THE WEEK/WEEKEND: APRIL.

Flowers for Gretchen

Legend Tripping at Masters & Pelavin
Reception April 18, 2013; 6-9PM
Masters & Pelavin invites you to join us for a group exhibition with works by Karl Klingbiel, Timothy Paul Myers, Cecilia Vissers, Peter Buechler, Steven Katzman, Norman Mooney, Vincent Valdez, Jeremy Harris, Tara Fracalossi, Jon Rappleye, Julia Randall, Ruth Hardinger, RAE, Cooper Holoweski and Charles Wilkin.

Smashed at Here (Arts Center): Apr 4-6 @ 7pm
Opera on Tap premieres SMASHED: The Carrie Nation Story, an absurd opera about drinking booze (and the people who don’t drink booze).

VILLA DELIRIUM @Barbes:
April 26th
“Disturbed Songs for Disturbed Times” Villa Delirium combines eerie traditional folk songs of Germany, Ireland and the Balkans with murder ballads of the American South and heir own startling compositions. With Tine Kindermann – Voice, saw and violin; John Kruth – Voice, guitar, mandolin, banjo and flutes; Kenny Margolis – Accordion and keyboards; Steve Bear – Pots, pans and boxes and Doug Wieselman – clarinets and bass harmonica.

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Strange Tales of Liaozhai at HERE (Hanne Tierney.)

by Cat Gilbert

Strings break. They bend. They lead, and they follow (if prompted.) It was physical strings that brought me to Hanne Tierney’s most recent piece “Strange Tale of Liaozhai” at HERE arts center, (as it did many) and it was more metaphorical ones that lead me to learn her rich history as both puppeteer and person. Known for her elaborate puppet rig utilizing (this time) over 114 strings, even Tierney’s herself in an interview for her past work (My Life in a Nutshell) says “80 strings can tangle, can break, can slip out, it’s such a high risk business that I kind of say “Why am I doing this?” Knowing Tierney’s tragic history of losing her son in Sierra Leone and picking up his designated NY space to create a community art gallery (FiveMyles) that has won an Obie for its ability to energize a transition community, it’s easy to see there is very little that truly scares Hanne.

Whether the audience echos the sentiment of “why” or not, they certainly are aware of the elements of “danger” or at least the intricacy involved with watching three dedicated puppeteers manipulate the medieval mechanism (creaky as a ship but with no threat of storm) that Hanne has created. A self-professed “art performer,” who works in galleries as well as theaters, Tierney’s work, while sometimes autobiographical, is also the product of her love affair with Gertrude Stein’s ideal of theater without actors. “Strange Tales of Liaozhai” was aesthetically driven by Stein’s piece “A play called Not and Now,” which employed ball gowns and tuxedos to create a piece which deconstructed the foundations of theater.

“Strange Tales” uses 18th century folktales to tell the stories of a bad trade among a pigeon merchant, and the story of two lovers (one a fox spirit) who struggle for martial bliss. The pigeon piece does so through shadow screens and the hand drawn visual projections of Hannah Wasileski, while the lovers pieces utilizes the inanimate puppet players in the forms of scarves, bamboo, umbrellas and the like. Both pieces were joined by the complex, strange constructions of Jane Wang, who played a setup that rivaled the string mechanism of the puppeteers in its visual interest and sound. The stories though slow, are poignant and worth the patience of watching, however anyone who has seen (or heard) Hanne’s work, knows that a good portion of the engagement of the audience relies on her beautifully subtle, slightly accented narration, and on the puppeteer’s ghost within the machine movements. The genius behind creating something that resembles the interior of a grand piano, complete with string manipulators is almost enough to capture audience for the full hour in itself.

The “new” puppets in the piece (many of Tierney’s older “puppets”-bamboo poles, beaded curtains made appreciated cameo appearances), were mostly the silk scarves which made up the bulk of the cast. The stage itself was cloaked in purposefully laid cloth, and each main character was represented in choice colors, that changed pattern with movement and time across the stage and in the plotline; the overly doting mother in deep reds and pinks, the brash, fickle uncle in blacks and blues, the young lovers in pinks, sky blues and rainbows, and the fox spirit, a satiny silver.

