Delta by Leif Solem.

Three boys stand in a river.
One boy’s name is Never.
He glows like a lover.

They skip stones and try rhymes.
Second one’s name is Sometimes.
Into a hollow tree he climbs

and there he stays.
Last boy’s name is Always.
One boy stands in a river.

Leif Solem was born in New York City. He lives in Spokane, Washington, where he plays music on street corners when the weather permits.

READ “They Say He’s Gone Completely.”

The Week: June 6-10.


June 5-11

Vision Festival 16Arts For Art, Inc. presents the 16th annual Vision Festival, New York City’s premier multidisciplinary celebration of innovative jazz music, dance, poetry, and art, held for its third year at the Abrons. Critics have described it as “arguably the most important free-jazz fest in the U.S.” (Peter Margasak, Chicago Reader), and stated that “avant-garde jazz culture has no better colloquy in this country than the Vision Festival” (Nate Chinen, The New York Times).

Each year, the Vision Festival honors the achievements of one living artist who has greatly influenced the world around them and paved the way for other innovators to move forward. On Wednesday, June 8, Arts For Art and The Vision Festival will celebrate a Lifetime of Achievement by Peter Brotzmann. This great improviser was one of the first practitioners of the Free Jazz movement in Europe. Brotzmann has programmed his own evening in such a way that it would reflect his ongoing pursuit of musical innovation. This 70-year-old artist is not interested in looking back — only in looking forward and being as creative as possible in the present.

Visit visionfestival.org for more information and listings of Vision Festival events at satellite sites. (SEE FULL SCHEDULE.)

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Kara Walker at Lehmann Maupin/Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

 

Lehmann Maupin Gallery in collaboration with Sikkema Jenkins & Co.,is pleased to present, Fall Frum Grace, Miss Pipi’s Blue Tale, a joint exhibition of new works by Kara Walker, on view 21 April – 4 June, 2011 at 201 Chrystie Street. At Lehmann Maupin Gallery, Walker will present three new video works, which draw on her own experience in the Mississippi Delta, “a region mythologized in song and popular culture but tragically depressing.” She explains, “I drove down to the Delta thinking about the terrors of Jim Crow and slavery, yet the silent indifference of the landscape and the economic stasis, lack of mobility, and the persistence of a racist memory in the area was what stuck.”

The exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Dust Jackets for the Niggerati-    and    Supporting    Dissertations,    Drawings submitted ruefully by Dr. Kara E. Walker, will feature new graphite drawings and hand-printed texts on paper. This body of work grew out of the artist’s search for understanding of the way that power asserts itself in interpersonal and geopolitical spheres. As she embarked on this quest the figural elements began to disappear from her work. Now, they emerge again in what Walker describes as a “giddy embrace” of the figural and the narrative.

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