THE WEEK/WEEKEND: Nov 9-14.

SANDY FUNDRAISERS:

GREENPOINTERS ONLINE RAFFLE
Brooklyn Relief: A night of words, music, and comedy to Benefit Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts

THE KITCHEN: FUNDRAISER
Fuck. Off. Sandy. // Vintage Crawl // Dog Masquerade
New Amsterdam Headquarters Fundraiser
Defiance: A Literary Benefit to Rebuild Red Hook
ROB DELANEY Benefit
FASHION ACTION AT HOUSING WORKS
SPIRITUAL LEADERS AND ELDERS | PRAYER | LIVE MUSIC | FOOD | HEALING
SANCTUARY | ARTISAN MARKET
BROOKLYN LOVES BROOKLYN
QMA ROCKAWAY FUNDRAISER
“Anything But Politics” – A Pop Culture Trivia Benefit for Hurricane Sandy Relief
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
ED OSBORNAlbedo Prospect

Party + Auction + Community = TLC for an Ailing DUMBO
FOOD EVENTS FROM GRUB ST
Bushwick Star Auction
HURRICANE SANDY FUNDRAISER WITH…NASS GNAWA

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The Week/Weekend: Sept 13-20.

Exhibition / “Harry Smith: String Figures”
300 Nevins St (Cabinet)
20 September – 3 November 2012

Cabinet is pleased to present “Harry Smith: String Figures,” an exhibition drawn from the collection of John Cohen. Organized by painter Terry Winters, the show features twenty-two string figures created by Smith (1923–1991), the legendary artist, filmmaker, and ethnomusicologist.

BROOKLYN BOOK FESTIVAL
Brooklyn Borough Hall and Plaza
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2012, 10am-6pm

On Sunday, September 23, 2012, from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m., a record 280+ top national and international authors and participants will join bibliophiles, booksellers and literary organizations on 14 stages at Brooklyn Borough Hall (209 Joralemon Street) and Plaza, Columbus Park, St. Francis College, Brooklyn Heights Public Library, Brooklyn Law School, the Brooklyn Historical Society and St. Ann & The Holy Trinity Church for the seventh annual Brooklyn Book Festival.

Michael Chabon @Greenlight
Sep 17 2012 7:30 pm
Greenlight Bookstore

In his first novel in five years, beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning and New York Times best-selling author Michael Chabon provides a kaleidoscopic vision of urban America in transition, as witnessed by two intimately intertwined families in Oakland, California. Telegraph Avenue encompasses race, family, sexuality, gentrification, politics, jazz, funk, comics, kung fu, and a talking parrot, all with dazzling style and deep compassion. Chabon will read from his novel and answer audience questions before signing books.

Date the Time – Molly Dilworth
Reception: September 20, 6-8pm
Recess

On August 17, 2012 Molly Dilworth will begin work on Date the Time, as part of Recess’s signature program, Session. Session invites artists to use Recess’s public space as studio, exhibition venue and grounds for experimentation. For Date the Time, Dilworth will create a series of banners and flags, bearing patterns generated from user-submitted photos. Addressing digital content using traditional folk art techniques, Dilworth will distill issues of labor and consumer rights from unexpected sources.

Wendy White: Pix Vää
Leo Koenig
Opens September 13 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

In the large-scale “Fotobild” paintings, White continues to conjoin component canvases and then secures commercial storefront awnings above and atop painted canvases. These awnings and armatures, fabricated at a sign shop in Chinatown, feature human-scale snapshots that White has culled from her digital and print archives.

Stealth Reflections
Mighty Tanaka
September 14

Stealth Reflections pulls back the layers of consciousness and exposes the viewer to an awakening of self reflection.  Through his work, Miguel Ovalle seeks to reveal the inner psyche of the human condition through a myriad of interpretations and techniques.  His steadfast approach defines his meticulous attention for detail.

Tessa Farmer & Amon Tobin Control Over Nature
Spencer Brownstone Gallery
September 15 – October 6, 2012

Spencer Brownstone Gallery is pleased to present ‘Control Over Nature’, an exhibition by Tessa Farmer in collaboration with an acoustical installation by Amon Tobin. For her second show at the gallery, Tessa has teamed up with Amon Tobin to mark his September 14th performance at New York City’s Hammerstein Ballroom. With his groundbreaking audio/visual live show ISAM 2.0, the electronic music pioneer joined forces with Farmer for an extraordinary collaborative installation combining his sound design and elements from ‘ISAM’, alongside Farmer’s trademark sculptures (constructed from bits of organic material, such as roots, dead insects and bones). Hovering with a rarefied, jewel-like beauty, Tessa’s tiny spectacles resound with a theurgist exotica: their specimen forms evolve as something alien and futuristic. The collaboration perfectly captures the themes surrounding ‘ISAM': sensory deprivation, disorienting situationism and the mechanization of natural things.