Jane Wang’s setup included a variety of musical instruments (perquisite toy pianos included) but the most interesting moments came when she engaged the “space plates” (metal plates balanced on balloons, balanced in plastic containers), and more simply in her playing of the upright bass which she plucked to create beautiful movement and drama within the puppet pieces. Jamey McGilray and Shawn Lane helped manipulate the puppet strings and did so with a great amount of grace and ease.

“Strange Tales of Liaozhai” the book certainly relies on a great amount of history (with humans or no) to appreciate its tales and appropriately enough Hanne’s work is no different. Woven within the strings she pulls there are connections to both her past apprenticeship at a spinning wheel factory, her ability to see more than mundane in simple machinery, and her choice to move forward even and sometimes because of the great danger within.

Strange tales of Liaozhai runs through September 22nd at HERE Arts Center. Tickets are available here.

Indian Summer.

by Adrian Brooks

Sometimes it seems we’re swimmers, adrift
and, so, guided ashore by moonlight alone.
Strange creatures cast up by midnight tides,
we’re borne on phosphorescent currents
but, once submerged, plumb caverns.

Treasures intact, we resurface on dark water
in a darker night- the zones of ocean or wind
indistinguishable, yet much more mysterious
for our attempts to unravel radial emanations.
Between us, nothing is absent; less left foreign.

Only nuance, a soughing silence seems apparent:
a non-invasive code whereby to sense sea change,
the miniscule cues in which we translate ourselves-
each to each- incarnate, then, through such efforts,
all of which only bring me up to Now.

How long have we loved one another this way?
How far since an ocean alluded to alien coasts?
How deep this sea with its pearls? its sunsets?
How high the moon or its guarantees of dawn?
I ask fathoming only what I find when cast away
to moor again in you.






Adrian Brooks (b.1947) is a poet, novelist and non-fiction writer.
He is also a playwright, a theater artist and a world traveler.
For more information see: adrianbrooksblog.blogspot.com

THE WEEK/WEEKEND: May 31-June 7.

Three Colorists: curated by Michael Walls — Eozen Agopian, Alan Kleiman, Diane Mayo
Where: Lesley Heller Workspace
When: June 6 – July 6, 2012, Opening Reception: Wednesday, June 6, 6-8pm 

Three Colorists, curated by Michael Walls, highlights the work of three artists who have several things in common: they began their professional life as painters; the oeuvre of each importantly involves the role of color; and the work of each is not only labor intensive, but also revealing of a hard-won mastery of the chosen craft.

LABAPALOOZA! MINI FESTIVAL OF NEW PUPPET THEATER FROM THE LAB
Where: St. Ann’s Warehouse
When: MAY 31-JU­NE 3  

It’s the last show before we move to our new location at 29 Jay Street! What better w­ay to say goodbye to 38 Water Street than with our 14th annual Labapalooza Festival? This year’s line-up of works-in-progress ranges from the traditional to the irreverent, from the ground breaking to the nostalgic, and from delightful to downright punk-rock.

Masterpiece Theater Curated by: Geoffrey Young
Where: Morgan Lehman 
When: May 31  - June 30 

If theatrical is the question, masterpiece is the answer.  Modesty in art is over-rated, as anyone with a Schnabel complex knows, so be prepared for the challenge of ascertaining the significance of what these artists have been cooking up over the past four months.  Yes, each can draw, paint, and employ color to bold effect, but that’s of secondary importance (the least we can expect of an artist).  What drives these artists is Imagination.  Another word for imagination is risk, another word for risk is danger, another word for danger is aesthetics.  And aesthetics, as we know, is for the birds.  But these artists aint tweeting.

Thurston Moore + Bill Nace + Joe McPhee
Where: Roulette
When: May 31, 8pm 

Three pillars of the noise and avant-jazz scene collide : Thurston Moore, singer/songwriter/guitarist for Sonic Youth, teams up with free-noise guitarist Bill Nace and avant-jazz saxophonist Joe McPhee for an evening of mind bending cacophony.

