The 22 Magazine


T.L. Solien
September 13, 2013, 10:59 am
Filed under: ART, PAINTING, SCULPTURE | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

T.L._Solien_Masked_Lovebird_11.5_w-456x550
WEBSITE
SHOW AT TORY FOLLIARD



Darius Martin
September 11, 2013, 12:07 am
Filed under: ART, PAINTING | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Darius Martin, "Scrambled Portrait" 2012, Oil/Canvas
WEBSITE



Brianna Angelakis
August 20, 2013, 10:40 am
Filed under: ART, PAINTING | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

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WEBSITE



Joseba Eskubi #2
July 19, 2013, 6:52 pm
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Óleo sobre lienzo. 2013

Website



Ulla Gmeiner.
September 12, 2012, 10:32 pm
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WEBSITE.



Alexander Tinei.
July 25, 2012, 10:27 pm
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WEBSITE.



Mia Brownell.
July 11, 2012, 9:40 pm
Filed under: ART, THE WEEK/THE WEEKEND | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

WEBSITE.
GROUP SHOW AT  LESLEY HELLER.



Georg Dienz.
May 21, 2012, 3:01 am
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WEBSITE.

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Anne Wölk.
May 16, 2012, 4:12 am
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WEBSITE.

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Interview with Jonathan Beer.
May 14, 2012, 9:15 pm
Filed under: ART, INTERVIEWS | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

By Max Evry

Through crisp technique and counterintuitive juxtapositions, Jonathan Beer’s art straddles the line between illustration and full-blown abstraction, often side-by-side. His emphasis is on decay and motifs of memory, with each piece attempting to conjure the reality of the mind, something like a Polaroid snapshot of his mental state.

Fresh off earning an M.F.A., Beer was recently awarded a summer residency in Leipzig, Germany, and he’ll be holding a solo show called “Landscape Revisited” at the Ferst Art Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology from May 17-June 30. His M.F.A. Thesis show at the New York Academy of Art opens on the 15th of May from 6-8pm.

We talked to Beer at his studio in New York about his process, and how it is aided by an intuition that is producing truly striking imagery.

Max Evry: Do you ever look back at a piece and find you’ve overdone it, went one or two steps too far?

Jonathan Beer: Oh yeah, all the time. Learning to not paint is one of the hardest things to do. I remember talking to one of the instructors here about that, and someone told him that a mature artist knows when to not paint. After he said that I started to think about that when I compulsively reach to make a mark on something I hadn’t touched in a while. It’s like, “Wait, is this right?” Now if I’m not sure I let it sit, and a lot of time when
I get the urge to do something it’s because I just want to work, so I’ll just start something new at that point. I get that energy out and it protects the other stuff from a possibly destructive decision.

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Renee McGinnis
April 2, 2012, 3:54 am
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WEBSITE.

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Bonnie Gloris.
September 20, 2011, 5:33 pm
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New work from Leilani Bustamante’s upcoming show: PREY.

From her upcoming show Prey, opening at Modern Eden in San Francisco.

Prey: The shroud that is the modern world requires us as a species to trade our primeval urges for polished surfaces, a carefully controlled construct to mask the suppression of our nature as animals. For underneath we all rage, quietly delighting in instinctive, unyielding behavior intrinsic and vital to our own ilk. It is only when we remove this polish to explore these denied implications that we ultimately succumb to our animal selves.

ABOUT THE ARTIST: Leilani Bustamante was born in Santa Rosa California and is a graduate of the Academy of Art University, San Francisco.  She grew up between the suburban sprawl and rural Fort Bragg, where she draws inspiration from their simultaneous decay and growth.  Her work often voices themes of mortality exploring elements of death, rebirth, beauty and spoil, the loveliness of the macabre and the mournful influence of osteological motifs. She currently lives and works in San Francisco.


Support This Project: Secret City, Robert Lucy

I’m so pleased to present one of my personal favorite’s, Robert Lucy.

