Flowers for Gretchen

Legend Tripping at Masters & Pelavin
Reception April 18, 2013; 6-9PM
Masters & Pelavin invites you to join us for a group exhibition with works by Karl Klingbiel, Timothy Paul Myers, Cecilia Vissers, Peter Buechler, Steven Katzman, Norman Mooney, Vincent Valdez, Jeremy Harris, Tara Fracalossi, Jon Rappleye, Julia Randall, Ruth Hardinger, RAE, Cooper Holoweski and Charles Wilkin.

Smashed at Here (Arts Center): Apr 4-6 @ 7pm
Opera on Tap premieres SMASHED: The Carrie Nation Story, an absurd opera about drinking booze (and the people who don’t drink booze).

April 26th
“Disturbed Songs for Disturbed Times” Villa Delirium combines eerie traditional folk songs of Germany, Ireland and the Balkans with murder ballads of the American South and heir own startling compositions. With Tine Kindermann – Voice, saw and violin; John Kruth – Voice, guitar, mandolin, banjo and flutes; Kenny Margolis – Accordion and keyboards; Steve Bear – Pots, pans and boxes and Doug Wieselman – clarinets and bass harmonica.

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One Night Stand: A Biblical Epic on Mastication

By David Moody

Lord, forgive all my foxiness. Remember us humans, us cruising
to nightclubs and not braking to dead stop, us stepping—
no hand rail—in black pumps and boot-cuts up to the slut box
then forgetting to dance. Us keeping secrets. Our leaving no tip.
Sometimes in a good fuck I speak carpentry—spackle and jack
tape, Jesus rib, caulk. I awoke this morning naked as a jay bird. Buzzed,
wearing glasses, I held on to no one but my body pillow, Sacagawea,
keeping her warm. Almost a godsend, God, almost.

I confess I want guidance. Guide me to the country of Charity,
that hard-knuckled woman, her deep ankle boots. Can she have red
hair or is black a must? I imagine her hips as I often do hips—chisels
and axes that hack at a crowd thralled to some DJ.
This woman shapes through body’s rhythm her own thrumming
god. Fox beast, incisors, torso warped thing. Its own twisted shape a way
of confessing. To choke without a throat, slowly, on praise.

From what is this thing we have gnawed happiness? How
has it tasted all of our lives? God of Smudged Chins. God of
Half-Virgins. We wedge fingernails into the gaps between backboard screws
and corner beams. With a wonderful quickness we know bed as world.
God, what I’m saying is that I suspect heaven
was planned with a right hand drawing blueprints on napkins,
the left hand still-buried in some idle fur.

Forgive me but nightclubs are like your mouth, like my bedroom
with its ceiling too low. The off-kilter whir of fan blades replace
any belief in collar-starch morals. Forgive the room’s stucco.
Forgive the drunk nothings this tile floor revibes. No,
nothing’s wrong with yesterday’s meats. Sometimes, though, I am
little more than gaps found between words—good and then
morning. A click-click that lingers. I cannot tell if its high heels or teeth.
If I am flea, Lord, and not a fox, I insist one thing: you must bite, hard.

David Antonio Moody writes out of Tallahassee where he pursues a PhD in poetics at FSU. Former poetry editor for SawPalm and Juked, David is production editor of Cortland Review and Southeast Review. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Sweet, Eleven Eleven and Spillway.

How to Break at HERE.