Wondering Around Wandering
Saturday, September 15, 6:00–11:00pm
983 Dean Street

Join us for the grand opening of Wondering Around Wandering, and don’t miss Pulled: A Catalog of Screenprinting, making its final stop after a year of traveling.


Fishtank Ensemble
/Baby Soda Jazz Band
Jalopy
Sat, Sept 15th

Fishtank Ensemble is a band that offers a unique blend of Gypsy, Balkan, Flamenco, Klezmer and original tunes. The arrangements are always surprising and include instruments from many countries such as violin, accordion, flamenco and gypsy jazz guitar, shamisen, bass, saw and voice./Baby Soda! Developed by hoboes, perfected through science… Baby Soda is on the cutting edge of a new movement loosely known as street jazz; with an eclectic set of influences ranging from New Orleans brass bands, jug music, southern gospel and hot jazz.

Who Gives a Sh*t About Literary Magazines?
Mon Sep 17, 7:00PM
BookCourt

Randy Rosenthal (editor of The Coffin Factory) and panelists Lorin Stein (editor of The Paris Review), Rob Spillman (editor of Tin House), and John Freeman (editor of Granta) discuss the impact of literary magazines in contemporary culture.

Survival
War of Words
Strange Tales of Liaozhai

Kris Bowers & Carson Adjacent
The NY Theremin Society Presents: GOOD Vibrations – Theremin X 4 FT Dorit Chrysler, Michael Evans, Rob Schwimmer and Allison Sniffin
Eleh (US Debut) + Lary 7
PRACTICE! W/ IKEBE SHAKEDOWN + OSEKRE AND THE LUCKY BASTARDS + THE FORTHRIGHTS + TUNDE ADEBIMBE/ OHAL GREITZER/ DAREN HO/ RYAN SAWYER/ C. SPENCER YEH QUINTET
Best American Poetry 2012
My Heart Is An Idiot: FOUND Magazine’s 10th Anniversary Tour!
LIGHT OBJECTS
MECANICA POPULAR
LIGHTNING BOLT
R. SIKORYAK & FRIENDS: CAROUSEL

The Channel
Joseph Keckler + Mac Wellman
ASBA’s 15th Annual International
NYC HONEY FESTIVAL
EatSleepDraw (5 Years)
Chris Watson + Marcus Davidson
AURAL DYSTOPIA
ALESSANDRO PESSOLI: FIRED PEOPLE
REYES & STEEL
Beth Cavener Stichter: Come Undone
Liza LaCroix
Masami Teraoka: Cloisters Inquisition    
Metropolis: Alexis Duque
Richard Estes / New York by Night
BARNEY KULOK: BUILDING
Ralph Humphrey
Assembly 2012
Sunday Paintings for a Rainy Day
Nate Wooley + Mazen Kerbaj
TAKESHI MURATA: SYNTHESIZERS
Crossing the Line 2012
Printed Matter, Inc. presents Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference in conjunction with The NY Art Book Fair
SHABOYGEN BY STEVEN AND WILLIAM LADD
Luisa Rabbia
INNER CIRCLE MUSIC FESTIVAL: PETROS KLAMPANIS TRIO
Wildlife in the Post-Natural Age
Thomas Hirschhorn “Concordia, Concordia”
ANDREA ZITTEL: Fluid Panel State
Alexander Hahn

Allison Evans
Sally Mann: Upon Reflection
POST NATURAL
Occupy Your BFF
Lucie Fontaine : Estate
New York School Artists
Respect Sextet and Loadbang
SIGHTLINES: HELEN SEAR
Opera on Tap: BRIDES ON FIRE!!!
Red Baraat w/ M.A.K.U. SoundSystem
Mount Eerie w/ Loren Connors

LIGHTNESS OF BEING
CARL MAGUIRE, FAR FROM ALMOST ALWAYS
Charles Jarboe   New Paintings
CALEB CAIN MARCUS: PORTRAIT OF ICE
FITZGERALD & STAPLETON: WAGE
Teresita Fernández & Mr.
HAIRY SANDS/SOURCE OF YELLOW
GUYI-GUYI by Pereferia Teatro
DAVE COLE
Miriam (BAM 30th Next Wave Fest)
BEAT FESTIVAL
Andra Ursuta: Aboveground Animation
Trey Speegle: Good Luck With That
THE JOSHUA LIGHT SHOW
Pictures from the Moon: A Symposium on Holograms and Art
MIVOS QUARTET
Nublu 10 Years w/ performances by Wax Poetic, Hess is More, Love Trio and Clark Gayton
Gallow Green

COMING UP:

The Secret City – NEW YORK
Cave Canem at The New School Presents: Natasha Trethaway and Metta Sama
Crossing the Line
Devotchka
The Mountain Goats
Adults in the Dark: Avant-Garde Animation (MAD)