Lucy studied with Ed Paschke at Northwestern and eventually headed to SAIC to finish. His works are somewhere between altarpieces, meditations and still life’s on ordinary objects or people, and are influenced by mystic teachings, dreams and the inspiration of Lucy’s daily encounters.

For a full account of Lucy’s work, there happens to be an amazing timeline on his website that walks the viewer through the life of Robert Lucy (particularly great story in 2005.)

WEBSITE.

DONATE TO SECRET CITY.



Cindy Wright.


WEBSITE.

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SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: THE BEST KEPT SECRET.

“In October 2007, I rented a small white room on West 14th Street in New York City. I asked three friends to meet me there, and to bring anything they might like to share in the way of a poem or a quote or a picture. We sat in a circle on the floor and I explained that I wanted to start a sanctuary for artists, a regular gathering that would celebrate the creative spirit and those who keep it alive. We discussed the idea, and everyone shared their poems, pictures and quotes. We all agreed that a monthly event celebrating artists and creativity could be a very powerful thing. We all left feeling excited. I booked the room for a Sunday morning the following month. And so the Secret City was born.”

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PAINT IT NOW Interview at Fowler Arts Collective.

Paint It Now installation in progress

This past Sunday, I took a moment to swing by Fowler Arts Collective in Greenpoint. I had the opportunity to speak with founder Cecelia (aka Lia) Post and Scott Chasse, one of the curators of the upcoming Paint It Now show which will be part of this year’s Northside Open Studios. Paint It Now opens Friday, May 27 from 7 to 10pm with an additional reception for NOS is June. We appreciate them taking the time to chat with us! Read or listen below!

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

The 22 Magazine: First off,  I just wanted to talk to you about how Fowler started. What year did you start?

Lia Post (Founder): It’s only been about a year. I came in July of 2010. So, last Summer. This July will be our official anniversary, but our first show was just in October, so its been about eight months now.

The 22: What show was that [the first show]?

LP: It was called ENTER, it was a big group show with some of my studio artists and some friends from the neighborhood. It coincided with the first Greenpoint Open Studios-oh actually it was the second! …of the Open Studios in Greenpoint and it coincided with a big light festival called [Bright to Light]. It was a good way to start off the space.


Bright to Light: Nuit Blanche in Greenpoint, part of the opening of Fowler Art Collective

The 22: And you came from Philadelphia?

LP: Yes. Originally I’m from South Carolina, and I’ve kind of lived all over the place, but my most recent was Philadelphia. I went to an MFA program at The University of Pennsylvania and moved to New York after that. So I’ve been in New York for about two years now.

The 22: On the blog it said you got laid off and decided to open to a collective. Exactly how did you do that?

LP: Well the first year in New York was really hard. It was in the midst of no one having any jobs, so I was trying to do a lot of freelance work and that’s sort of hard. Finally I was able to get a waitress job and I had that for a few months, got laid off, and I was just like “Oh my God I can’t even keep a regular restaurant job.” So it was kind of out of a sense of the bottom, and having to figure out something to do, and I was really missing the artists community I had in Philly before I came here and knew there was a good artists community in the neighborhood. [So it was] wanting to kind of find a way to connect with that community, [and then] I sort of impulsively [decided] to make this whole thing and got a few friends to help me. It kind of evolved from wanting to have a live/work space with friends and I found all these really interesting huge commercial spaces in Greenpoint, which is really exciting because I live in Greenpoint. So that evolved, and I did the budget and realized I could have a gallery along with studio spaces, if I rented out the studio spaces. I got some friends to help me build the walls and it was good to go. It filled up pretty fast. Scott was actually one of the first artists that came when none of the walls were built and was like, “yeah, I’ll do it, I’ll take a studio. “

The 22: So, are you funded by anyone?

LP: It’s pretty self-sufficient. I put a large investment [in] myself. I got a small business loan and [had some] small savings. Mostly I just had to fund the start-up costs, like the walls. Almost right away it was running itself with the studio spaces. So that’s really good, it worked out well. I’m starting to look into getting funding with indiegogo and I just got fiscally sponsored with Fractured Atlas so that will sort of start helping us in getting some grants and things.