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THE WEEK/WEEKEND: May 23-May 31.

AN UPDATE ON GETTING LISTED: 

Hi Folks, we’ve decided to pare down The Week/Weekend listings to a much more condensed version for the summer months.

Why you may ask? A couple of reasons factor into it but the most important being the amount of time it takes to create the listings each week. Even with an automated system, there are hours of work to format and post correctly and although we want to support all creative endeavors in New York, there are A-LOT of them. We feel a more in-depth focus will benefit not only local events but also give us more time to focus on the increasingly wonderful creation of the 3rd volume our flagship publication, The 22 Magazine, as well as allow us to move towards future goals such as the publication of special editions like the upcoming Rule of Three.

On that note, instead of full listings we will start to narrow down the focus to specific event previews, interviews, and reviews. At the end of these listings there will be a link to the events listings page. To get on this page you must enter your event via our events input page. Listings will still come out on Thursdays, and submissions must be made by noon on the prior Wednesday to be considered.

Thanks for sticking by us during this transition, and as always with this transition comes new opportunities. If you are looking for coverage make sure to hit us up at the22magazine (at) gmail (dot) com. We have varying styles and tastes and are always open to interesting ideas. If you are a writer interested in pitching an idea or writing a review please also contact at the email above and we will give you more details.


3 x 3 — A Night of Brooklyn Trios — IRON DOG / THE SOUND BATS / THE REUBEN RADDING GROUP
Where: Freddy’s Back Room
When: May 29, 8pm

Three trios, one night…Iron Dog, The Sound Bats, and The Reuben Radding Group have influences that reach from the far corners of the globe to the mysterious nether regions of the psyche. Filled with electronically manipulated organic sounds, bristly downtown punk-jazz, and traditional Balkan music – get ready for a cosmopolitan night of music that could only be Made In Brooklyn.

Also check out Stuart Popejoy’s (Iron Dog) solo show at The Firehouse Space on May 31.

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The Weekend: Dec 10-11.

SATURDAY:


Vaudeville Park presents…Noir Night
Come out to our 4th Installation of Noir Night, this Saturday at Vaudeville Park. Rare Noir Films & TV, Dark Synth Jazz, Bloody Red Cocktails, Free PopcornVillains of Vaudeville play sullen & dark synth jazz homages to Dark Shadows and Vertigo.

Seven in One Blow – 10th Anniversary Production!
For the tenth consecutive season, Axis Company will present its winter show for children, Seven In One Blow, or The Brave Little Kid. Adapted from the classic fairy tale by The Brothers Grimm, this interactive play with music is conceived by Axis Company and directed by Randy Sharp featuring Axis’ signature blend of advanced technology and live performance. Children in the audience will be encouraged to participate in many of the Kid’s challenges with singing and organized “shout outs.”

A-Lab Forum: ARTE UTIL
centers around the works of artists whose practice involves social and political engagement.  Through actions, performances, situations, and in may instances the reference to the object(s) , participating artists explore possible ways to bridge the gap between audiences and art experience.  Taking as departure the notion of Arte Util (Useful Art), first introduced in the 1960’s , the forum will open the dialogue to offer a possible re-formulation of  ideas behind artistic creation, aesthetics, alternative narratives, and public participation. Selected artists were invited to present their work and share their approach, ideas and experimentation with art that can be found in the streets outside the white box of a gallery or museum setting.

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The Weekend:Dec 2-4.

FRIDAY:

TED BROOKLYN:
We’re living in what is commonly referred to as the “Information Age.” With the emergence of social networks, we build new communities by pressing the “Like” and “+1″ buttons and becoming fans. As we become increasingly interconnected with the Brooklyn community in these new ways, we find ourselves grasping for a new common ethos. In other words, we are striving to refine and define “better.” On December 2 at Brooklyn Bowl, we will address these issues with talks from the best and brightest minds of Brooklyn and beyond.