THE WEEK/WEEKEND: MAY 10-17.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Stephen Hannock: Recent Paintings: Vistas with Text @Marlbourgh

Jacqueline De Jong’s Situationist Times, 1962-1967
http://boo-hooray.com/the-situationist-times/de-jong-situationist-times/
05/09/2012-05/25/2012
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Boo-Hooray is happy to announce an exhibition of original art, publications, photography, ephemera and manuscripts related to Jacqueline De Jong’s vanguard publication The Situationist Times, celebrating the 50th anniversary of its first issue. A total of six issues were published: Issue 1 in May of 1962, and the final issue in December of 1967. A seventh issue was compiled but not published. The Situationist movement produced periodicals: Internationale Situationniste (twelve issues published between 1958 and 1969) and the German Gruppe SPUR publication SPUR (six issues from August 1960 to August 1961). There were other examples: Drakabygget (Scandinavia), Heatwave (UK), Black Mask (USA), King Mob Echo (UK). Dutch artist and graphic designer Jacqueline de Jong joined the Situationist International in 1960. De Jong suggested the publication of an English language newsletter in November of 1960, to be co-edited with British Situationist Alexander Trocchi.

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THE WEEKEND: MARCH 9-11.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Holi
http://www.festivalofcolors.org/
03/11/2012-03/11/2012
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Holi is the Hindu festival of colors. It celebrates the coming of spring, fruitful harvests, unity, joy, and a tale from the Bhagavad Gita. In addition to the throwing of colored powder (Holi Gulal) it is traditional to light bonfires in celebration of the miraculous escape that young devotee of the god Vishnu. A demon tried to throw him into a fire, but he escaped without any injuries due to his unshakable devotion. In most areas, Holi lasts about two days. One of Holi’s biggest customs is the loosening strictness of social structures, which normally include age, sex, status, and caste. Holi closes the wide gaps between social classes and brings Hindus together. Together, the rich and poor, women and men, enjoy each other’s presence on this joyous day. Additionally, Holi lowers the strictness of social norms. No one expects the decorum of normal life; as a result, the atmosphere is filled with excitement and joy.

Hazmat Modine
http://hazmatmodine.com/home.html
03/10/2012-03/10/2012
7pm-10pm

HAZMAT MODINE draws from the rich soil of American music of the 20’s and 30’s through to the 50’s and early 60’s, blending elements of early Blues, Hokum Jugband, Swing, Klezmer, New Orleans R & B, and Jamaican Rocksteady. The band is fronted by two harmonicas which use call and response, harmony, melody, and syncopated interweaving rhythms. The band includes tuba, guitar, and percussion, claviola and Hawaiian steel guitar. The band’s sound reflects musical influences ranging from Avant-garde Jazz to Rockabilly and Western Swing to Middle-Eastern, African, and Hawaiian musical styles.

 

 

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THE WEEKEND: Oct 21-23nd.

FRIDAY:

UGLY ART ROOM PRESENTS: ALL THAT REMAINS

Mathilde Aubier, Paul Burgess, Cless, Virginia Echeverria, Fred Free, John Gall, James Gallagher, April Gertler, Ashkan Honarvar, Colin Jenkins, Gordon Magnin, Clarita Mata, Jeffery Meyer, Tom Moglu, Randy Mora, Julien Pacaud, Lilly Pereira, Dave Plunkert, Ciara Phelan, Eduardo Recife, Kareen Rizk, Javier Rodriguez, Valerie Roybal, Katherine Streeter, Leigh Wells, Charles Wilkin, Lionel Williams, Bill ZindelFrom its abstract roots in Cubism to the political and counter culture movements of Dada and Punk, collage has always been a product of its environment. With the rise of 24 hour media cycles, social networks and search engines, contemporary culture has effectively rendered print media obsolete, creating a virtual boom in discarded paper ephemera for collage artists to examine and reinvent. Through these discarded remnants collage artists have become the archivists and activists of this post modern age, paralleling the frenetic pace in which we live while exposing the voyeuristic and often disjointed nature of popular culture.INTERVIEW WITH THE 22.

Doomsday Film Festival
The 2011 Doomsday Film Festival explores our collective obsession with the Apocalypse in film, art, and culture.From raptures, plagues, meteorites, nuclear holocausts, aliens, zombie attacks, ecological catastrophe, and cybernetic revolt to the 2012 doomsday predictions, the Festival will touch upon all possible permutations of our collective demise. We’ll be screening films from across the board, with works ranging from premieres to established classics to rediscovered gems. On the schedule for the 2011 Festival are nuclear fallout cartoons, early ’60s atomic parables, ’80s zombie punk, award-winning independent shorts, and much more.The event will incorporate a panel-based symposium featuring authors, artists, and all manner of experts on the End of Days. We plan to tackle the Apocalypse in all its forms, and hope you’ll join us for the ride!