The 22: Great, so this show is Scott and one other curator? [To Scott] So do you want to tell me a little about what this show?

Scott Chasse: Sure, it’s a show that we actually did, Thomas Buildmore and I, two times now in Boston-in 2008 and 2010. [Basically] we’re taking a handful of painters that we either know personally or respect and have been able to connect with, and we’re putting them all in the same room. We’re providing the paint itself, we’re providing the material and we mix it down to a certain viscosity, we try to control that and that’s about it. We just set them loose, they’re able to paint on the walls, react to the space, react to each others work and at the end our goal is to have this giant cohesive painting installation that just takes over the space but is unified by the control of the materials. We explain to the artists up front that we want to see this opaque black directly on the white, the harsh contrast, as opposed to them being able to water it down to gray or mix it with white, or mid-tones, we don’t want any of that we just want harsh black on white.

The 22: So the viscosity, was that for any reason?

SC: It’s A) the look, and B) it’s such a pleasure to work with at this viscosity. We get that feedback from the artists all the time. It’s just so enjoyable to use the paint and it’s actually a specific brand. I’m happy to say Lascaux sponsored this show very generously. They handed us some product and we have always cut it down the same way, since day one. We were actually just buying it for the very first show, out-of-pocket, and we are continuing to develop our relationship [with Lascaux]. It was really nice of them to give us a bunch of paint for this one, and everybody is really enjoying it again.

The 22:  I was reading the statement and it seemed part of what you guys were trying to do was make commentary on the state and style of art, as opposed to personal interpretations and a lot of it looks really pop and street art. Does that just come from your [personal] backgrounds [or connections]?

SC: There is definitely that influence. I don’t think we’re trying to make this at all a reflection of street art, but just painting in general. Street art is just a part of painting these days. We want the show to be taken as a painting exhibit. These are painters, regardless of what their backgrounds are, and there are definitely painters in this show that are very far away from anything having to do with street art but when they are painting on the wall next to someone you might recognize from the street, it’s easy to blur those lines between which is which, and that is definitely a goal of the exhibit. To see how people are reacting to each other in the space as well as how their varied backgrounds just coexist.

The 22:
So more about collaboration than anything?

SC:
Yep, exactly.

The 22:
So the exhibit is only the painting on the wall?

(LEFT: Morgan Anderson from Philadelphia works on
the Paint It Now installation.)

SC: It will be eighty percent painting on the wall and we’re going to hang some of the 2D and 3D work from the artists. Probably eight to ten pieces. We’ve actually saved one wall in the space [for that].

The 22: What are the dates of the show?

SC: It opens on May 27th. The opening reception is 7-10 and it runs through July 6th. And we’re going to have a 2nd party during Northside Open Studios. That is June 17th from 8-10. It will be another artist reception and that’s the Friday night of Open Studios weekend here, so it should be really fun.

The 22: I know most [of your artists] are from Brooklyn, but some of them are from Philly and Boston? Who’s coming from Philly and Boston?

SC: I think we’re at about twenty artists now, there are great people from all towns, I could go through the whole roster but I’d probably space on somebody. [laughs]

The 22: [laughs] Oh that’s fine, I totally understand!

SC: Tom Buildmore is actually based in Philly right now, but I met him in Boston, so that’s probably the connection right there. That’s why we are still dipping into the Boston pool and we’re actively participating in the Philly pool. Tom’s down there right now, he has a great space down there called Stupid Easy. It’s almost like this, just a smaller version. It doesn’t have a whole bunch of studios, it’s just a room they use for a production studio and they use it as a gallery as well. So he’s really connected with the scene in Philly.

The 22: And where did you guys meet?

SC: Boston, MA. At this building, The Distillery, in South Boston where we both had studio space.  And that building [in the main lobby] is where we did the first two Paint It Now shows.

The 22: Are you both painters?

SC: Yes we are.

The 22: So is there anything interesting on the horizon for the space?

