The 22 Magazine


Dinks: The Accountant/Molly
October 1, 2013, 11:48 pm
Filed under: FILM/VIDEO | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

 

WEBSITE



Jason Limon
September 21, 2013, 1:48 am
Filed under: ART, PAINTING | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

7315085828_e5ee79d83e_b
WEBSITE



Jason Robert Bell
August 29, 2013, 10:45 am
Filed under: ART, PAINTING | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jason Robert Bell, Ziffbuff, 2008

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THE WEEK/WEEKEND: October 11-17.

LISA 2012 from Blind Escrow Productions on Vimeo.

LISA Conference 2012
Peter B Lewis Theater: The Guggenheim Museum

Tuesday, October 16, 2012 from 8:00 AM to 11:45 PM

LISA 2012 is the Leaders in Software and Art conference at the Guggenheim in New York City, Tuesday October 16th, 2012.  We’ll have keynote speeches from Laurie Anderson, pioneering electronic artist, and Scott Snibbe, creator of Bjork’s Biophilia App, and panels on crowdsourced and social media art and the popular generative art toolkits openFrameworks, Processing, Cinder and Max/MSP. If you work with or care about new media, technology and interactive art, there’s still time to buy a ticket. Come meet and get inspired by some of the top artists and art experts in the field.

Continue reading



THE WEEK/WEEKEND: September 28-October 4.

THE SECRET CITY (NEW YORK)
Sunday, September 30th
Dixon Place

  • Cabaret star, Justin Vivian Bond will sing for us
  • Chef Amanda Freitag will present the food offering.
  • Painter John Devaney will share his beautiful work, which captures the endless parade of life.
  • Brooklyn Express Drumline will energize with their rhythms.
  • Charlotte Booker will make a New York poem with the assembled crowd. We’ll play a game of New York trivia…

And, of course, there will be storytelling, live music, community, art and LOTS of clapping. What more could you want out of a Sunday morning? Come celebrate the city with us. Oh, and feel free to bring something tasty for the refreshment table!

WADE GUYTON OS
OCTOBER 4, 2012–JANUARY 13, 2013
The Whitney

Over the past decade, New York–based artist Wade Guyton (b. 1972) has pioneered a groundbreaking body of work that explores our changing relationships to images and artworks through the use of common digital technologies, such as the desktop computer, scanner, and inkjet printer. Guyton’s purposeful misuse of these tools to make paintings and drawings results in beautiful accidents that relate to daily lives now punctuated by misprinted photos and blurred images on our phone and computer screens. Comprising more than eighty works dating from 1999 to the present, Guyton’s first midcareer survey features a dramatic, non-chronological design in which staggered rows of parallel walls confront the viewer like the layered pages of a book or stacked windows on a monitor. 

MI JU: GAIA
FREIGHT AND VOLUME
September 27 – November 3, 2012

The exhibition’s title Gaia refers to the Greek earth mother goddess as well as the scientific Gaia Principle, proposing that “all organisms and their inorganic surroundings on Earth are closely integrated to form a single and self-regulating complex system, to maintain the conditions for life on our planet” (James Lovelock). Mi explores the significance of Gaia pictorially, as it relates to today’s ecological challenges. In works such as One -as well as Wind and Water–the artist celebrates and pays homage to the elements in all their glory by examining both microcosms and macrocosms in nature. Mi deconstructs space in the manner of classic Asian landscape painting to present a floating menagerie of symbols – disembodied lanterns, birds, insects, dragons and other hybrid creatures, rich organic matter – looming up from the primordial void. Mi also employs radical shifts in scale and density, subtle hues juxtaposed with jarring color, fluctuating perspective and other dramatic methods to convey her otherworldly vision. Negative space is addressed lovingly and carefully, with as much and perhaps more import than actual objects.