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THE WEEK: JUNE 1-3.

!Women Art Revolution SCREENING @ IFC.

This revelatory “secret history” illuminates the Feminist Art movement through interviews with and works by visionary artists, scholars and critics like Miranda July, The Guerrilla Girls, Yvonne Rainer, Judy Chicago, Marina Abramovic, Yoko Ono, Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, B. Ruby Rich, Ingrid Sischy and Carolee Schneemann. Score by Sleater-Kinney’s Carrie Brownstein.

In person appearances:
Wednesday, June 1: Lynn Hershman Leeson & Alexandra Chowaniec at 6:10pm, Leeson, Chowaniec, & Kathleen Hanna at 8:10pm
Thursday, June 2: Chowaniec & Howardena Pindell at 2:10pm, Chowaniec & Carolee Schneemann at 6:10pm, Chowaniec & J. Bob Alotta at 8:10pm
Friday, June 3: Chowaniec& Janine Antoni at 12:10pm, Chowaniec & Joyce Kozloff at 6:10pm, Chowaniec & Martha Wilson at 8:10pm
Saturday, June 4: Chowaniec & Howarden Pindell at 2:10pm, Chowaniec & B. Ruby Rich at 6:10pm, Chowaniec & Guerrilla Girls Frida Kahlo and Kathe Kollwitz at 8:10pm
Sunday, June 5: Chowaniec & Howardena Pindell at 2:10pm
Monday, June 6: Chowaniec & Carey Lovelace, Chowaniec & Connie Butler at 6:10pm
Tuesday, June 7: Chowaniec, Carey Lovelace & Faith Ringgold at 6:10pm

SCREENING TIMES.

GUERILLA GLEE CLUB (CLICK LINK FOR MORE INFO) (DATE CHANGED TO JUNE 2)


The Peripheterists
curated by Jocko Weyland

June 1 – July 30, 2011

Opening reception: Wed, June 1: 6-8 pm

Guided Tour: Wednesday, June 8: 6:30-8 pm
Music Event: Thursday, July 14: 7 pm

Featuring work by:
Nicole Andrews Brandes, Natascha Belt, Dave Bevan, Dwayne Boone, Gerardo Castillo, Rick Charnoski, Edward Colver, Ale Formenti, Renée French, Joseph Griffith, Thomas Hauser, Mark Hubbard, Chuckie Johnson, Gary Kachadourian, Taliah Lempert, Doug Magnuson, Alfredo Martinez, William McCurtin, Stu Mead, James Niehues, Gloria Park, Daniel Pineda, Randy Turner, Dennis Tyfus, Unidentified Cameroonian barbershop painters, Sereno Wilson, Jesse Wine, Jason Wright.

Tony Bennett unsuspectingly coined a new term of surprising relevance when he once said he liked what Oskar Kokoschka did “along the peripheter.” Though meaning the perimeter and periphery in the painting itself, he innocently zeroed in on a murky netherworld away from the formal where success and failure, acceptance and indifference, and Tony Bennett and Oskar Kokoschka meet. Like these two disparate personalities, the artists in The Peripheterists elude the standard definition of outsiders to form a diverse and unaligned but oddly complimentary non-scene that doesn’t really register with either the hoi polloi or the intelligentsia. In many cases low-key and unsung though prodigiously gifted, all are fairly unconcerned with and unknown in that rarely satisfying milieu known as “The Art World.”

The Peripherterists examines the wide-ranging connections, affinities, and allusions amongst works that posses the popular appeal often absent at the your typical white cube. That luck, social standing, ladder climbing, and a multitude of other variables determine who gets fêted is not news by any means, but it does give rise to an urge to address that vexing situation with a gathering of mostly uncelebrated rare birds. A few encounters amongst many will have Mark Hubbard’s fantastical diagrams for actual skateparks, Gloria T. Park’s expressionist wig designs, and Jim Nieuhues’ paintings that are the basis for ski area maps consorting with Sereno Wilson’s glittery Nubian goddesses, Nicole Andrews’ paper cutouts of ennui-suffused suburbanites, and Stu Mead’s poignant, troubling, and very funny depiction of sexually active adolescents. This is not a polemic but an excursion into parallel realm of wonderful art that combines the fiercely individualistic and unorthodox with the accessible, and brings up old-fashioned but eternal questions about what art is and why people bother.

Jocko Weyland is the author of The Answer is Never – A Skateboarder’s History of the World (Grove Press, 2002) and has written for Thrasher, The New York Times, Cabinet, Apartamento and other publications, and is also the creator of Elk magazine, books and gallery.

