THE WEEKEND: MARCH 30-APRIL 1st.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Drew Maillard Solo Show: “Living In Interesting Times”
http://www.mfgallery.net/DrewMaillard/DrewMaillard.html
03/31/2012-05/05/2012

MF Gallery, fine purveyors of the eccentric and bizarre, are proud to present the collected works of one of their own. “Living In Interesting Times” is an exhibition of the drawings, paintings, prints and sculptures of Drew Maillard. There is an ancient Chinese curse that goes “May you live in interesting times.” Drew Maillard was born and raised in America in the last quarter of the 20th century… A fascinating era to be sure. He is a product of his environment. Nature and nurture; habitat and conditioning combined. Drew’s adolescence was divided between comic books, horror and sci-fi films, and fantasizing about girls he didn’t talk to. Also there was Punk Rock and L.S.D.. After spending some time in the army and leaving his hometown in upstate NY, he received his Bachelor Of Fine Arts degree from SVA in 2000. His life experiences and travel, as well as an interest in scuba diving and ju-jitzu is what informs Drew’s crazy crazy artwork.

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THE WEEKEND: MARCH 2-4.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Liz Biddle, Regine Granne, and Katherine Tzu-lan Mann at A.I.R. Gallery
http://www.airgallery.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=main.artists&artistid=885
03/01/2012-03/24/2012
6pm-9pm

This exhibition showcases Biddle’s continuing interest in mixed media, with a twist of humor found in much of her work. Old wires, light bulbs, screws and other found objects protrude from holes in ceramic objects, while creature-like robots – strange, disturbing and endearing – appear in collages and drawings. Liberty is a contemplation of the present in the wake of 9/11. The Statue of Liberty itself simultaneously represents an overused icon and a diminishing concept. These works offer a means of viewing such images and enable reflection of our world, our nation, our politics, our person, our perspective, and our relationship to all. Mann’s large paintings in Root, created by combining chance stains with highly rendered decorative elements on oversized, un-stretched paper, function as human-sized portholes into a landscape alive with minute details, patterns and interlocking systems.

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THE WEEK: Dec 5-9.

MONDAY:

Photographing the Dead: The History of Postmortem Photography from The Burns Collection and Archive
Postmortem photography, photographing a deceased person, was a common practice in the 19th and early 20th centuries. These photographs, from the beginning of the practice until now, are special mementos that hold deep meaning for mourners through visually “embalming” the dead. Although postmortem photographs make up the largest group of nineteenth-century American genre photographs, until recent years they were largely unseen and unknown. Dr. Burns recognized the importance of this phenomenon in his early collecting when he bought his first postmortem photographs in 1976. Since that time he has amassed the most comprehensive collection of postmortem photography in the world and has curated several exhibits and published three books on the subject: the Sleeping Beauty series. Tonight, Dr. Burns will speak about the practice of postmortem photography from the 19th century until today and share hundreds of images from his collection.

FIRST BOOK BROOKLYN HOLIDAY PARTY & FUNDRAISER
first book–brooklyn is a nonprofit organization dedicated to getting new books to children in need.  join us tonight for their first annual holiday party and fundraiser.

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THE WEEKEND: SEPT 23-25.

KRONOS QUARTET: Awakening: A Musical Meditation on the Anniversary of 9/11

Part of the 2011 Next Wave Festival
Sep 21—24, 2011 at 7:30pm 

Pioneering contemporary music ensemble Kronos Quartet (More Than Four, 2007 Next Wave) returns to BAM with a heartfelt program comprising 12 compositions—including works by Michael Gordon, Terry Riley, Osvaldo Golijov and Gustavo Santaolalla, and John Oswald—plus gripping arrangements of traditional songs from around the globe. This stirring collection of works reflects upon those instances where traditional language fails us, and music steps in to restore what violinist David Harrington refers to as “equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.”

Read the full program here.

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THE WEEK: AUGUST 15-19.

PROJECT FUKUSHIMA! BENEFIT CONCERTS @ THE STONE.
8/15 Monday  8 and 10pm

PROJECT FUKUSHIMA! BENEFIT CONCERTS
John Zorn, Ned Rothenberg (sax) Uri Caine, Shoko Nagai, Karl Berger (piano) Ikue Mori (electronics) Ha Yang Kim (cello) Nels Cline, David Watson (guitar) Yuka Honda (keyboards) Satoshi Takeishi (drums) Shayna Dunkelman (percussion) Chuck Bettis, Michael Carter (electronics) Kato Hideki (bass) and many special guests!
TWO SPECIAL SETS OF IMPROVISED MUSIC AS PART OF A WORLD-WIDE INITIATIVE FOR THE LAND AND PEOPLE OF FUKUSHIMA. ALL PROCEEDS WILL GO TO PROJECT FUKUSHIMA!—TWENTY DOLLARS

THIS NIGHT WILL BE BROADCAST LIVE OVER WEBSYN RADIO BY DOMINIQUE BALAY—THE LINK http://droitdecites.org/2011/06/08/websynradio-en-direct-de-the-stone-new-york-fukushima/

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The New York International Fringe Festival
Friday, Saturday and SundayFringeNYC? The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America, with more than 200 companies from all over the world performing for 16 days in more than 20 venues. In addition to 1200 incredible performances, FringeNYC includes…..(READ MORE.)


