SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: Jeffrey Beebe, Printing the Map of Western Refractoria.


Jeffrey Beebe is a mapmaker but the only place you’re likely to find any of his cartography is in his brilliant mind or broken heart. His past experiences  are laid out as complex and often hilarious lands. We’ve featured some of his phenomenal creations  before, and now he’s looking to print a 25 limited edition set of The Map of Western Refractoria. A cross between geek and psychoanalysis it contains things such as the lands of Vast Nonsense, The Impossible Narrative, and The Oldest Ocean. He’s only got a few days left and a little ways to go, so please help him out if you can!


SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: Happy Baby, The Movie (Stephen Elliott.)

Happy Baby Kickstarter Video Update #3: Muddy Waters from Stephen Elliott on Vimeo.

Happy Baby is a movie based on the novel of the same name by Stephen Elliott, declared, by the New York Times, as “Surely the most beautiful novel ever written about S&M, juvenile detention centers, and drugs.” Happy Baby is the story of Theo, once an orphan in the Detroit foster care system now a grown man living in California. He returns to Detroit to reconnect with the love of his life. Originally set in Chicago, you can read a chapter from the book here.


THE WEEK/WEEKEND: September 28-October 4.

Sunday, September 30th
Dixon Place

  • Cabaret star, Justin Vivian Bond will sing for us
  • Chef Amanda Freitag will present the food offering.
  • Painter John Devaney will share his beautiful work, which captures the endless parade of life.
  • Brooklyn Express Drumline will energize with their rhythms.
  • Charlotte Booker will make a New York poem with the assembled crowd. We’ll play a game of New York trivia…

And, of course, there will be storytelling, live music, community, art and LOTS of clapping. What more could you want out of a Sunday morning? Come celebrate the city with us. Oh, and feel free to bring something tasty for the refreshment table!

OCTOBER 4, 2012–JANUARY 13, 2013
The Whitney

Over the past decade, New York–based artist Wade Guyton (b. 1972) has pioneered a groundbreaking body of work that explores our changing relationships to images and artworks through the use of common digital technologies, such as the desktop computer, scanner, and inkjet printer. Guyton’s purposeful misuse of these tools to make paintings and drawings results in beautiful accidents that relate to daily lives now punctuated by misprinted photos and blurred images on our phone and computer screens. Comprising more than eighty works dating from 1999 to the present, Guyton’s first midcareer survey features a dramatic, non-chronological design in which staggered rows of parallel walls confront the viewer like the layered pages of a book or stacked windows on a monitor. 

September 27 – November 3, 2012

The exhibition’s title Gaia refers to the Greek earth mother goddess as well as the scientific Gaia Principle, proposing that “all organisms and their inorganic surroundings on Earth are closely integrated to form a single and self-regulating complex system, to maintain the conditions for life on our planet” (James Lovelock). Mi explores the significance of Gaia pictorially, as it relates to today’s ecological challenges. In works such as One -as well as Wind and Water–the artist celebrates and pays homage to the elements in all their glory by examining both microcosms and macrocosms in nature. Mi deconstructs space in the manner of classic Asian landscape painting to present a floating menagerie of symbols – disembodied lanterns, birds, insects, dragons and other hybrid creatures, rich organic matter – looming up from the primordial void. Mi also employs radical shifts in scale and density, subtle hues juxtaposed with jarring color, fluctuating perspective and other dramatic methods to convey her otherworldly vision. Negative space is addressed lovingly and carefully, with as much and perhaps more import than actual objects.

Adam Rudolph – GO Organic Orchestra
Monday, October 1, 2012 @ 8:00 pm

Unique in the realm of approaches to improvisational conducting, Go: Organic Orchestra utilizes a composed non-linear score consisting of sound and motion elements. These include tone rows, synthetic scales, melodies, linguistic shapes, intervallic patterns, textural gestures, modes, ragas, maqams, and plainchant. The score serves to provide material for both the improvisations and the orchestrations. Motion and forms and are generated through the application of the composer’s rhythm concept “Cyclic Verticalism” whereby polymeters are combined with additive rhythm cycles.

September 30 to October 1, 2011

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 30 to October 1, 2011, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 29th. Free and open to the public, and featuring more than 200 exhibitors, the NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, contemporary art catalogs and monographs, art periodicals, and artist zines. Exhibitors include international presses, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, artists and independent publishers from twenty-one countries.

The Thrilling Adventure Hour featuring A staged show in the style of old-time radio with Paul F. Tompkins / Paget Brewster / John Hodgman / Busy Philipps / James Urbaniak

Martha Colburn : Camera, lights, charge, Pop!
Horton Gallery
Sep 28 – Nov 4, 2012

Horton Gallery is proud to announce Martha Colburn’s Camera, lights, charge, Pop! – opening Friday, September 28th in the gallery’s new, expanded Lower East Side location at 55-59 Chrystie Street. Marking the first time that her work has been seen in this capacity, the exhibition will feature an hour and a half program of about thirty manipulated found footage and stop animation films from the mid-1990s to the present as well as Polaroids and large-scale collages.

Collaborations with Marina Rosenfeld, Jason Lescalleet, Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus
Abrons Arts Center
Fri, September 28, 2012 – 8:00pm

The second evening of “Voices and Echoes” presents a series of unique collaborations including Otomo Yoshihide + Marina Rosenfeld duo, Gozo Yoshimasu + Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus trio, and Akio Suzuki + Jason Lescalleet duo.