Lia Post: Well this show I’ve been really excited about. Scott and Thomas have been planning it for a really long time so its nice it’s finally coming together. So this will be up for most of our summer. Right now I’m not exactly sure what I’m going to do for the next show, but it’s probably going to allow the show to evolve. So I’ll probably sand out some of the pieces and then have a show of studio artists. More of a process based show, so they kind of collaborate in the gallery together, or have a long-term process going on. I think there will be another one of the light shows that we had last October so that will be our anniversary, and I [want] to have a studio [show along with that]. After that I have some friends coming from Philly that were part of my MFA program that are going to come and do a show. Photo based and paper based, I think. It should be really interesting. Then, two Australian artists are going to come and do a really short kind of performance based piece in the fall.

The 22: How many studios do you have now?

LP: There are eighteen built studios. All kind of varying sizes. A lot of people share the larger spaces. I think there are about twenty-five artists working in here now. The spaces range from a hundred square feet to over two hundred square feet.

The 22: And you do photography as well?

LP: Yep, we built this photo wall, so that’s been fun. It’s been kind of slow. I’m a photographer and I don’t even know how I’m going to use it yet but it’s been a nice resource to have.



An Interview with Deborah Simon.

Deborah in the studio with her sculptures. ©2011 The 22 Magazine

This past Friday, I paid a visit to Deborah Simon who has an upcoming show at NY Studio Gallery‘s LZ Project Space opening this Friday, May 20th. Deborah has been a painter and sculptor for several years now and will be part of the Sculpture Space residency  in Utica, this coming October and November. She has worked at the Bronx Zoo building habitats and “intellectual toys” for the animals, and her work reflects the understanding of the dual nature of man-made versus natural environments and the drawbacks and necessity of both. Her sculpture’s present a strange encounter and cause the viewer to approach the animal in an unusual and raw manner, suggesting a reevaluation of the nature of human and animal interaction.

We truly appreciate her taking the time to talk about her work and upcoming show.

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

The 22 Magazine: You worked at the Bronx Zoo correct? Can you tell us a little about what you did there?

Deborah Simon: Sure, I did some design work. It was everything from giving exhibits face lifts to mural work, to sometimes just flat out designing and building exhibits. [I also built] intellectual toys for the animals. With that you have to make everything look natural. So [you have to make a] tiger toy that looks [for example] like a rotten piece of wood. It was one of those oddball weird request situations, keepers would come and say we need hummingbird feeders made out of XY and Z and we’d have to figure how to make them look natural.

The 22: How did you get into that kind of work? Did you study design in school or elsewhere?

DS: No, I’ve got a fine arts background. [I studied at] San Francisco Art Institute, which prepares you for nothing but making conceptual art. I just happened to have a realistic bent to what I do, which was thoroughly discouraged but…
I started working as a muralist and then the zoo had an ad in the paper. I replied to it and got hired. It’s one of those jobs where the guy who runs the department is fantastic, and he just expects that you need a lot of on the job training. You need to be able to weld, you need to be able to fiberglass, you need to be able to do some basic carpentry. There are just so many skills that no one person is going to have them all. They do invest in teaching you quite a bit [so], I learned a lot, and it all goes back into what I do.

The 22: In regards to your artists statement, which talks a little about the animal confronting the viewer in an unrestricted environment, did working at the zoo conflict with ideas of how animals should be treated in any way?

DS: I think it’s a conflict a lot of the people who work at the zoo have, because everyone who works there more or less loves animals. We all have multiple animals, we are deeply concerned about animal welfare. Some of the holding areas are very old and not that great. Some of the animals are permanently on medications because [there is] not the best ventilation but, on the other hand, you can’t just let them go. [I believe] Finland ran into this problem. They decided it was cruel and inhumane to keep this baboon exhibit. They decided it was inhumane to keep more tropical animals in Finland, but they couldn’t get rid of them because they breed really well and every zoo has a ton of them. So, they were going to euthanize them but the public had a fit and they had to keep them. So, now they have these unhappy baboons; animals that are obviously not doing well, but there are no other options for them. [I think] a lot of the people [that work at the zoo] go through this. [They think] these animals didn’t ask for this, they didn’t want to become ambassadors of their species, but on the other hand sometimes when your standing and watching the public watch these animals and they suddenly make this connection to the human traits of the animals you really hope it does something. They are suddenly more aware of them and, you think, I hope this means that it will translate into something, maybe [that wouldn't be there] if they hadn’t seen it. Then again, zoo animals they don’t behave like wild animals, they have three meals a day, they sleep all day. [In the end] it’s a lot of mixed emotions.