Above: Dan Domingues as Aden and Amber Williams as Ana

         How to Break, HERE’s most recent production, centers on the revolving story of a doctor, 2 patients (one with leukemia, the other with sickle-cell anemia) and a well-meaning artist in residence at a hospital. The show, while focusing on hip-hop, freestyle culture, more complexly focuses on the decision facing a person, particularly a young person, with a fatal disease and a moment of “breaking” for both strength and freedoms sake.
         The show itself is incredibly well suited for adolescents (highly recommend for high school classes,) slightly dull at times for the older crowd, but Jafferis writing is fast paced, funny, if never completely emotionally raw. Part of this may be the nature of utilizing freestyle throughout the piece. While this is definitely a central component in understanding a big part of the “break” of the piece, at times it makes difficult moments funny or more lighthearted than necessary. For anyone who has had, or known someone with cancer, you can’t help but wonder when the true “break” is going to happen and think that when it does…it’s probably not going to rhyme. That being said, grain of salt included, we all cope in our own ways and Christopher V. Edwards says in the director’s note “Everyone involved in the initial collaborative process has been inspired by hip-hop. Some of us breathe it and eat it for breakfast….” so it’s hard to fault her for utilizing freestyle throughout the piece that is based on it. Likewise, the age of the patients also make the flirtatious insult on the playground behavior more realistic and the piece itself, written in part by actual hospital patients through the Mixing Texts Collective project, does speak to Jafferis claim to portray “breaking” as “inspiration, courage, and possibility.”
         The standout actors included Dan Domingues and Amber Williams who portray both the over involved doctor (a bit of a fantasy no doubt) and leukemia ridden Ana, popper, design student, and love interest of Joel played by Perdro Morillo, a professional break dancer who is admirably comfortable in his first acting role.
         The set, a series of medical curtains that range from translucent to opaque were used to highlight the beatboxer Yako 440, playing a nurse character who provided beatbox accompaniment (written by Adam Matta) and sometimes comic relief, as well as the canvas for graffitiesque sketches. Yako 440 definitely could have been utilized more fluidly with the other characters on stage. One of the most interesting moments comes at the start of the play when he tells Ana to “breathe” into the microphone and creates a series of loops from it. And while the setup was interesting and the cast navigated the curtains flawlessly, the opening and closing did at times get distracting. Likewise one wanted to see more physical moments to accompany the soundtrack which was often lost behind the curtains.
         Overall this piece feels like a very dynamic moment set within the context of a beautiful but sometimes misunderstood artistic culture, as well as the experience of facing mortality head on. What is lacking is visceral emotion, is often made up for in surprising moments of writing and acting, and it’s this combination that speaks to the strength of the creators and the cast.


THE WEEK/WEEKEND: September 28-October 4.

Sunday, September 30th
Dixon Place

  • Cabaret star, Justin Vivian Bond will sing for us
  • Chef Amanda Freitag will present the food offering.
  • Painter John Devaney will share his beautiful work, which captures the endless parade of life.
  • Brooklyn Express Drumline will energize with their rhythms.
  • Charlotte Booker will make a New York poem with the assembled crowd. We’ll play a game of New York trivia…

And, of course, there will be storytelling, live music, community, art and LOTS of clapping. What more could you want out of a Sunday morning? Come celebrate the city with us. Oh, and feel free to bring something tasty for the refreshment table!

OCTOBER 4, 2012–JANUARY 13, 2013
The Whitney

Over the past decade, New York–based artist Wade Guyton (b. 1972) has pioneered a groundbreaking body of work that explores our changing relationships to images and artworks through the use of common digital technologies, such as the desktop computer, scanner, and inkjet printer. Guyton’s purposeful misuse of these tools to make paintings and drawings results in beautiful accidents that relate to daily lives now punctuated by misprinted photos and blurred images on our phone and computer screens. Comprising more than eighty works dating from 1999 to the present, Guyton’s first midcareer survey features a dramatic, non-chronological design in which staggered rows of parallel walls confront the viewer like the layered pages of a book or stacked windows on a monitor. 

September 27 – November 3, 2012

The exhibition’s title Gaia refers to the Greek earth mother goddess as well as the scientific Gaia Principle, proposing that “all organisms and their inorganic surroundings on Earth are closely integrated to form a single and self-regulating complex system, to maintain the conditions for life on our planet” (James Lovelock). Mi explores the significance of Gaia pictorially, as it relates to today’s ecological challenges. In works such as One -as well as Wind and Water–the artist celebrates and pays homage to the elements in all their glory by examining both microcosms and macrocosms in nature. Mi deconstructs space in the manner of classic Asian landscape painting to present a floating menagerie of symbols – disembodied lanterns, birds, insects, dragons and other hybrid creatures, rich organic matter – looming up from the primordial void. Mi also employs radical shifts in scale and density, subtle hues juxtaposed with jarring color, fluctuating perspective and other dramatic methods to convey her otherworldly vision. Negative space is addressed lovingly and carefully, with as much and perhaps more import than actual objects.

Adam Rudolph – GO Organic Orchestra
Monday, October 1, 2012 @ 8:00 pm

Unique in the realm of approaches to improvisational conducting, Go: Organic Orchestra utilizes a composed non-linear score consisting of sound and motion elements. These include tone rows, synthetic scales, melodies, linguistic shapes, intervallic patterns, textural gestures, modes, ragas, maqams, and plainchant. The score serves to provide material for both the improvisations and the orchestrations. Motion and forms and are generated through the application of the composer’s rhythm concept “Cyclic Verticalism” whereby polymeters are combined with additive rhythm cycles.

