now to renew the old vows.

For more about Adam visit his website.



The back door.
May 29, 2012, 4:43 am
Filed under: POETRY, WRITING | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

By Erica Manolith.

I don’t understand,

your life.

The sick look by the back door,

porch screen, flapping in the wind.

You don’t seem to notice the human,

of the humans around you.

Perhaps this makes you vomit?

Where are your skills?

Where is your voice?

It’s a vapor,

it’s a screen in the wind,

it fades,

it aches,

it has nothing to say,

and from nothing,

there is born,

nothing.

 



Erica Manolith is a writer living in Northwestern Pennsylvania. She is currently finishing her degree in France, and is home for the summer writing poetry for sport.



Tiny Naked Men Riding on Small Feral Animals: Philippe Jarry.
March 8, 2012, 1:00 am
Filed under: ART | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

WEBSITE.
OTHER.

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The Weekend:Dec 2-4.
December 2, 2011, 8:55 pm
Filed under: THE WEEK/THE WEEKEND | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

FRIDAY:

TED BROOKLYN:
We’re living in what is commonly referred to as the “Information Age.” With the emergence of social networks, we build new communities by pressing the “Like” and “+1″ buttons and becoming fans. As we become increasingly interconnected with the Brooklyn community in these new ways, we find ourselves grasping for a new common ethos. In other words, we are striving to refine and define “better.” On December 2 at Brooklyn Bowl, we will address these issues with talks from the best and brightest minds of Brooklyn and beyond.

OPERA ON TAP/Roulette Sisters.
Opera is fun. Most people don’t seem to realize how much fun it really is. In order to prove it, Opera on Tap has taken its act to barrooms where they found out that beer on tap enhances the operatic experience. The company is made up of young singers and instrumentalists who relish the direct contact with audiences not inhibited in their reactions by the looming menace of giant chandelier.The Roulette Sisters have been turning heads and stopping traffic since forming in the cold winter of 2003. Noticing that their warm velvet harmonies and spicy hot licks were melting the snow outside, the sisters realized that they had started something not only weather-altering but soul-stirring as well. The sexy sisters play a hip-shaking blend of American country blues, traditional songs, popular tunes and old timey music from the first half of the 20th century. With Mamie Minch: resonator guitar, Meg Reichardt: electric guitar, Megan Burleyson: washboard, Karen Waltuch: viola.

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Bicentennial Parade 1976 by Maude Larke.

the band comes closer
until the clapping ladies
in their gaudy flowered dresses
and the beer-bellied men
can feel the drum
striking in their throats

a beat that is now hardly felt
by the silent wraiths
making their own unseen procession
on the village green

the farmer is there,
who harnessed his ox
and milked each cow
with his own hands
on clean gray mornings
the hymn writer
playing the pump organ
at the meeting house
on Sundays
the buckskinned savage
who opened the secrets
of the new land
to new minds
and set his home
in any valley

the carpenter
who knew each work in his shop
and shaped it with his sure hands

the mother who made soap and butter
and raised her children
and read them the bible by the fire
the pastor
who shook the walls
and spoke thunder,
who was listened to
understood
and believed

other shadows are also here.
a buffalo shakes his horns,
the flesh on his strong shoulders twitching,
watching calm-faced –
the mustang, mane flying,
writing its history in the dirt with its stamping hoof –

the eagle, who was taken from his home
and fastened by his back
to flags and emblems, and died there, starving

these spirits are now
shadows behind the shadows
on the village green
listening to the big brass bands
and the silence in the crowd’s memories
caused by the unawareness
in the rest of their minds.

they were once living words
nobility, simplicity,
charity, resourcefulness,
optimism, knowledge.
They weren’t invited
to this century.
They’re left
to watch the parade
from their view;
the view of
things forgotten,
left behind,
refused,
or ignored.








Maude Larke has come back to her own writing after years of ‘real’ work in the American, English and French university systems, analyzing others’ texts and films.  She has also returned to the classical music world as an ardent amateur, after fifteen years of piano and voice in her youth.  She has several short stories and poems, three novels, and two screenplays to offer so far.  Publications include Cyclamens and SwordsSketchbook and The Centrifugal Eye.



12SEPTEMBER2001 (Part 3 of 3) BY MIYOKO CAUBET.



memories, desires, dreams and fantasies the ingredients with which one builds their own story and self identity? This is the question from which the video “12september2001” was conceived. The passing images live in the mind of the narrator. His inner voice addresses two young women whom he sees in a house – imagined to be abandoned and destroyed – which they used to spend their summers together. He recalls memories and dreams, shares his nostalgia, and confesses his still vivid fantasies about them.

These images are a mix between the narrator’s memories, his fantasies and emotions, and his personal experience of historical events, all of which are constitutive elements of his identity.

Directed by Miyoko Caubet
Text written by Matthew Mowatt
narrated by Georges Vitek

Part 1
Part 2



12SEPTEMBER2001 (PART 2 OF 3) BY MIYOKO CAUBET.

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