The 22: A lot of your animals actually are puppets or look a lot like traditional marionettes. Stylistically how did you decide this was how you were going to build?

DS: It’s weird because I have this totally anal goal to be as accurate as humanly possibly, but I’m always reminding myself it’s art, not taxidermy. I was living in India for a while and India is a very sculpture oriented place. I had been painting for years and years at that point, and maybe it was just being around so much sculpture. I was home in the states and one day I just thought, what would happen if I make sculpted animals with fake fur? The hyena was the first one. I found [the hyena's fur] in the bargain bin and I thought, this looks just like spotted hyena fur, no wonder it’s on sale. I brought back Sculpy and fur and whatever else I thought I wouldn’t be able to get in India, and just started working. I was originally thinking of porcelain dolls-[with] the hard heads and the soft body. I was thinking more along the lines of what would it be like to make these things so they look like creeped out porcelain dolls, but they actually ended up a little but more like [weird] taxidermy.

Deborah working in her studio. photo ©2011 Ted Szczepanski

The 22: They seem to have this really human quality, a very aggressive straight on gaze…

DS:I feel even though animals are a really popular subject right now, it’s always animal as metaphor or animal as parable. They play the role of an odalisque and they don’t confront the viewer. They are a stand in for history, they’re a stand in for human behavior, but they are never just themselves, and when they are themselves it’s more kitschy animal art. I want it to be as if you were walking into their space. It’s kind of that feeling when you out in the woods or hiking, or even in Central Park [where] it tends to be a bird of prey, a hawk or something, and you have that instant where they look at you, and you look at them, and you have no idea what’s going to go on. Especially if it’s big enough to hurt you. Then it’s this totally different interaction than the zoo or anything else. Your walking into their space, and they are psychologically dominating it. The sculptures themselves are going to be hung so your going to have to walk around them. They force you to move around them instead of being on the walls or giving a pathway.

The 22: Can you tell me a little about Coyote Pursue’s puppet project?

DS: It was a pretty amazing experience. Collaborating was new to me but Matt Reeck is a good friend and amazing to work with. We shored up each others strengths and weaknesses really well. I would never have been able to direct something like that. I think in the future I may do more puppetry but do it so it’s video.

Coyote Pursues, 2010. photo courtesy of St. Ann's Warehouse

 The 22: Is there a difference between building the puppets versus building the sculptures? Is that something you had to learn?

DS: Yes. St. Ann’s puppet lab is a nine month program so they are a huge resource, but it took me forever just to figure how to walk them. It took me two months just to build one, to actually physically construct it so that it moved properly. Once I got the basic structure it took me weeks to figure out how to string it, and that’s one of the times the lab was great. I brought them in and said I don’t know what to do, and one of the guys [showed me], and it was done. It was wonderful.

The 22: The piece itself was about a world where humans are gone, and coyotes are the only ones left right?

DS: [Matt Reeck] is a wonderful poet and he gave me a book of his poetry and asked me to illustrate it. At the time I was just feeling like, I don’t want to paint anything, and I don’t want to sketch.
[But] I was thinking [the poetry] would be perfect to do a puppet show with, and so we said what the hell, we’ll write a puppet lab. We threw it together in two weeks, and we were really surprised we got in. Originally we had taken three of his poems, more short prose really, and the one we both had a very clear vision-that was the same vision-was [the coyote] one. We started building and time started ticking by, and we realized the other two we’re never going to make it, and that we wouldn’t have time [to perform more than one]. You only got twenty minutes tops to perform. So, we decided just to focus on the coyotes, and it was really based on his writing, and [the idea of] not using the animals as parables but to be really Darwinian about it. What would a coyote really be doing if they were wandering around in this world with nothing really left. We were thinking of it as The Road but with coyotes.