September 30 to October 1, 2011

Printed Matter presents the seventh annual NY Art Book Fair, from September 30 to October 1, 2011, at MoMA PS1, Long Island City, Queens. A preview will be held on the evening of Thursday, September 29th. Free and open to the public, and featuring more than 200 exhibitors, the NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, contemporary art catalogs and monographs, art periodicals, and artist zines. Exhibitors include international presses, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, artists and independent publishers from twenty-one countries.

The Thrilling Adventure Hour featuring A staged show in the style of old-time radio with Paul F. Tompkins / Paget Brewster / John Hodgman / Busy Philipps / James Urbaniak

Martha Colburn : Camera, lights, charge, Pop!
Horton Gallery
Sep 28 – Nov 4, 2012

Horton Gallery is proud to announce Martha Colburn’s Camera, lights, charge, Pop! – opening Friday, September 28th in the gallery’s new, expanded Lower East Side location at 55-59 Chrystie Street. Marking the first time that her work has been seen in this capacity, the exhibition will feature an hour and a half program of about thirty manipulated found footage and stop animation films from the mid-1990s to the present as well as Polaroids and large-scale collages.

Collaborations with Marina Rosenfeld, Jason Lescalleet, Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus
Abrons Arts Center
Fri, September 28, 2012 – 8:00pm

The second evening of “Voices and Echoes” presents a series of unique collaborations including Otomo Yoshihide + Marina Rosenfeld duo, Gozo Yoshimasu + Tamio Shiraishi + Cammisa Buerhaus trio, and Akio Suzuki + Jason Lescalleet duo.

Bob Log III

Felipe Jesus Consalvos: EXPLODED WHIMS
Vincent Castiglia @Sacred Gallery
LUZ at LaMama
AdA – Author Directing Author
Your Land/My Land
Brooklyn Commons: Martha Rosler and Michael Arcega
Pierce Warnecke + Richard Garret
Slow Boys – Michael Lowenstern and Todd Reynolds
Show #8: Forced Collaboration
Lighthouse / Lightning Rod and Griot New York (excerpts)
Gasland Screening with Council Member Stephen Levin
Carver Audain (Jerome Commission) // Composers Inside Electronics (John Driscoll, Tom Hamilton and Doug Van Nort)
World Maker Faire New York
2011 Digital/Electronic Arts NYFA Fellows Exhibit
Wild Leaves/Nathan Xander
Melanie Daniel: Artist Talk
Art & Law Residency Exhibition 2012
gozoCine: Works by Gozo Yoshimasu
Sonagi Project: Barame Soop
How Can Art Affect Political Change?
Macular Degeneration Reception and Listening Party
My Favourite Things


A Postcard from New Yorkshire New works by Doktor A.
8th Annual AQUAEFEST
Carnival Des Corbeaux
The Para-Architectural Imagination of Gustav Klutsis
Devin Powers, “Paintings”

Paris Commune
Local Report 2012

Adults in the Dark: Avant-Garde Animation (MAD)
The Mountain Goats

WILLEM ANDERSSON at Nancy Margolis Gallery
How to Break

THE WEEK/WEEKEND: September 6-13.

VALERIE HEGARTY: Figure, Flowers, Fruit
Nicelle Beauchene Gallery
September 9, 2012 – October 21, 2012

In this exhibition, Hegarty takes her point of departure from themes of consumption, lust,reproduction and greed. Playing with traditional still life and figurative painting, Hegarty cites as inspiration the cult comedy Little Shop of Horrors along with current newsheadlines concerning the enhancement and mutilation of body and food. These four new paintings metamorphose sculpturally, as the paintings burst, grow and propagate in bodily gestures, leading the overgrowth to travel ominously beyond the canvas boundaries.

Strange Tales of Liaozhai
Friday, September 7
HERE Arts Center

Through choreography and manipulation, master puppeteer Hanne Tierney conducts an intricate counterweight system of over 100 strings, transforming a full stage of inanimate objects into the players of two emotionally charged tales.