Adam Rudolph – GO Organic Orchestra
Roulette
Monday, October 1, 2012 @ 8:00 pm

Unique in the realm of approaches to improvisational conducting, Go: Organic Orchestra utilizes a composed non-linear score consisting of sound and motion elements. These include tone rows, synthetic scales, melodies, linguistic shapes, intervallic patterns, textural gestures, modes, ragas, maqams, and plainchant. The score serves to provide material for both the improvisations and the orchestrations. Motion and forms and are generated through the application of the composer’s rhythm concept “Cyclic Verticalism” whereby polymeters are combined with additive rhythm cycles.

NY ART BOOK FAIR
September 30 to October 1, 2011
MoMA PS1

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 30 to October 1, 2011, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 29th. Free and open to the public, and featuring more than 200 exhibitors, the NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, contemporary art catalogs and monographs, art periodicals, and artist zines. Exhibitors include international presses, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, artists and independent publishers from twenty-one countries.

The Thrilling Adventure Hour featuring A staged show in the style of old-time radio with Paul F. Tompkins / Paget Brewster / John Hodgman / Busy Philipps / James Urbaniak

Martha Colburn : Camera, lights, charge, Pop!
Horton Gallery
Sep 28 – Nov 4, 2012

Horton Gallery is proud to announce Martha Colburn’s Camera, lights, charge, Pop! – opening Friday, September 28th in the gallery’s new, expanded Lower East Side location at 55-59 Chrystie Street. Marking the first time that her work has been seen in this capacity, the exhibition will feature an hour and a half program of about thirty manipulated found footage and stop animation films from the mid-1990s to the present as well as Polaroids and large-scale collages.

Collaborations with Marina Rosenfeld, Jason Lescalleet, Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus
Abrons Arts Center
Fri, September 28, 2012 – 8:00pm

The second evening of “Voices and Echoes” presents a series of unique collaborations including Otomo Yoshihide + Marina Rosenfeld duo, Gozo Yoshimasu + Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus trio, and Akio Suzuki + Jason Lescalleet duo.

Bob Log III
BABY SODA

SOMNAMBULISTS/DIMENSIONS/ROOTLESS
Felipe Jesus Consalvos: EXPLODED WHIMS
Vincent Castiglia @Sacred Gallery
LUZ at LaMama
AdA – Author Directing Author
Your Land/My Land
Brooklyn Commons: Martha Rosler and Michael Arcega
CHAPTER 2: PLACES
Pierce Warnecke + Richard Garret
Slow Boys – Michael Lowenstern and Todd Reynolds
Show #8: Forced Collaboration
Yarn/Wire
Lighthouse / Lightning Rod and Griot New York (excerpts)
Gasland Screening with Council Member Stephen Levin
Carver Audain (Jerome Commission) // Composers Inside Electronics (John Driscoll, Tom Hamilton and Doug Van Nort)
World Maker Faire New York
KERSTIN BRÄTSCH
“THERE WAS A TIME WE WERE PRESENT” WORKS BY DAN SABAU
2011 Digital/Electronic Arts NYFA Fellows Exhibit
Wild Leaves/Nathan Xander
Melanie Daniel: Artist Talk
THE END TIMES CABARET: THE LAST DAYS OF DISCO
BUSHWICK BOUNCE
VASKAKAS
Art & Law Residency Exhibition 2012
gozoCine: Works by Gozo Yoshimasu
Sonagi Project: Barame Soop
How Can Art Affect Political Change?
Macular Degeneration Reception and Listening Party
My Favourite Things
PARTY HEADQUARTERS – ART IN THE AGE OF POLITICAL ABSURDITY

COMING UP:

Rhinoceros
A Postcard from New Yorkshire New works by Doktor A.
8th Annual AQUAEFEST
Carnival Des Corbeaux
The Para-Architectural Imagination of Gustav Klutsis
Devin Powers, “Paintings”
SAM FALLS: BOOK AND SHOW

Paris Commune
Local Report 2012

Adults in the Dark: Avant-Garde Animation (MAD)
The Mountain Goats
THIRD ANNUAL BRING TO LIGHT: NUIT BLANCHE NEW YORK

WILLEM ANDERSSON at Nancy Margolis Gallery
THE HIVE
How to Break



An interview with Jason Bryant.
August 15, 2012, 2:29 pm
Filed under: ART, INTERVIEWS | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The 22 Magazine: So first the basics, where are you from, how did you end up in NY?