The 22: Did you do a cover for The Beastie Boys [Intergalatic]?

DS: I had actually done the paintings and they ended up on the cover. The paintings were actually in the small works show at NYU and Mike D’s wife  bought them. So, she came over to my studio and she’s chatting and we’re having this very nice conversation, and she keeps talking about her husband’s band and so I’m thinking….ok, band whatever and being polite, I ask oh what band is your husband in? And she’s says, The Beastie Boys, and at that point I’m immediately intimidated. So about six months later, they called to see if it was ok with me if they used it as an album cover and I just thought….ooook, twist my arm. It was just this little freak thing, they were just these little freak paintings, that I wasn’t planning to do as a body of work or anything.

Memento mori: Ocelot and ocelot skeleton, oil on wood, 68” w x 36” h, 2001

The 22: What about the memento mori series paintings? Can you talk a little about what this series means to you and why you decided to do it?

DS: I think in that series I’d been reading a lot about evolution. I was thinking about how death influences life. I was thinking about a Darwinian perspective, you have these animals with these constant pressures, and it’s survival of the fittest but also thinking about viewing what human’s do in the world [destruction and pollution] as unnatural, but it is natural because we are part of the world and this is part of what we do. Animals routinely destroy their environments, but they don’t do it in the same numbers that we do. Elephants constantly  trash environments and have to move on, but there are so few of them, they aren’t ruining Africa or Asia-we sort of beat them to it. I guess I was thinking about that simple pressure and interaction, and how some of your stiffest competition is from your species. You know species always have more children than your going to need. You really only need a one to one replacement and chances are that’s all your going to get if your lucky.



Grossmalerman!/Fireside Puppet Chats/Nelson Manobar/Al Wadzinski/2000 Years of Physics/RAZVAN BOAR/Romantic Agony/BLIP FEST

WATCH THE 1st EPISODE.

May 19, 2011–June 25, 2011
531 West 26th Street, NYC

Guy Richards Smit satirically bends artistic authorship with new paintings and video in Grossmalerman!  Thanks to Guy Richards Smit for the following text from Jonathan Grossmalerman, writing in defense of his portrayal in Grossmalerman!, Amagansett, April 2011:

“That a man, any man, be he a thundering genius or a mere citizen, might die never having had his own sitcom, seems to me, a terrible injustice.” Those were the last words of my father, Saul Grossmalerman, a strikingly sullen man with few ambitions, a habitual liar about boring things not worth lying about. What a piece of shit. In any case, this was one of the more interesting things he said and that it was uttered on his deathbed gave it a certain…approximation of gravitas. For what it’s worth, it has always been a burr on the tunic of my outrageous success. It was with that in mind that I, perhaps foolishly, gave permission to the painfully charismatic Guy Richards Smit when asked to use my name and paintings in his “sitcom,” a show ostensibly about me and my life. Let me state frankly: it is not.(READ MORE.)


Fireside Puppet Chats @ DIXON PLACE: Christopher Williams and Patti Bradshaw

May 18 at 6:00pm FREE
Curated and hosted by Kate Brehm, this on-going series features impromptu, informal and intimate conversations with NYC’s puppet artists. This month’s special guests: Christopher Williams and Patti Bradshaw and we will discuss the End of the World! Followed by a performance of Alissa Hunnicutt’s The Kid Inside. (READ MORE.)

“Nelson Manobar,” with Jimbo Blachly and Lytle Shaw, editors of the Chadwick Family Papers

Date: Thursday, 19 May 2011, 7–9 pm
Location: Cabinet, 300 Nevins Street, Brooklyn (map and directions here)
FREE. No RSVP necessary

Please join Jimbo Blachly and Lytle Shaw, editors of the Chadwick Family Papers, for the land launch of the Nelson Manobar. The Chadwicks’ recently restored occupiable model of Admiral Nelson’s HMS Victory has never before been exhibited publicly in the United States.