Nancy Davidson: Dustup
Betty Cunningham Gallery
9/6/2012 To 10/6/2012

Betty Cuningham Gallery is pleased to open its 2012-13 season with Nancy Davidson, featuring her inflatable sculpture, Dustup. This will be the artist’s first exhibition at the Gallery. The artist will be present for the opening reception. Davidson, a sculptor and video artist, is known for her unique media – larger than life inflatable sculptures – and for her interest in American icons and gender issues. In 2005 with the support of a Creative Capital Grant, she began her exploration on the myth and reality of the cowgirl. After researching western women’s history Davidson focused on the rodeo cowgirl.

Thomas Allen: Beautiful Evidence
Sep 9 – Oct 14, 2012
Foley Gallery

Allen’s signature use of cutting and repurposing book illustrations has not vanished. Instead of the pulp fiction genre, Allen plays with 50’s era versions of clean cut youths and domesticated moms. His unmistakable talent for creating the illusion of 3D in photography with his deft cuts and crimps, establishes a magical world in which a boy and girl play tag creating their own kind of electricity, a milkman makes a very special delivery in space, young toughs play marbles with the solar system and a mother busily sews her own version of “string theory.”

David Stoupakis/Matthew Bone
September 8th – October 19th
Last Rites Gallery

David Stoupakis is an internationally recognized painter who creates eerie portraits of beings that appear wise beyond their years. The self-taught artist adds both haunting imagery and grim fairytale-like elements to his work to juxtapoz childhood innocence with macabre surroundings. InAshes to Sorrow, his new collection of drawings and oil paintings, David creates a continuation of his previous body of work-Walking with These Shadows./With his new work, Matthew Bone continues to explore the visual language he created as a child when massive unmonitored media consumption informed his worldview. A latchkey kid from an early age, pornography, comic books and movies formulated his ideas of sexuality, masculinity, and femininity- in essence reality and perception were sculpted by imaginary worlds steeped heavily in sensationalistic imagery.

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By Joanna Valente

Something fell on Lincoln Ave / Mammoth teeth

in rock salt in lime in a whale’s belly / a wooden

chair breaks under weight /

Paid $25 for avocado n’ fish n’ yucca n’ lemons

to feed humans saying / don’t let me be lonely 1

when the tonality shifts / it is easier to be

evasive than to tell any truth /

& lack of truth can be blamed on brokeness

2 yrs ago was 2 yrs ago / not unremembered

in teeth / in tonal changes / over

landmasses, sea-stuff / Still I carry his name

in my cervix / at night peeling my eyes like onion

skinning off lost papers / they disappear /

hope they disappear / Cannot dream anything

in color except scribbled words (who’s biography?) /

red ink that writes don’t let me be

1.Claudia Rankine, Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, An American Lyric

Joanna C. Valente is a MFA candidate in Poetry Writing at Sarah Lawrence College, where she is also a part-time mermaid. She founded and currently edits Yes, Poetry. She can be found at

1. Where The Light Was

By Terra Brigando

In the split second stitching when night greets the dawn, in that
seam, is where the pain resides. Shining white as teeth, this enamel
stutters open the day, creaks open this guilt. We sing as miniature
stuntman, flinging our bodies through the apologies of the afternoon,
the slight off-kilter yawning of space in the blue, blue sky. Sling
madness through evening, dust off that fine linen. The rooms we reside
in now we call home. Through the opening of atoms at nightfall,
splitting off of cells, we create what we do not know in the
moonlight. Tell your lovers to quit forsaking the dawn and your family
to carry forward the dead humbly and with purpose. For it’s our love
basking there in the streetlights; it’s your jaw that’s wishing
forward these words.

Terra Brigando recently received her Masters in English and Creative writing from Mills College. Her previous work can be found or is forthcoming in Fogged Clarity, apt, decomPFourtyOunceBachelors, Chamber Four, and Word Riot.

An Interview with Adam Niklewicz.

by Jade French

Adam Niklewicz plays with the relationship between identity and nationality with a slice of sausage in the middle. Removing our typical relationship with food (eat and run) Niklewicz forces the viewer to reimagine how we can view food with everything from beautifully rotating chicken bones to musical sausages! His sculptures are multi-faceted creations which resituate objects outside of their normal habitats. We caught up with the artist to find out more…

Jade French: How does your relationship with both Poland and America inform your work?

Adam Nikelwicz: On one hand, there’s the visual vocabulary of my Polish childhood, on the other – the American pop-cultural and commercial iconography. The two clash and blend together (there’s a bit of smoke) and all this occasionally produces some creative leaven.

