What it does.


 By Shanita Bigelow


               I am not a man.
               Were there a place for this kind of truth, it would rest like a hand at rest, only as heavy as
it tends/needs to be.
There are numbers and signs and bedposts and other treasures left for streetwear.
            In your mouth I found a mound                          and in time it will uncover itself, reveal
the buried, your ancestry kept beneath, sublingual and integrating, sublingual and dissolving,
sublingual, making its way through your vessels, shining light in new space, building mounds of elbow
and knuckle, pancreas and gallbladder, your eye.              It is not what it does,
not the purpose of a purpose anymore; rather, a guise—calm teeth compelled to mercy and
your eye, the one made of dried tubers               and plantains, the one well versed in the forsaken,
the sacred. In your palm a repository for yes.
                                                                                                                      Yes.                              Yes.         Yes.
There is a shaker being shaken at this very moment and could you hear, you might dance or fright,
you might swallow or listen.              Shake then. The answers you seek exist not in the cumbersome
notes, the copious, not in all those hands, your eye, but in the flavor, the flavor of yes and/or
thank you.               Yes, thank you.
                   If salmon were a gun and smoked, how would you maneuver                        the catch, gesture,
maneuver fork and knife through barrel and flesh—scaled is the freshness of our decrees for the
sanctity, for the answers.                     And life can exist in new measures, line after line after line after. Do
not forsake the smoked gun, the smoking salmon, the smoke.
                                                                                                                    What you’ve left of me today is more
than enough for two. Maybe, I said. Maybe.               Keep in mind what you keep in isolation. There are
carts for this kind of mercy. Call it fear or something like it or not. Call it anything but sorrow
because sorrow does not exist. Not as it should.                                                                    Instead
we are left to want for more and watch the bleeding, the smoking, crying out for another and
another and another, our tongues lost in a cannon, combustible and ugly, grimy like how you said
you’d be there.                               Watch as the pain rejects any exposure to this that does not exist.
Have we forgotten? Again                         and there is another line, more/mere mercy and other things
like webs or candor or a golden rhyme.                                                      Memories are stacked, steeped
                                                                          in what we know of it and then.




Shanita Bigelow, originally from North Carolina, currently resides in Chicago where she works and writes. She has work published or forthcoming in the DAP Journal, NAP and African American Review.

THE WEEK: Nov 7-11.

MONDAY:

Paul McCarthy, The Dwarves, The Forests 
Hauser & Wirth New York is proud to present an exhibition of major new works by Los Angeles-based Paul McCarthy, one of America’s most challenging and influential artists. Comprising bronzes, a massive tour de force wood carving, and a pair of fantastical landscape maquettes all presented on the gallery’s two floors, ‘The Dwarves, The Forests’ is the first exhibition of sculptures to emerge from McCarthy’s recent exploration of the famous 19th century German folk tale Snow White (Schneewittchen) and the modern interpretation of that story in Disney’s beloved 1937 animated classic film ‘Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs’

AMRAM & CO @ Cornelia St.
David Amram, piano, french horn, flutes, composition & surprises; Kevin Twigg, drums, glockenspiel; John de Witt, bass; Adam Amram, percussion

With Liberty and Justice for Some: How the Law Is Used To Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful
OCD Lecture Series
Stress and the Individual Litigant: Managing the Practical and Emotional Aspects of Litigation and Exploring Alternatives Zombies Identified – (Re)Considering the Monster #2
Harmony Holiday & Jared Stanley
Abigail Washburn
Evolving Music #5 – Remembering Raphe Malik
Occupy: Presented by n+1 and Housing Works
FALL DOWNTOWN: SEASON PARTY
Robert Graham
LINDEMANN YOUNG ARTIST DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
League of Professional Theatre Women 

TUESDAY:

Listen to This by Alex Ross
Listen to This—which collects Alex Ross’ finest writing for The New Yorker since 1994—is that rare book that moves across the entire landscape of music, from classical to rock and back again. In this series of lively, erudite essays, Ross tells of his own late-blooming discovery of pop, and of how contemporary sounds relate to centuries of musical tradition. He vividly sketches canonical composers such as Schubert, Verdi, and Brahms; gives us in-depth interviews with modern pop masters such as Björk and Radiohead; and, in a previously unpublished essay, brilliantly retells hundreds of years of music history—from Renaissance dances to Led Zeppelin—through a few iconic bass lines of celebration and lament. Witty, passionate, and brimming with insight, Listen to Thisshows how music expresses the full complexity of the human condition.

The Moth StorySLAM. Theme: Warning Signs
Global Capitalism: A Monthly Update & DiscussionKIRSTIN KAPUSTIK, AMANDA HINCHEY, ALISA FENDLEY, MARI MEADE MONTOYA & FRANCINE ELIZABETH OTT
DANA SCHUTZ “If the Face Had Wheels” book signing and discussion with Barry Schwabsky
Rescue Me!
Balzac’s Omelette
Lonely Dear
CAN MOTHERS STOP TERRORISM?
ICONOMANCY

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In the Door Art Fair and Is it Fine Art, Does it Matter? : The Pen and Brush

Founded 117 years ago, The Pen and Brush, Inc. is an international membership organization for women in the visual, literary and performing arts and supporting public members. The Pen and Brush is a vibrant resource for its members, nonmember participants, and a flourishing cultural center for the surrounding community.

The Pen and Brush’s archives (1894 – 1934) are stored on microfilm in the Archives of American Art. Click here for information on accessing these records.

Call for Entry

Two Artist Opportunities:

Art Fair / Exhibition

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In Door Art Fair

Entry Deadline:  May 20th, 2011
The Pen and Brush announces our first In Door Art Fair. For two weekends this spring in conjunction with our upcoming exhibition, Is It Fine Art?  Does It Matter? artists will have the opportunity to rent an area of wall space; space for installation art or sculpture; and/or table space to exhibit, display, and sell their work to visitors.  This opportunity is open to all professional level art in all media, and all types of craft.

1st Weekend:  Memorial Day Weekend

Sat. May 28th, 11am-5pm

Sun. May 29th, 11am-5pm

2nd Weekend:

Sat. June 4th, 11am-5pm

Sun. June 5th, 11am-5pm

Click Here for Rental Options and Fees

Pen and Brush Members receive a 10% discount on rental fees.

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Is It Fine Art?  Does It Matter?

An Exhibition Challenging Tradition

Deadline Extended:  Friday, April 22th, 2011

Announcing New Dates: May 26th – June 26th, 2011
Is It Fine Art?  Does It Matter? is looking for works that challenge tradition.  Curated by gallerist and auctioneer Kenneth Hutter and auction appraiser Jennifer Elhardt, this exhibit will explore artistic expression outside the canon of “fine art.”
Open to all media, including:

  • Craft, (all forms:  mixed media, fiber, jewelery, wearable art)
  • Painting
  • Drawing
  • Photography (all forms:  commerical, digital, etc.)
  • Book illustration
  • Set design (project elements, or drawings)
  • Furniture
  • Architectural Design (project elements, or drawings)
  • Decortative Arts
  • Sculpture
  • Mixed media
  • Collage
  • Fiber
  • Installation
  • Video/film
  • Assemblage
  • Glass
  • Wood
  • Metal
  • Enamel work
  • Ceramics

There are no size restrictions on any work.

Click here to enter online or for details