 Full Moon Storytelling Night: Folk Tales and Tellers From Guyana

Wednesday, June 1, 6:30-8:30pm
St. Stephen’s Church
East 28th St. and Newkirk Ave. (East Flatbush)


Moonlight Stories in the Garden (duppy (ghost) stories of the Caribbean and tales of the sea)

Thursday, June 2, 7-9pm
Prospect Heights Community Farm
256 St. Marks Avenue (Prospect Heights)

DIXON PLACE:
CHANGING SKINS: FOLKTALES ABOUT GENDER, IDENTITY AND HUMANITY
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 AT 7:30PM
& SCHISMISM: NATURAL LAW FRIDAY, JUNE 3 AT 9:30PM

SCHISMISM: NATURAL LAWCHANGING SKINS

SCHISMISM: NATURAL LAW: Lisa Karrer’s multi-media performance is inspired by the life of Charles Darwin. Karrer’s collaboration with composer and multi-instrumentalist, David Simons, features an arresting assortment of sonic and visual backdrops, including video sequences linked with original soundtracks, voice, triggered theremin, and live acoustic and electronic compositions. These combined elements illuminate an interwoven collection of concepts, associations and stories that mirror Darwin’s complex exploration of evolution and universal connectedness. In the spirit of natural selection, audience members choose the sequence of onstage events during the performance.

CHANGING SKINS: Compiled and performed by Milbre Burch and directed by Emily Rollie, featuring photographs from “Meta-Genesis,” (above) an exhibit of portraits of transgender folk by Columbia, MO-based photographer, Jane Lavender.Changing Skins interweaves gender-bending folktales from cultures spanning the globe with musings on the construction of gender and identity. Compelling storytelling for grownups!

Under Glass: A Victorian Obsession
An Illustrated Lecture and Show and Tell with Glass Parlor Dome Collector John Whiteknight

Date: Thursday, June 2nd
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $5
Part of the Out of the Cabinet: Tales of Strange Objects and the People Who Love Them Series, presented by Morbid Anatomy and Morbid Anatomy Scholar in Residence Evan Michelson

A smoking monkey dressed as a Marquis, a Wild West scalping scene created in beeswax, a cemetery scene made from the deceased’s hair, and stuffed pug dog puppies, all under glass domes!!!!!

The bell jar, or glass parlor dome, is synonymous with our memory of the Victorian Age (1837 – 1901). During the 19th century, these blown glass forms were referred to not as domes but as shades, and graced nearly every parlor, protecting a broad variety of treasures–including miniature tableaux, waxworks, natural history specimens, taxidermy of exotic birds and pets, automatons, and delicate arrangements of hairwork, featherwork, and shellwork–from dust and curious fingers. (READ MORE.)

MUSEUM OF (UN) NATURAL HISTORY featuring new works by KIM HOLLEMAN
Opening FRIDAY JUNE 3rd 6-10PM
65 Union Street  Brooklyn  NY

WORK Gallery is pleased to present Museum of (Un) Natural History featuring new sculptures and a street installation by artist Kim Holleman. The Museum is a collection of environments that have all been drastically physically and/or psychologically changed by human intervention. Using mostly synthetic materials, noxious chemicals, and items culled from the trash or found on the street, Holleman creates models of parks, empty lots, nostalgic structures and architectural futures. Each miniaturized landscape represents and critiques our consumptive habits and land use, the visual results of which are both fantastical and grim. Hazardous threats to the environment’s natural balance overwhelm the landscapes, leaving an eerie beauty in the wake of irreversible destruction.

In a truck lot adjacent to the Museum is Trailer Park: A Mobile Public Park, a “portable, natural, public park” inside an RV trailer. The interior is an actual park, where visitors go inside to go outside. Masonry paths, a waterfall, and the splendor of living shrubs, trees are ready for dispatch to wherever a green refuge is needed.


ASHES // JEREMY DYER || JUNE 2 // 6-9 PM @OCCULTER


OPENING RECEPTION
THURSDAY JUNE 2, 2011,  6-9PM
SOUND PERFORMANCE BY IAPETUS
RUNS THROUGH JULY 3

“I create fictional spaces that explore the intersection of memory, history and myth through the landscape-as-image. My method is to photograph, collect, deconstruct, and reassemble photographic material — collapsing multiple points in time and space into a single scene. This mirrors the fragmentation and flattening of experience as it occurs in the creation of memory while reflecting a sense of dislocation from place. As an atavistic response to the landscape, my images engage ‘land’ as a site of indifferent natural forces. Seen through a texture of skin, ash and the blackened fuzz of a violent guitar, each work is subsequently a nostalgic articulation of our histories, new histories made impossible by memory and mythology”. Jeremy Dyer lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

UPTOWN ART STROLL: INWOOD/WASHINGTON HEIGHTS

NoMAA is pleased to announce the arrival of the Uptown Arts Stroll 2011, the most anticipated annual community arts festival in Washington Heights and Inwood. The Stroll will showcase the outstanding painters, photographers, writers, musicians, actors, dancers, and other creative people and arts groups that are contributing to the cultural life of Northern Manhattan. These artists will exhibit and perform in local businesses and institutions, open spaces, parks and other local venues throughout the month of June.