JF: Do you think through creating art you gain a sense of identity? Or does art incorporate a universal feeling, which negates nationality?

AN: I’d dread to hear that my art is somehow ethnic, hermetic or obscure. True, I often base it on quirky, ethnic, folkish facts but I do hope I’m able to distill these facts into works with universal appeal.

JF: Can you explain more fully how ‘Romantycznosc is a reflection on the Polish psyche? How did you create that piece of work? Its amazing that the sound is so pitch perfect when made out of meat!

AN: It’s hard for me to explain the Polish psyche notion (other than through art itself), I know though it reaches its peak when a Pole plays a polonaise on the instrument. Putting this piece together took a lot of effort and a lot of sausage.  And there were these frequent (up to three times a day for a few weeks) visits to my local Polish deli, which confused the store clerk.  My appetite for always the same mundane kind of sausage, the shear amounts of the product purchased, the fact that I’d often produce a tape measure from my pocket to check on the sausage’s length before buying – all this made the clerk uneasy.  I fought against the instinct of explaining myself.  I decided that the explanation (I’m not really weird, I’m only making a musical instrument out of sausage) would not boost my image with the man. In other words, I enjoyed the process and misperceptions it produced.  The process has recurred several times since with other projects.  What makes the piece utter the right kind of sound must remain a secret.

JF: One thing that strikes me is the manipulation of found objects into functioning equipment- like the Art Forum kaleidoscope. How important is it that your art has a function, as well as an aesthetic value?

AN: I want my work to both look good and to possess content.  Yes, I need my objects to function, but their purpose must not adhere to an easy logic.

JF: Is the Art Forum piece a comment on art journalism? I noticed you cut the visuals from the review sections out- how much do art reviews affect an artist?

AN: Perhaps it’s a comment on the nature of art.  I truly believe that art is ever-changing (like the kaleidoscope effect used here) and ever-fresh (not unlike nature itself).

JF: Do you think using microscopic visuals forces the viewer to look harder at your artwork, or engages them in a different way?

AN: A small object of art feels precious, like a piece of jewelry. I noticed that people gladly focus their attention on a small work. They feel encouraged to wrap their minds around it.

JF: Would you classify your work as playful?

AN: I’m very happy when someone calls my work playful.  I’m equally happy when viewers find it humorous.

JF: Pieces such as Ounce have a strong sense of nostalgia and poignancy- does this piece relate directly to personal experiences?

AN: I love that you misspelled the title of this piece!  The actual title – ONUCE, stands for a garment of sorts – two pieces of fabric or paper (often a newspaper) designated to be wrapped around feet, usually in addition to socks.  All this for an extra protection against cold.  I suspect the term made the title partially because it looked like a misspelled English word (e.g. ONCE, OUNCE).  I used to wear onuce as a child.  Big time!

JF: Pieces such as Calle Lunga’ and Monument to Borscht, although stationary, seem to incorporate a sense of movement- is that something you recognize yourself?

AN: These two pieces are not really built to last.  They appear to face the imminent prospect of collapsing, breaking, sagging. I think, this is where the sense of movement comes from; their fragile nature implies change and change is related to movement.

JF: The kinetic sculpture Chicken Souphas a sense of frailty to it – what do you think this piece is trying to say?

AN: I like fantasizing about that chicken I consumed. I assembled its bones in a rather aerial manner.  I wonder- is this transformed bird on the verge of taking off?

JF: Why is there a link between food and heritage within your work?

AN: Food is a visible, tactile, sensuous (and surprisingly meaningful) way of experiencing a cultural heritage.

JF: I also read that you ate paint as an art student, which relates to the piece of bread with orange oil paint – can you tell us the story and why you recreated this moment later in life?

AN: The incident happened many years ago during a drinking party of a bunch of 17-year old art students – all ready, perhaps even certain, to conquer the artworld.  In my own drunken stupor, I spread orange oil paint over a slice of bread and challenged everyone to take a bite.  Nobody did!  Meanwhile, I put myself on the spot and now I had to have a good chunk of the slice.  The long forgotten incident returned to me quite suddenly, and made me realize that the then display of adolescent stupidity was in fact an act of commitment. A vow. I’m the only participant of that gathering from he past that keeps making art.  I recreated that ‘action’ now to renew the old vows.

For more about Adam visit his website.