OPERA ON TAP/Roulette Sisters.
Opera is fun. Most people don’t seem to realize how much fun it really is. In order to prove it, Opera on Tap has taken its act to barrooms where they found out that beer on tap enhances the operatic experience. The company is made up of young singers and instrumentalists who relish the direct contact with audiences not inhibited in their reactions by the looming menace of giant chandelier.The Roulette Sisters have been turning heads and stopping traffic since forming in the cold winter of 2003. Noticing that their warm velvet harmonies and spicy hot licks were melting the snow outside, the sisters realized that they had started something not only weather-altering but soul-stirring as well. The sexy sisters play a hip-shaking blend of American country blues, traditional songs, popular tunes and old timey music from the first half of the 20th century. With Mamie Minch: resonator guitar, Meg Reichardt: electric guitar, Megan Burleyson: washboard, Karen Waltuch: viola.

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THE WEEK/WEEKEND: Oct 3-10th.

“Coonskin 2: Flight to Canada”, a collection of art works by Terrance Hughes
Opening reception: Saturday, October 8th, 6 – 9pm

For Hughes, this upcoming show is a concoction of two inpirations: Flight to Canada, a novel by Ishmael Reed, and Coonskin, an animated film by Bakshi. Flight to Canada tells the story of Raven Quickskill, 40’s, and Leechfield slaves who run away from their master, Mr. Swille, in search of freedom. Coonskin tells the story of Brother Rabbit, Preacher Fox, and Brother Bear, who flee the American South during the 1970s in search of liberation. Using satire, sex, violence, identity, and history to tell the stories of their characters, both Reed and Bakshi make clear that transformation can only come from within—a theme that is the cornerstone of Hughes’ work and that resonates deeply in his life. Consequently, there is “Coonskin 2: Flight to Canada”, which is Hughes’ vision of a sequel that will never happen. The show serves as homage and “thank you” to the great works of Reed and Bakshi and is a representation of Hughes’ love of the lost art of animation. Terrance Hughes was born in 1975 in St. Louis, Missouri, and currently lives and works in New York City. He is a self-taught artist, whose work deals with different periods of Black American history and issues surrounding cultural and social identities. Hughes’ works consist of two elements: graphite and charcoal on paper to create rendered portraits and landscapes from photo references, which are meant to mimic the photo itself, complete with imperfections; and animation Cel Vinyl on acetate, providing stark contrast through its vivid color and three-dimensional effect. It is his belief that the lost art of animation deserves a place in the art world.

Hughes has had recent exhibitions at Modern Eden, San Francisco, The Cheaper Show, Vancouver, and Mad Art Gallery, St. Louis. In March, Hughes participated in a group show to benefit Japan relief at graphite., Williamsburg.

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THE WEEK: SEPT 6-9.

WHITE SWALLOW READING SERIES: B.C. EDWARDS LL BEN FAMA LL ELY SHIPLEY @ CORNELIA.
Tuesday, September 6 · 6:00pm - 7:30pm

B.C. EDWARDS lives in Brooklyn. He is the recipient of the 2011 Hudson Prize put out by Black Lawrence Press which will be publishing his collection of short fiction, The Aversive Clause in 2012 and his collection of poetry From the Standard Cyclopedia of Recipes in 2013. His work can be found in Red Line Blues, The Sink Review, Food-i-Corp, Hobart and others. His short story “Illfit” is being adapted into a piece by the Royal Ballet of Flanders. BEN FAMA is the author of the chapbook Aquarius Rising (UDP 2009) and NEW WAVES (Minutes Books). He is the founding editor of Supermachine Poetry Journal. His work has been featured in GlitterPony, notnostrums, LIT, Poor Claudia, and on the Best American Poetry Blog, among others. He has contributed tips to gawker, words to urban dictionary, and has an ongoing correspondence with Lady Gaga. ELY SHIPLEY’s first book, Boy with Flowers, won the 2007 Barrow Street Press book prize judged by Carl Phillips, the 2009 Thom Gunn Award, and was a Lambda Literary Award finalist. His writing appears in the Western Humanities Review, Prairie Schooner, Diagram, Gulf Coast, and elsewhere. He holds a PhD in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of Utah and currently teaches at Baruch College, CUNY. Hosted by Angelo Nikolopoulos $7 cover includes a house drink.

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