This year, NoMAA is delighted to partner with the 12th Annual Carnaval del Boulevard, a celebration of Dominican & Latino culture produced by the Juan Pablo Duarte Foundation, The Malcolm X & Dr. Betty Shabazz Memorial and Educational Center, and the Washington Heights Business Improvement District, to kick-off the Stroll with a community celebration on Thursday, June 2nd, 6–8:30 p.m. at The Shabazz Center. On Saturday, June 4th, NoMAA and the Stroll will join El Carnaval del Boulevard and the Washington Heights BID from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. on St. Nicholas Avenue from 181st to 188th Sts., presenting art and performances from our local artists. read more »

KAREN J. REVIS: LUCID @ SEARS PEYTON GALLERY.

Fuse Works presents: Alarums and Excursions
At Front Room Gallery
Friday June 3, 2011, 7-9pm
open friday – sunday 1 pm to 6 pm
147 roebling street
williamsburg, brooklyn

an exhibition of multiples and prints including: Gregory Curry, Glen Einbinder, Ross Racine, Chuck Jones, Jody Hanson, Luca Bertolo, Andrew MacDonald, James Leonard, Celeste Fichter, Peter Feigenbaum, David Shapiro, Jan Obornik, Chiara Camoni, John O. Smith, Julia Whitney Barnes, Rik de Boe, Lotte Lindner and Till Steinbrenner, Sarah Vogwill, George Spencer, Emily Roz and Cammi ClimacoAlarums and Excursions is the sixth exhibition of multiples and prints by Fuse Works, an organization dedicated to exhibiting and promoting editioned artwork. The exhibition presents new work by 21 artist comprising prints, multiples, books, and digital works. (READ MORE.)

Japan Society presents
416 MINUTES
Thursday, June 2, 7:30 PM
333 East 47th Street

Join us for a surprise work-in-progress presentation of WaxFactory’s 416 MINUTES, featuring an extraordinary collaboration with artists from Japan and Eastern Europe, and inspired by the imagination of Haruki Murakami. In the company’s signature multidisciplinary style, this unsettling new work shadows an actress whose escape from a film studio sets her on a trail of chance encounters during the hours of the night when things take on a particularly eerie glow. Conceived and directed by Ivan Talijancic. Free Admission. Reception to follow.

TIX & MORE >>

SLOAN FINE ART, FRIDAY JUNE 3rd

Main Gallery: Aaron Smith “Coterie of the Wooly-Woofter”
Opening Reception: Friday, June 3rd, 6 to 8 pm
Exhibition: June 2 to 26, 2011

Project Room: Anthony Iacono “Victor Victoria”
Opening Reception: Friday, June 3rd, 6 to 8 pm
Exhibition: June 2 to 26, 2011

DAVID SANDLIN @ CENTRAL BOOKING, JUNE 3rd 6:30pm


Over the past 15 years, David Sandlin has produced eight major volumes (and several side works) of narratively connected artist’s books, collectively called A Sinner’s Progress. The books have ranged in format from hand-silkscreened limited editions to tabloid-style newspapers and pulp comics, each in service to its narrative function. Thanks to a fellowship from the NYPL’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers in 2010, Sandlin has begun work on a graphic novel, which he intends to be the culmination of the series. Belfaust, a love-triangle mystery loosely based on the Faust legend, will depict the backstory of the three main characters in A Sinner’s Progress and bring the narrative to closure. Sandlin’s presentation will discuss his influences and process in regard to the series.

Fri., June 03, 2011 / 7:00 PM
$12 in adv, $15 at door
Cirque des Batardes
(presented by HITS Company)

Stemming from old world styles and techniques, Cirque des Batardes is an avant-garde approach to classical forms such as vaudeville, commedia dell’arte, buffon, ventriloquism and, of course, cirque. Essentially taking on the form of a comic variety show, Cirque features a dozen acts including dancers, actors, and musicians to create a hilarious evening of spectacle and oddity. Led by their questionable emcee, the entire company seems to come from a different time. The entire production, in fact, appears in sepia tone like an old film dusted off and rediscovered. The company of misfits and performers must learn deal with their old school ways in the modern context in order to survive.

FEATURING:
Erin Debold
Krista Worby
Jo Mei
Jack Ferver
Amelia Meath
Becky Abrams
Colin Drummond
Nessa Norich
Nick Choksi
William Popp
Carly Hoogendyk
Mark Junek
Julia Eichten
Addison Anderson



OUT OF PRACTICE: CURATED BY NUDASHANK
ART BLOG ART BLOG
new temporary location:
508 West 26th St., 11th Floor

ICP Store, 1133 Avenue of the Americas
Friday, June 3, 6:00pm–7:30pm

Join Danny Lyon for a signing of his book Deep Sea Diver.