Jason Bryant: Well, I was born in Wilson, North Carolina. I was introduced to painting and drawing roughly when I was five and my love for art was immediate and without question. I was lucky enough to have people around me support this passion, to give me hope that the dream to be an artist can be a reality. Art was always a bright light that helped me get through a turbulent childhood. After getting my Masters from The Maryland Institute College of Art, my girlfriend at the time got a job in NY. Very reluctant and intimidated to move so quickly, the path was set for me to end up in NY.

The 22: Your bio says you are “heavily influenced by classic film,” tell me a little about that. Where did this love arise from? Who’s are some of your favorites?

JB: Film, to me, has always been an escape. Like painting, it sends us on a journey where we take what we bring into it, but always come out of the viewing process a little more informed and with a different perspective. There is something so elegant and clean about how black and white film translates to the viewer. It is very baseline and straight forward in its approach. Brando, Newman, and Grant are all some of my favorite actors. They were an actor’s actor, not afraid to take chances and capable of delivering powerful performances with effortless delivery.

The 22: Your upcoming show “Smoke and Mirrors,” from what I gathered, is meant to convey the trick of making something seem better than it is while simultaneously conveying its vulnerability? Why did you chose this topic? What relevance does it have for you or the  “stars” you portray?

JB: That’s exactly it. For “Smoke and Mirrors” I simply wanted to create a show with a double meaning. Every work in the exhibition is a painting based off a film still where the actor is either smoking or viewing their reflection in the mirror. I wanted to create a show where the paintings are beautiful and lavish, but once you read the title or look to see what is happening on the surface of these polished works, you start to see where there are “cracks in the faux finish.” I did not want to be overly dramatic in trying to convey the concept. I did not want to have paintings where the subjects were like pulling back their skin revealing all of their inner demons–nothing that dramatic and in your face.  I wanted the concept to come forward subtly while keeping with the conceptual “sleekness” of my paintings.

The 22: How does skateboarding culture fit into your artistic practice?

JB: I started skateboarding when I was 11. Skateboarding, like art, will be a lifelong love affair. It gave me an identity at a young age and it opened up my world to new ways of artistic expression. Most of all, it gave me lifelong friends who will always be like family. Since I can’t physically skate at the high level I once did, it’s fulfilling for me to bring skate graphics into my work and even paint directly on to skateboards like I’ve been doing the last couple of years. That is where the “Merging Icons” series was born. I wanted to merge iconic skate graphics with iconic film stills, basically combining the two most influential elements in my development as a person and as an artist. I love the effects and changes that my hand brings to the works, like I’m the instrument of combining two great passions. I’m actually working on a piece right now that will bring a third passion into the mix and I’m using a new medium. That’s all I can say at the moment!

The 22: Do you still skateboard?

JB: I still roll around, but at the age of 36, let’s just say I’m not going to go do a Tre-flip down eight stairs. Nowadays landing a kick-flip brings a smile to my face, but that is the point, it’s a joy that never goes away.

The 22: What is important to you about breaking the “frame” of a piece, painting directly on the wall?

JB: With the success of the “Merging Icons” I wanted to push the series forward to where the skate graphics would be breaking outside of the “frame” of the canvas and onto the wall. I got the opportunity to try it out at the Pulse Art Fair here in New York in May and this method will be a big part of “Smoke and Mirrors.” The graphics will be traveling all around the walls of the gallery creating a space in which the paintings and the graphics become the metaphorical “walls” of the environment in which the viewer has entered, bringing the viewer into the world of the paintings where each piece is connected to another through the graphics. The gallery agreed to shut down for a bit so I could do this, which is really great of them.

The 22: You talk about graffiti really brightening up the city in the winter. Are there are specific graffiti artists you admire? What about other painter’s?