The event features:

Nautical electronica

Drinks from the hull of the Manobar

Rare recordings of Chadwick Dalton’s legendary sea chanty collection

(READ MORE.)

False Idols: Al Wadzinski @NYSG.

Reception May 20; 7-9pm
May 19, 2011
through June 19, 2011

NY Studio Gallery is pleased to present Al Wadzinski’s third solo show in New York. Wadzinski’s False Idols refer to the predominantly Judeo-Christian concept of idolatry, the worship of a physical object as a god. Here these carefully assembled icons are comprised of humanity’s abandoned cast-offs, the remnants of our bloated consumer culture now repurposed as inert fetish objects. The centerpiece of the exhibition revolves around a massive golden calf, referencing the Old Testament story, but this god-proxy’s body is a shopping cart filled with gold-painted bones, its undeniably bovine head an amalgam of odd parts ranging from boots to a Christmas tree stand. (READ MORE.)

The 10 Most Beautiful Experiments: A Walk Through 2000 Years of Physics @BROOKLYN BRAINERY

Thursday, May 19, 6:30-8pm

If we think back to our High School years…probably nothing. But to the scientific mind, the concept of the “elegant proof” is deep and satisfying thing. In a survey some years back, physicists identified the 10 experiments that they felt were not just important…but really cool, elegant…and beautiful. They span millennia, from Ancient Egypt to Modern Europe.

Each experiment will be related, along with the how and why of its execution (some may be tried at home – depending on your research budget). How to measure the size, mass and rotation of the Earth. What light is made up of. The atom and electron. Wave mechanics. And a smidgen of Quantum Mechanics. At the end, you will walk out with a broad, expansive survey of Physics and its history. Led by Daniel. (READ MORE.)

RAZVAN BOAR – Solo Show @ Ana Cristea Gallery
May 19 – June 25, 2011
Opening Reception: Thursday, May 19, 2011, 6 – 8pm
(READ MORE.)

Romantic Agony @ HORTON GALLERY.
May 19 – Jun 18, 2011


Ion Birch
Doron Langberg
Jacques Louis Vidal
Summer Wheat

(READ MORE.)

BLIP FESTIVAL @EYEBEAM.

Blip Festival will take place May 19-21, 2011

Marshall McLuhan writes, “Obsolescence never meant the end of anything, it’s just the beginning.” Taking Blip Festival’s spirit of ‘obsolescence as the beginning’ into the realm of visual art, a nightly screening is presented by artists who are bringing new life to the technology and aesthetics of our recent past.

From animated GIFs to video collage, from memes to digital abstraction, the artists included in Blip Festival Gallery employ the wealth of creative technologies of networked culture. Includes work and premieres by: Sterling Crispin, Alexandra Gorczynski and Nicolas Sassoon.

Curated by Lindsay Howard

(READ MORE.)



ENNO DE KROON.


FLICKR.

From the Artist~ As a painter I consider egg cartons as two-and-a-half dimensional objects which offer me remarkable possibilities for imagery. The waves of the egg cartons limit the viewer’s perception; they also make him aware of his positioning towards the image. The intentional limitation in subjective perception gives room for imagination and recall: the process of occlusion. By a fusion of direct and indirect perception conventional imagery is overtaken. At first sight this leads to a physical and mental incompleteness, that forces an integration which can only take place within the inner experience, apart from time and space. (compare the ‘head of Janus’, that looks at the present and the future congruently.)
The shape of my new canvases – the eggbox structures- increases the amount of possible visual images in an almost exponential way. This forces the viewer towards an active perception, constantly changing the view-point and focus. Furthermore the true and represented space in these paintings interact during perception. One could say that the complete image just emerges sublimated in the viewers mind. Gestalt psychology states that human perception aims for completeness. Perceptions are being added subconsciously. My eggcubist works evoke conscious and dynamic adding.

More pictures at: www.flickr.com/photos/ennodekroon

For more information: info@ennodekroon.nl

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