With his vintage Leica and accompanied by a young translator named Lolly Pop, American photographer Danny Lyon traveled across Shanxi Province in North West China six times between 2005 and 2009. The result of Lyon’s unfailing enthusiasm for immersing himself in local banter and customs is an extraordinary portrait of China and the Chinese, one seldom seen by foreigners. Lyon’s unparalleled photographic findings and discoveries are presented in this limited edition photobook alongside his handwritten annotations and commentary, as well as his ever-inquisitive and non-judgmental prose.

An Interview with Deborah Simon.

Deborah in the studio with her sculptures. ©2011 The 22 Magazine

This past Friday, I paid a visit to Deborah Simon who has an upcoming show at NY Studio Gallery‘s LZ Project Space opening this Friday, May 20th. Deborah has been a painter and sculptor for several years now and will be part of the Sculpture Space residency  in Utica, this coming October and November. She has worked at the Bronx Zoo building habitats and “intellectual toys” for the animals, and her work reflects the understanding of the dual nature of man-made versus natural environments and the drawbacks and necessity of both. Her sculpture’s present a strange encounter and cause the viewer to approach the animal in an unusual and raw manner, suggesting a reevaluation of the nature of human and animal interaction.

We truly appreciate her taking the time to talk about her work and upcoming show.

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

The 22 Magazine: You worked at the Bronx Zoo correct? Can you tell us a little about what you did there?

Deborah Simon: Sure, I did some design work. It was everything from giving exhibits face lifts to mural work, to sometimes just flat out designing and building exhibits. [I also built] intellectual toys for the animals. With that you have to make everything look natural. So [you have to make a] tiger toy that looks [for example] like a rotten piece of wood. It was one of those oddball weird request situations, keepers would come and say we need hummingbird feeders made out of XY and Z and we’d have to figure how to make them look natural.

The 22: How did you get into that kind of work? Did you study design in school or elsewhere?

DS: No, I’ve got a fine arts background. [I studied at] San Francisco Art Institute, which prepares you for nothing but making conceptual art. I just happened to have a realistic bent to what I do, which was thoroughly discouraged but…
I started working as a muralist and then the zoo had an ad in the paper. I replied to it and got hired. It’s one of those jobs where the guy who runs the department is fantastic, and he just expects that you need a lot of on the job training. You need to be able to weld, you need to be able to fiberglass, you need to be able to do some basic carpentry. There are just so many skills that no one person is going to have them all. They do invest in teaching you quite a bit [so], I learned a lot, and it all goes back into what I do.

The 22: In regards to your artists statement, which talks a little about the animal confronting the viewer in an unrestricted environment, did working at the zoo conflict with ideas of how animals should be treated in any way?

DS: I think it’s a conflict a lot of the people who work at the zoo have, because everyone who works there more or less loves animals. We all have multiple animals, we are deeply concerned about animal welfare. Some of the holding areas are very old and not that great. Some of the animals are permanently on medications because [there is] not the best ventilation but, on the other hand, you can’t just let them go. [I believe] Finland ran into this problem. They decided it was cruel and inhumane to keep this baboon exhibit. They decided it was inhumane to keep more tropical animals in Finland, but they couldn’t get rid of them because they breed really well and every zoo has a ton of them. So, they were going to euthanize them but the public had a fit and they had to keep them. So, now they have these unhappy baboons; animals that are obviously not doing well, but there are no other options for them. [I think] a lot of the people [that work at the zoo] go through this. [They think] these animals didn’t ask for this, they didn’t want to become ambassadors of their species, but on the other hand sometimes when your standing and watching the public watch these animals and they suddenly make this connection to the human traits of the animals you really hope it does something. They are suddenly more aware of them and, you think, I hope this means that it will translate into something, maybe [that wouldn’t be there] if they hadn’t seen it. Then again, zoo animals they don’t behave like wild animals, they have three meals a day, they sleep all day. [In the end] it’s a lot of mixed emotions.

The 22: A lot of your animals actually are puppets or look a lot like traditional marionettes. Stylistically how did you decide this was how you were going to build?

DS: It’s weird because I have this totally anal goal to be as accurate as humanly possibly, but I’m always reminding myself it’s art, not taxidermy. I was living in India for a while and India is a very sculpture oriented place. I had been painting for years and years at that point, and maybe it was just being around so much sculpture. I was home in the states and one day I just thought, what would happen if I make sculpted animals with fake fur? The hyena was the first one. I found [the hyena’s fur] in the bargain bin and I thought, this looks just like spotted hyena fur, no wonder it’s on sale. I brought back Sculpy and fur and whatever else I thought I wouldn’t be able to get in India, and just started working. I was originally thinking of porcelain dolls-[with] the hard heads and the soft body. I was thinking more along the lines of what would it be like to make these things so they look like creeped out porcelain dolls, but they actually ended up a little but more like [weird] taxidermy.