JB: My approach is in some ways influenced by graffiti and how street art is used to engage the viewer with the mundane everyday structures we live around. I look at some street artists such as insa and r.o.a. Artists that influence my work are Damien Loeb, McDermott and McGough, Jeremy Fish, Kehinde Wiley, Marylyn Minter, Banks Violette. I do of course have my painting heroes such as Chuck Close and Barbara Kruger.

The 22: There’s one piece in your work that is really interesting, which looks like James Dean being arrested and has the tagline “What’s the matter  guys…didn’t you make your quota for the month?” How does this piece fit into your work? Is it a reflection on recent New York events?

JB: I had been developing three different bodies of work for the past four years that were shown in 2010 in a solo exhibition titled “Trilogy.” One piece which was the highlight of the show was a painting titled Paperwork and Quotas. It is a scene from The Wild One starring Marlon Brando. I simply recreated the film still, drawing and painting it in my normal style but then I added my own subtitles as a part of my “Text” series. I added subtitles that illustrated the film still but has a very contemporary meaning. The painting itself is the foundation trying to communicate struggles within any political system, not just law enforcement and how there is a “bottom line” in any profession that is at times unfair and unjust.

The 22: Another compelling piece is the “rainbows don’t mean shit” piece. What’s going on there?

JB: That piece is titled Happiness. The subject is a very elegant image of a woman staring off in sort of a daydream type of gaze. Her eyes are covered by a fun graphic of a rainbow bursting into the black and white picture plane. It seems to be a very fun and happy piece until you read the text “rainbows don’t mean shit” beneath the rainbow graphic. I simply wanted to have fun in sort of the sarcastic jaded way we view the world today. At the same time though it is commentating on one’s struggles in dealing with the “politics of a profession.” Maybe it is saying that a strong work ethic, talent, and integrity to how you approach your profession is not enough to fulfill a dream, especially not today. Maybe we have lost sight of those values.

The 22: Since so much of your work is based on counter-culture elements tell me how Porter Contemporary (as a Chelsea gallery) became the home for your work and what they offer to an artist like you.

JB: Although my work is based on counter-culture subjects balanced with elegant black and white cinematic imagery, at the core of my work is a foundation built upon a love for the history of painting. The works are highly technical and refined using a traditional approach to painting. This caught the eye of Porter Contemporary in 2006. They were a young gallery, having just opened, and I had lived in New York for just under a year. We have had a great working relationship because the gallery and my work have been able to grow together. The Gallery owner, Jessica Porter, has an incredible work ethic and integrity that is the backbone of the vision for her gallery. It is very inspirational to be around and it has been very exciting to watch the gallery grow along with my work. It is rare that a gallery and artist get to experience growing together with the same basic principles and a certain amount of integrity intact.

For more information about Jason Bryant and his upcoming show visit Porter Contemporary.
You can visit his Website at: http://jasonbryantpaintings.tumblr.com/



THE 22 MAGAZINE: VOLUME 3/III/THREE.

We are thrilled/charmed/humbled and just plain happy to present the 3rd volume of The 22 Magazine. To continue to support such amazing creative efforts in Brooklyn and the world and act as a collector of each contributors story is a role we never imagined we would have the luck to play.

We cannot thank enough all our contributors, interns, volunteers, funders, and everyone else who makes this magazine happen. It is with great honor that we present the contributors for Volume 3/III/Three of The 22 Magazine.

THE 22 MAGAZINE: VOLUME 3/III/THREE

Adam Void
Allison Sommers
Angeline Gragasin
Bradley Ehrsam
Charlotte Greenwood
Cless
Gerardo Mena
Iron Dog
Jason Stoneking
Jeff Tigchelaar
Jim Ford
J.J. Cromer
Joseph Daley
Megan Moncrief
Mike Bazzett
Nathan Vernau
Nick Lamia
Nicole Gordon
Penelope Gottlieb
Randy Mora
Ricky Allman
Sarah Boothroyd




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