LOVE IS BLIND @ Littlefield this Wens.


In Search Of Singles

Love Is Blind, a show that’s half cabaret and half live dating game, seeks singles to play the game. They have the cabaret part down, but the show needs you on-stage answering outrageous questions, as the audience witnesses the spectacle.

Hosted by Sarah Sims Erwin (aka: DJ Sims, and formerly with The Fun Club), Love Is Blind features more than the dating game. It’s got the lovable song stylings of Finsbury Park and Lady Adrienne; the twisted dance theater group Movementpants Dance; and a little something balloon-y by the host. And after the show, dance to Love Is Blind’s resident DJ, Blind Eye Sees All. Proper footwear = rug cutting bliss.

$5 admission gets you a Love Lottery ticket which gives you a chance to play (or give your ticket to a friend to better their chance to win). Contestants will be picked live at the event.

Spread the word. Spread the love.

For more information, visit www.loveisblindnyc.com or Facebook www.facebook.com/loveisblindnyc

SPECIAL OFFER:
If you RSVP to their Facebook event you get a Sims-made Love Is Blind button.

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=220174487992988

Love Is Blind
at Littlefield
this Wednesday, May 11
622 Degraw Street
Gowanus, Brooklyn  11217
$5
doors at 7:30 pm; show at 8 pm

Mary Frank/R. Wayne Reynolds/Mark Grotjahn/Michael Williams

MARY FRANK : TRANSFORMATIONS @ DC MOORE.
Opening reception: Thursday, May 5, 6:00-8:00 PM

Wood Sculpture, 1957-1967
and Recent Photographs
May 5-June 4, 2011
MAP

As always, Mary starts with observation and moves towards myth.

– Hayden Herrera

DC Moore’s new exhibition of Mary Frank’s work, Transformations: Wood Sculpture, 1957-1967 and Recent Photographs, features her dynamic wood sculptures, direct carvings from the 1950s and 60s that marked her emergence as one of the most innovative artists on the New York art scene. The exhibition also presents drawings from the same time, vibrant figures that both complement her sculpture and expand the range of her explorations of space, motion, and the rhythms of the human body. This is the first exhibition of these seminal works since they were originally shown over forty years ago. VIEW FULL PRESS RELEASE.
Continue reading

SUPPORT THIS PROJECT! PRISM INDEX & PROJECT NEON.

Two new projects filtering through the feed that caught my eye. One is the handiwork of Jeffery Bowers, THE PRISIM INDEX. Limited edition, handmade, silkscreened, mixed-media book complete with images (DVD) and sound (CD) featuring a gratuitous amount of artists. It’s the kind of project most editor’s cringe at and you’ve got to admire not only the quality of the work but the sheer gumption of the undertaking. Not to mention the interesting Kickstarter video. See a tour of the mag itself below.

DONATE HERE.

Continue reading

Historic Gastronomy @ Brooklyn Brainery.

HISTORIC GASTRONOMY classes complete with hints of political undertones and a sprinkling of vintage cookbook porn at Brooklyn Braniery start May 3rd. Read below for more info and CLICK HERE  to sign up.

Instructor: Sarah L.
Cost: $50
Meeting Schedule: Three Tuesdays, May 3, 10, and 17, 8:30-10:30pm
Semester: May 2011

In this course, we will explore the day-to-day cooking of the past 200 years: tasting; talking; and extracting inspiration from the past to inspire contemporary cooking. In this three-part course, you’ll become familiar with the popular flavors and recipes of different eras, then learn how to interpret historic and vintage recipes for a modern day kitchen.

Part 1: A Timeline of Taste

A Timeline of Taste will explore the history of American food through flavor: we’ll travel from 1796-1950, making a pit stop every 50 years to explore the tastes of a particular time. You’ll be allowed to smell and sample the spices, fruits, extracts, and other ingredients that defined the flavors of different time periods. From rosewater to vanilla; nutmeg to cinnamon; citron to reddi-whip, we’ll discuss why each of these flavors were popular and how they were used in day to day cooking.

Part 2: Iconic Dishes

What was being cooked in the kitchens of American can reflect the politics and popular culture of an era. Looking at the past 200 years, we’ll explore iconic recipes from each time and discuss why each was popular: including the legends behind them and the technology that made them possible. We’ll taste each of these recipes and talk about what they represented to families, communities and culture.

Part 3: Re-writing Recipes

In our final session, participants are invited to bring in their own vintage cookbooks and handwritten recipe cards from the past as we learn how to interpret historic recipes. We’ll unveil tricks to modernize these recipes for today’s kitchen: how to interpret amounts, flesh out directions, find comparable ingredients and most importantly, learn how to pull inspiration from these recipes to create unique contemporary dishes.

http://brooklynbrainery.com/courses/84-historic-gastronomy