Maya Zack: Living Room

The Jewish Museum
July 31, 2011 – October 30, 2011

In the installation, Living Room, artist and filmmaker Maya Zack uses large-scale computer-generated 3D images accompanied by sound to evoke a Jewish family’s apartment from 1930s Berlin. While listening to the stories and memories of Manfred Nomburg, visitors can experience the apartment visually. 3D glasses enhance the oversized images reimagining rooms in the apartment and give them immediacy and depth.

Everybody Loves the Monster!
Thursday, August 18, 2011, 10 a.m.

In 1818, when Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus was published for the first time, Mary Shelley could not have imagined the monster she was unleashing on the world. The creature in Shelley’s novel is remarkably sympathetic and an eloquent speaker, capable of measured, intelligent, and articulate argument.  But based on Boris Karloff’s 1931 film performance and confirmed by countless other films, comics, and illustrations, the general perception today is that Frankenstein’s creature is a “monster” who grunts or speaks—if he talks at all—in disjointed monosyllables.

Why has popular culture largely denied the creature his reasonable voice? This symposium brings together four scholars and the curator and bibliographer of The New York Public Library’s Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection to reflect on graphic and film representations of the “monster” from the past two centuries. The first half of the day will feature presentations on key visual adaptations of the creature, while the latter half will engage questions about what these appearances mean for understanding him as a political and historical subject.

Yana Dimitrova and Angela Washko: Cheap Paradise of Familiar Tasks and Places
Opening reception: August 19th, 6:30 pm on
Flux Factory 

Consider escaping your common, everyday tasks and places without using your common, everyday devices. Through installation, painting, drawing, and video, Yana Dimitrova and Angela Washko portray the mundane patterns and structures of everyday experience and consider models of living that exist outside of our “to-buy-is-to-gratify” mentality. Stripping fast food architecture and smart phone technology of it’s branding and context, Washko and Dimitrova present what remains – hollow monuments to consumer culture.

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The Weekend: July 29-31.

A Celebration of The Battle for Mau Mau Island

Saturday, July 30

9:30 pm – late

SWIMMING CITIES in collaboration with SEA WORTHY present: A Celebration of The Battle for Mau Mau Island with Rusty Lazer (New Orleans, Bounce.), Dirtyfinger (Black Label), Geko Jones (Que Bajo?.) and Barney Iller (Rubulad).

Last weekend the naval gangs of New York assembled to Battle for Mau Mau Island (see photos here).  Come see the fallen soldiers, harvested booty, and glorious victors at a new two-story space in Bed-Stuy. Mau Mau gangs, gladiator raft jousting, cocktail catacombs, clothing optional watergun fight, underground casino & film screenings of eerily beautiful movies set on the water, slide show and videos of the battle, and an awards presentation for the victors.  Wet & wild all night long.

$5 for gangs in matching costumes, Mau Mau vets, or before 11pm, $10 otherwise; 21+.

All proceeds go directly to the Swimming Cities India project.

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WATER LANDSCAPES/SUSPENDED ENERGY
PAUL BOBKO @ KLOTZ GALLERY.

July 7th-August 19th.

In his magnum opus, Gravity’s Rainbow, Thomas Pynchon introduces us to the German concept of Brenschluss in the telemetry of the flight of the V2 rocket. The rocket is propelled by its engines and travels along its parabolic arc.  At a certain point the engines turn off, this flameout is called brenschluss. At brenschluss the rocket’s ascendancy is checked by gravity, and before it begins to fall to its target on earth, it hesitates for just a moment.  After this moment gravity and momentum alone, not a rocket engine, define the inexorable trajectory of descent to its inevitable, calamitous  end. (READ MORE.)

CONEY ISLAND: 40 YEARS, HARVEY STEIN
KLOTZ GALLERY

July 7th-August 19th.

Harvey Stein has been a fixture on the New York photo scene for many years.  He has photographed the city from every angle with every kind of camera, at every time of day and night.  Beyond these shores he has led photographic seminars and workshops all over the world…He’s gone everywhere, and for the last 40 years he’s been going to Coney Island…where New York City flows into the Atlantic Ocean at the end of Ocean Avenue, in Brooklyn.

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