Deborah working in her studio. photo ©2011 Ted Szczepanski

The 22: They seem to have this really human quality, a very aggressive straight on gaze…

DS:I feel even though animals are a really popular subject right now, it’s always animal as metaphor or animal as parable. They play the role of an odalisque and they don’t confront the viewer. They are a stand in for history, they’re a stand in for human behavior, but they are never just themselves, and when they are themselves it’s more kitschy animal art. I want it to be as if you were walking into their space. It’s kind of that feeling when you out in the woods or hiking, or even in Central Park [where] it tends to be a bird of prey, a hawk or something, and you have that instant where they look at you, and you look at them, and you have no idea what’s going to go on. Especially if it’s big enough to hurt you. Then it’s this totally different interaction than the zoo or anything else. Your walking into their space, and they are psychologically dominating it. The sculptures themselves are going to be hung so your going to have to walk around them. They force you to move around them instead of being on the walls or giving a pathway.

The 22: Can you tell me a little about Coyote Pursue’s puppet project?

DS: It was a pretty amazing experience. Collaborating was new to me but Matt Reeck is a good friend and amazing to work with. We shored up each others strengths and weaknesses really well. I would never have been able to direct something like that. I think in the future I may do more puppetry but do it so it’s video.

Coyote Pursues, 2010. photo courtesy of St. Ann's Warehouse

 The 22: Is there a difference between building the puppets versus building the sculptures? Is that something you had to learn?

DS: Yes. St. Ann’s puppet lab is a nine month program so they are a huge resource, but it took me forever just to figure how to walk them. It took me two months just to build one, to actually physically construct it so that it moved properly. Once I got the basic structure it took me weeks to figure out how to string it, and that’s one of the times the lab was great. I brought them in and said I don’t know what to do, and one of the guys [showed me], and it was done. It was wonderful.

The 22: The piece itself was about a world where humans are gone, and coyotes are the only ones left right?

DS: [Matt Reeck] is a wonderful poet and he gave me a book of his poetry and asked me to illustrate it. At the time I was just feeling like, I don’t want to paint anything, and I don’t want to sketch.
[But] I was thinking [the poetry] would be perfect to do a puppet show with, and so we said what the hell, we’ll write a puppet lab. We threw it together in two weeks, and we were really surprised we got in. Originally we had taken three of his poems, more short prose really, and the one we both had a very clear vision-that was the same vision-was [the coyote] one. We started building and time started ticking by, and we realized the other two we’re never going to make it, and that we wouldn’t have time [to perform more than one]. You only got twenty minutes tops to perform. So, we decided just to focus on the coyotes, and it was really based on his writing, and [the idea of] not using the animals as parables but to be really Darwinian about it. What would a coyote really be doing if they were wandering around in this world with nothing really left. We were thinking of it as The Road but with coyotes.

The 22: Did you do a cover for The Beastie Boys [Intergalatic]?

DS: I had actually done the paintings and they ended up on the cover. The paintings were actually in the small works show at NYU and Mike D’s wife  bought them. So, she came over to my studio and she’s chatting and we’re having this very nice conversation, and she keeps talking about her husband’s band and so I’m thinking….ok, band whatever and being polite, I ask oh what band is your husband in? And she’s says, The Beastie Boys, and at that point I’m immediately intimidated. So about six months later, they called to see if it was ok with me if they used it as an album cover and I just thought….ooook, twist my arm. It was just this little freak thing, they were just these little freak paintings, that I wasn’t planning to do as a body of work or anything.

Memento mori: Ocelot and ocelot skeleton, oil on wood, 68” w x 36” h, 2001

The 22: What about the memento mori series paintings? Can you talk a little about what this series means to you and why you decided to do it?

DS: I think in that series I’d been reading a lot about evolution. I was thinking about how death influences life. I was thinking about a Darwinian perspective, you have these animals with these constant pressures, and it’s survival of the fittest but also thinking about viewing what human’s do in the world [destruction and pollution] as unnatural, but it is natural because we are part of the world and this is part of what we do. Animals routinely destroy their environments, but they don’t do it in the same numbers that we do. Elephants constantly  trash environments and have to move on, but there are so few of them, they aren’t ruining Africa or Asia-we sort of beat them to it. I guess I was thinking about that simple pressure and interaction, and how some of your stiffest competition is from your species. You know species always have more children than your going to need. You really only need a one to one replacement and chances are that’s all your going to get if your lucky.