Bob Log III

Felipe Jesus Consalvos: EXPLODED WHIMS
Vincent Castiglia @Sacred Gallery
LUZ at LaMama
AdA – Author Directing Author
Your Land/My Land
Brooklyn Commons: Martha Rosler and Michael Arcega
Pierce Warnecke + Richard Garret
Slow Boys – Michael Lowenstern and Todd Reynolds
Show #8: Forced Collaboration
Lighthouse / Lightning Rod and Griot New York (excerpts)
Gasland Screening with Council Member Stephen Levin
Carver Audain (Jerome Commission) // Composers Inside Electronics (John Driscoll, Tom Hamilton and Doug Van Nort)
World Maker Faire New York
2011 Digital/Electronic Arts NYFA Fellows Exhibit
Wild Leaves/Nathan Xander
Melanie Daniel: Artist Talk
Art & Law Residency Exhibition 2012
gozoCine: Works by Gozo Yoshimasu
Sonagi Project: Barame Soop
How Can Art Affect Political Change?
Macular Degeneration Reception and Listening Party
My Favourite Things


A Postcard from New Yorkshire New works by Doktor A.
8th Annual AQUAEFEST
Carnival Des Corbeaux
The Para-Architectural Imagination of Gustav Klutsis
Devin Powers, “Paintings”

Paris Commune
Local Report 2012

Adults in the Dark: Avant-Garde Animation (MAD)
The Mountain Goats

WILLEM ANDERSSON at Nancy Margolis Gallery
How to Break

Support this Project: Threefifty Duo.

Threefifty is the amazing guitar duo that made our first Volume shine and now they are getting to work on their 2nd album. Although they’ve already reached their written goal, their true need lies more in the $7000 dollar range, in order to hire musicians and technicians. The project ends in merely 4 days, but you’ll get a sneak peek of what’s in store this weekend when they curate the upcoming 22 playlist!

Help them make something beautiful, DONATE NOW!

The Way Day Collapses from Jennifer Stock on Vimeo.

Support this Project: Glitch Textiles.


Phillip Stearns, creator of Year of the Glitch, is raising money for a new “glitch textile” project that will send these beautiful woven pieces to the Netherlands as well as help raise money for future textile based art. As a self-professed glitch fanatic, I was thrilled to see the amazing colors and shapes that glitch art can create when woven into beautiful, tactile patterns and can only imagine the jagged, neon dreams one would have snuggled under these pixels. Help the celebrate the glitch and DONATE NOW!

SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: Mike Perry’s Wondering About Wandering.


Mike Perry is raising money for a new sort of “open door” art exhibit. If you haven’t been introduced to the electric, neon world of Mike Perry you’re in luck. His current kickstarter project is to raise money for an exhibition that will not only celebrate the culmination of his monograph, Wondering Around Wandering, but also offer a place of interaction, socialization and discussion for local artists. As a bonus you’ll probably get to meet the bevy of adorable dogs in Mike’s kickstarter video and his perks are some of the best I’ve seen with amazing prints at the $20 level and one of a kind wood pieces at the $300 level and above.

We asked Mike to take a few moments and talk a little about the project. Check out his interview below and make sure you DONATE! 

The 22 Magazine: You’ve worked with a lot of folks and brands. What has been your favorite artistic or design experience in New York so far and why?

Mike Perry: Oh man there have been so many amazing collaborations. I love working with Nike and Target. They have been very supportive. I just started working with Duvel and they have been so great to work for. So supportive of the creative world, excited about my ideas and willing to really push the collaborations.

22: You’ve got a few furry friends running around your studio in the video, what’s your dog’s name?

MP: Bass

22: Where will the WAW space be? Where are you looking if you don’t know yet and why?

MP: I have yet to secure a space but I want something big that people can get lost in. A place where you can just wander around and wonder.

22: Where did the WAW title come from?

MP: I just feel like that is what I am doing with my life. Trying to keep my eyes and mind open.

22: Tell us a little more about that tackle box of paint that started it all?

MP: My grandfather Tom was this eccentric artist in Missouri. We had a very funny relationship. He never really took the opportunity to get to know me but I think he knew that I was the person in the family that would keep the prolific journey he started going. I wish I would have had the chance to get to know him.

22: Why did you want your first Brooklyn exhibition to be interactive? What is important to you about have an “open exhibition”?

MP: When I was young my favorite museums where places that you could touch and get lost in the work. A lot of exhibitions are a little stuffy and hard for people to break into. I want my work to feel open and warm. I want to spark the minds of my young audience and show them that they can do this to. But I also want the art connoisseur to remember that there is another way to experience creativity.

22: Why do you think Brooklyn is the best place for this?

MP: I wouldn’t say Brooklyn is the best place for this but I live here so it seems like a great place to start. I would love for this to be very successful and be able to take this on the road to any city that will welcome it.

22: Will you be recording any of the interactions with people at the space?

MP:Big time.

22: What other artists may be working with you on this project or who would you like to ask?

MP: It really depends on how the fund-raising goes. I am going to build a big sculpture with my good friend Jim Stoten that will be on display. And I am working on a zine with a writer friend Francis Parrilli