SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: Mike Perry’s Wondering About Wandering.

DONATE TO WONDERING ABOUT WANDERING. 

Mike Perry is raising money for a new sort of “open door” art exhibit. If you haven’t been introduced to the electric, neon world of Mike Perry you’re in luck. His current kickstarter project is to raise money for an exhibition that will not only celebrate the culmination of his monograph, Wondering Around Wandering, but also offer a place of interaction, socialization and discussion for local artists. As a bonus you’ll probably get to meet the bevy of adorable dogs in Mike’s kickstarter video and his perks are some of the best I’ve seen with amazing prints at the $20 level and one of a kind wood pieces at the $300 level and above.

We asked Mike to take a few moments and talk a little about the project. Check out his interview below and make sure you DONATE! 

The 22 Magazine: You’ve worked with a lot of folks and brands. What has been your favorite artistic or design experience in New York so far and why?

Mike Perry: Oh man there have been so many amazing collaborations. I love working with Nike and Target. They have been very supportive. I just started working with Duvel and they have been so great to work for. So supportive of the creative world, excited about my ideas and willing to really push the collaborations.

22: You’ve got a few furry friends running around your studio in the video, what’s your dog’s name?

MP: Bass

22: Where will the WAW space be? Where are you looking if you don’t know yet and why?

MP: I have yet to secure a space but I want something big that people can get lost in. A place where you can just wander around and wonder.

22: Where did the WAW title come from?

MP: I just feel like that is what I am doing with my life. Trying to keep my eyes and mind open.

22: Tell us a little more about that tackle box of paint that started it all?

MP: My grandfather Tom was this eccentric artist in Missouri. We had a very funny relationship. He never really took the opportunity to get to know me but I think he knew that I was the person in the family that would keep the prolific journey he started going. I wish I would have had the chance to get to know him.

22: Why did you want your first Brooklyn exhibition to be interactive? What is important to you about have an “open exhibition”?

MP: When I was young my favorite museums where places that you could touch and get lost in the work. A lot of exhibitions are a little stuffy and hard for people to break into. I want my work to feel open and warm. I want to spark the minds of my young audience and show them that they can do this to. But I also want the art connoisseur to remember that there is another way to experience creativity.

22: Why do you think Brooklyn is the best place for this?

MP: I wouldn’t say Brooklyn is the best place for this but I live here so it seems like a great place to start. I would love for this to be very successful and be able to take this on the road to any city that will welcome it.

22: Will you be recording any of the interactions with people at the space?

MP:Big time.

22: What other artists may be working with you on this project or who would you like to ask?

MP: It really depends on how the fund-raising goes. I am going to build a big sculpture with my good friend Jim Stoten that will be on display. And I am working on a zine with a writer friend Francis Parrilli

Interview with Jonathan Beer.

By Max Evry

Through crisp technique and counterintuitive juxtapositions, Jonathan Beer’s art straddles the line between illustration and full-blown abstraction, often side-by-side. His emphasis is on decay and motifs of memory, with each piece attempting to conjure the reality of the mind, something like a Polaroid snapshot of his mental state.

Fresh off earning an M.F.A., Beer was recently awarded a summer residency in Leipzig, Germany, and he’ll be holding a solo show called “Landscape Revisited” at the Ferst Art Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology from May 17-June 30. His M.F.A. Thesis show at the New York Academy of Art opens on the 15th of May from 6-8pm.

We talked to Beer at his studio in New York about his process, and how it is aided by an intuition that is producing truly striking imagery.

Max Evry: Do you ever look back at a piece and find you’ve overdone it, went one or two steps too far?

Jonathan Beer: Oh yeah, all the time. Learning to not paint is one of the hardest things to do. I remember talking to one of the instructors here about that, and someone told him that a mature artist knows when to not paint. After he said that I started to think about that when I compulsively reach to make a mark on something I hadn’t touched in a while. It’s like, “Wait, is this right?” Now if I’m not sure I let it sit, and a lot of time when
I get the urge to do something it’s because I just want to work, so I’ll just start something new at that point. I get that energy out and it protects the other stuff from a possibly destructive decision.

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An Interview with Pranas T. Naujokaitis.

By Max Evry

Pranas T. Naujokaitis (pronounced Nigh-O-Kite-Us) has been my friend for something like a decade. We both went to the same high school, are both obsessive comics nerds, I even helped name his cat “Ripley,” after the heroine of “Aliens.” It was apparent to anyone with eyeballs in front of their face that the guy was destined to become a cartoonist of epic proportions, but when Pranas announced that his first major published work was going to be a children’s book titled “The Totally Awesome Epic Quest of the Brave Boy Knight,” it took more than a few people by surprise, myself included.

