Repackaged by Richard Garrison

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Repackaged is a continuation of Richard Garrison’s analysis of ubiquitous materials, objects and places from the suburban, often consumer related, American landscape, such as Sunday newspaper sale circulars, parking lot colors, product packaging, Disney World and Wal-mart, among others. Garrison’s recontextualization of aspects of consumer culture affords us a new perspective on commonplace objects, places and experiences. (read more)

Occupy My Slumber Chamber, Wild Bird.

By Robert Herbert

Buzzard pecks the glass pane that frames outsides.

He is pretty pissed about something.


I let him in, he beaksnaps my smoking jacket.

“Say something, you stupid bird, bogle me

less at such an hour as this, the gay sun

is still to galivant this way and you


should be nesting.” He perches on the shelf

for the poetry books and squawks, livid,

stomping now like a trooper. I could kill

him, and as I guage this ill, it becomes clear,


he is comparing the vague emptiness

of my bookshelves to a totalitarian regime.

He wants me to flail freestyle for freedom,

to scorn my propaganda in a false past,

to write better poems, that maybe outlast

links I like, I post, on Facebook, about David Graeber.


Robert Herbert’s debut collection of poems entitled, Pangs! & Intermittences, is forthcoming from Knives Forks & Spoons Press. The poem presented here is an Intermittence. Other works have appeared in Stop Sharpening Your Knives 3 and 4, Kritya, Magma, Gallous, Poetry Proper, Ink Sweat and Tears, Brand, and 3am Magazine. He solicits poems for the e-zine, Digital Behemoth, see http://digitalbehemoth.tumblr.com/ He has performed his poems at Wells Poetry Next The Sea, Flatlake Literary and Arts Festival, The Poetry Library, and The Seamus Heaney Centre.


THE WEEK/WEEKEND: MAY 10-17.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Stephen Hannock: Recent Paintings: Vistas with Text @Marlbourgh

Jacqueline De Jong’s Situationist Times, 1962-1967
http://boo-hooray.com/the-situationist-times/de-jong-situationist-times/
05/09/2012-05/25/2012
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Boo-Hooray is happy to announce an exhibition of original art, publications, photography, ephemera and manuscripts related to Jacqueline De Jong’s vanguard publication The Situationist Times, celebrating the 50th anniversary of its first issue. A total of six issues were published: Issue 1 in May of 1962, and the final issue in December of 1967. A seventh issue was compiled but not published. The Situationist movement produced periodicals: Internationale Situationniste (twelve issues published between 1958 and 1969) and the German Gruppe SPUR publication SPUR (six issues from August 1960 to August 1961). There were other examples: Drakabygget (Scandinavia), Heatwave (UK), Black Mask (USA), King Mob Echo (UK). Dutch artist and graphic designer Jacqueline de Jong joined the Situationist International in 1960. De Jong suggested the publication of an English language newsletter in November of 1960, to be co-edited with British Situationist Alexander Trocchi.

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The 22 V 2/II SIGN & SYMBOL ONLINE NOW!

It is with no small amount of honor that we present the contributors of Vol 2/II: Sign & Symbol. These works are potent and it is with great awe, wonder, shock, respect, and pride that we raise The 22’s banner to pay tribute.

The contributors in Volume 2/II display an uncanny ability to manipulate context. Artists, writers, and musicians often stand at the forefront of cultural change, reflecting visions and revisions of our shared history. The contributors in this volume prove that icons come in many shapes, sizes, and media. At The 22, it is not our job to decide which is more correct, but instead to showcase a spectrum of interpretations. From the brash innuendos of Alexander Barton, the subtle humor of Captain Panda Pants, the visceral statements of Kikuko Tanaka, the humorous apocalypses of Marcus Kenny, the bold words of Nancy Flynn, the pressing urgency of Robert Kulesz, the enduring marks of David Bailin, the mementos and monuments of Kyle Coffin and Joseph Leroux, the clockwork perfection of Emily Ginsburg, the quiet intensity of Edwin Rostron, Mario Kolaric and Thera Webb, the humanity of Jonathan Wood Vincent, the minimalist seduction of James Gallagher, the perfected symbols and sounds of Yuko Otomo and Steve Dalachinksy, the strange surrealities of Derek Larson, the gut-wrecking prose of Ventral is Golden and Damien Knightley, the unabashed beauty of Robert Lucy, to the professed arbitrariness of Colin Oulighan, this volume covers the gamut of symbology and speaks to the underlying notion that we all are highly aware of our public and personal icons-whatever they may be.

Thank you to each and every person who made this volume possible including our generous fundraiser contributors.

~Cat Gilbert, Editor and Publisher

The 22 Volume 2/II: Sign & Symbol (ISSUU version)

The 22 Volume 2/II: Sign & Symbol (Website Version)

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