“Here’s the problem: I have a very kid-friendly style but I don’t do kid-friendly stuff.” he tells me,”In “Inkdick” I draw myself in the shower with my cartoon penis a lot and deal with adult situations. Just don’t tell your kids to go to that site.”

“Anyone who’s seen how you draw noses pretty much knows how you draw a cartoon penis,” I reply.

After a long pause, Pranas sighs, “Yeah.”

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An Interview with David Meiklejohn (My Heart is An Idiot).

David Meiklejohn is the co-creator and director of the film, My Heart is an Idiot (2011), documenting the travels and relationships of Found Magazine creator Davy Rothbart. Found  is dedicated to showcasing items (mostly notes and pictures) found and sent in to the magazine from around the world. In the interview David talks about My Heart is an Idiot, working and creating with Davy, and gives his own advice on love. This interview originally took place in the late summer of 2011. My Heart is an Idiot is being released on DVD this April and will screen this Thursday in Houston, Texas. For more information on the movie visit their facebook page or watch the trailer.

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AN INTERVIEW WITH KRISTIN SKEES.

THE 22 MAGAZINE: You work focuses on a series called cozies, which are nearly full body knitted coverings for humans. What was the inspiration for this project?

KRISTIN SKEES: In undergrad, I started out as a photo major, and then swiftly fell in love with making things and experimenting with materials. I switched to sculpture. At the time, it felt like the most encompassing specialty for me. I felt pretty limitless as far as what materials and forms I could play with. I did a lot of metal-casting, fabrication, and ceramics but the themes I’ve been pulled to have always been about home, identity, and the social constructs of those two things. As I transitioned into graduate school, I began to play with fiber, installation, and performance/video. At first, I experimented with quilting and embroidery, which were two things I learned from my mother and grandmother, and the materials began to feel more in tune with the ideas I was working with. I taught myself to knit and crochet using an old book I found at a thrift store. (This was before youtube, and before the internet was full of crafters – I’m so jealous of how easy it is to learn these things from experts online these days). The process of knitting was intriguing to me, but I was really more interested in the idea of using it as a covering and what meaning I would derive and exploit from that.

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Ugly Art Room presents, All That Remains @ Picture Farm.

Artist and curator, Charles Wilkin took the time to chat with The 22 about the upcoming collage show All That Remains presented by Ugly Art Room at Picture Farm in Brooklyn. Resourcing from a VAST pool of collage artists, the show is dynamic, bold and most of all, really fun. The show opens Oct 21st, with an reception from 7-9pm at Picture Farm (338 Wythe Ave.)

The 22 Magazine: You happen to be a collage artist yourself, correct? Tell me what it is that first got you hooked on collage and what you love about it?

Charles Wilkin: Yes I’m a collage artist. It’s funny because I sort of fell into collage by accident in college. I was late for a drawing class and forgot to bring my pencils and paper. I ran across the hall with nothing more than a stack of photos I’d just printed from my photo class. Instead of smacking my hand with a ruler for being unprepared my instructor said ” well use those photos”. Clearly she saw something in what I had done that day and encouraged me to make more collages. I guess what I love about collage is it’s immediacy and the happy little accidents that happen along the way. I love not knowing where I’m going until I get there and with collage I can sort of get lost in the moment. I think that’s what I really love about it most, for me it’s very freeing.

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VOL 1: AN INTERVIEW WITH APRIL GERTLER.

The month of September is devoted to Vol 1 contributors April Gertler and Dolores Alfieri. April contributed an amazing interview to Vol 1 and you can give it a read below in its entirety or on the magazine site at: http://www.the22magazine.com/Pages/AprilGertler.html

THE 22 MAGAZINE: Why did you choose to live and work in Berlin?

APRIL GERTLER: I finished graduate school and had done an exchange program in Germany and Frankfort at an art school there, and I was sort of weighing my pros and cons. I had always wanted to live in Europe. My father’s from Hungary, and my mother’s from Holland. I thought about living in Holland, but having this chance to be in Frankfort had been really exciting, and Berlin has always been this kind of city of promise. Berlin is really exciting and just offers so much. There is so much vastness and openness. There is still this feeling of opportunity, but the opportunity is very much there for you to develop yourself, which is what I also find really difficult about living in Berlin. There is a huge positive, but the huge negative is that there’s not a lot of energy coming from the city. What I mean is, here, in New York, you walk on the street and there’s sort of this vibration. There’s this buzz because there are so many people in the street; you feel people’s energy and get electrified from that. It doesn’t exist in Berlin. It’s a very slow city. It’s very calm. That is why I really like it, although, it’s very hard to get motivated. So, there’s this challenge with the city.

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