THE WEEK: MARCH 12-16.

EDITOR’S PICKS: 

Fiction Magazine 40th Anniversary Celebration
http://www.housingworks.org/events/detail/fiction-magazine-40th-anniversary-celebration
03/15/2012-03/15/2012
7pm-

Celebrate the new issue and Fiction’s 40th anniversary with contributors Sheila Kohler, Jerome Charyn, Brendan Kiely, and Kesi Foster.

OPERA ON TAP.
http://barbesbrooklyn.com/calendar.html
03/16/2012-03/16/2012
8pm-

OPERA ON TAP. Opera is fun. Most people don’t seem to realize how much fun it really is. In order to prove it, Opera on Tap has taken its act to barrooms where they found out that beer on tap enhances the operatic experience. The company is made up of young singers and instrumentalists who relish the direct contact with audiences not inhibited in their reactions by the looming menace of giant chandeliers.

Kris Kuksi
http://joshualinergallery.com/index.php
03/08/2012-04/07/2012
11pm-6pm

With its cautionary title, Triumph skewers the hubris and folly of human ambition. This cavalcade of epic works references mythology, the occult, and organized religion, and uses age-old techniques of visual storytelling to voice personal angst. Depicting grand themes with extravagant embellishments, Kuksi’s assemblages of small, mass-produced materials are intrinsically narrative. Like gilt Baroque altarpieces, their stunning excess of detail is the ideal vehicle for the artist’s critique of power and piety. And like those early works of public art, they appeal to the viewer to transcend the strife and striving associated with greed.

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Hirotaka Suzuki.


Perhaps I am painting the cruelty of contemporary life because it is in opposition to my naïve outlook.  In contrast with the physical features of my paintings, I think I am visualizing my feeling of anxiety in contemporary life.  Though I do not think I am fully aware of the relationship between this cruelty and my anxiety, I represent this unsure feeling as figuratively as possible, and I am trying to figure it out in my painting.  Although there are some prominent aspects of our contemporary world, such as commercialism and materialism, I cannot say who my enemy is.  Some of the threats might involve the art world, however to protest such issues overtly does not suit my personal outlook.We cannot live in a developed society unless depend on its complex social rule.  Following the rules and social values provides us stability.  However, each of us creates exceptions, unstable rules and changeable standards.  These double phases never unite, and I do not think they should be.  I am really interested in these dilemmas and focus on these realities actually.  This ambiguity may be my starting place and the reason I engage cruelty in my artwork.  There does not appear to be a universal justice or evil in the present world.  We need a grayer position in order to stay peaceful.  In other words, I believe the dilemma of today’s morality, which is different from that of yesterday am, surely has helped develop my insight.  Thus, my message cannot be a negation or an affirmation.  My attitude in my artwork is a reflection of what the contemporary world is to me; my painting is my introspective confession.  I believe I am making right artwork.

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Bedevilment In Paradise @ Proteus Gowanus Opening this Sat.

Bedevilment In Paradise

   

Opening Reception: Saturday, April 16, 7-9m

PROTEUS GOWANUS

DIRECTIONS

For our last exhibition of the Paradise year, we focus on Bedevilment, in collaboration with our friends at Curious Matter, who will install an exhibit within the exhibit entitled The Naming of the Animals.

Myth says that naming the animals is an obligation assigned to humankind at the creation and it is one that has never ceased to demand attention: the task of naming, ordering, cataloging, dividing, pairing, discerning, describing, speaking…. Indeed, Paradise itself, where naming first began, was a place divided and separated, which is why its beatific presence bedevils us. As the exhibitions at Proteus Gowanus and Curious Matter attest, these paradisiacal topics are vexing.

We are bedeviled by threatened harmony, endless desiring,  dangerous magic and unhinged innocence, all on view in the works of 19  artists, writers , designers and collectives. Also in store is the Spring line-up of evening events with musicians, scholars, priests, dancers, filmmakers, historians and writers.

The exhibit at Proteus opens this Saturday and will run through July 16. The show at Curious Matter opened on April 3 and closes May 15. For details on Naming the Animals and directions to Curious Matter, click here.

Contributors: Sally Agee, Diane Bertolo, Peter Bonner, Jessica Cannon, Stella Chasteen, Enome Ekeh, David Eustace, Nancy Friedemann, Anne Garland, Madhu Kaza, Edith Kollath, Paula Lalala, Clarinda Mac Low, Walter Polkosnik, Eaton Purdy, Leon Waller, Cate Whittemore, A Wrecked Tangle Press, and The Writhing Society.

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In addition, we are pleased to host this spring two Paradise projects-in-residence. In the work of Madhu Kaza’s Here Is Where We Meet and Clarinda Mac Lowe’s Cyborg Nation, we examine the relationship between intimacy and service, domestic ritual and public space, and between our human selves and the smart machines which serve and guide us.

Cyborg Nation extends our recent inquiries into future utopias,  offering Teknotherapy for all who need help coping with their increasing dependence upon electronic gadgets. Have you fully accepted your cyborg nature? With Teknotherapy, a Cyborg interlocutor (or “teknotherapist”) leads group and individual sessions during April and May for those of us grappling with our machinic selves, helping us to come to terms with our relationships with our electronic extensions. For more details or to make an appointment, click here.

For our second project, Here is Where We Meet, Madhu Kaza will travel to individual participant’s homes by appointment to read them to sleep at bedtime. Here is Where We Meet is part of the artist’s ongoing Hospitalityseries, projects that examine social conventions, rituals of domestic and daily life, relations between strangers, hosts and guests, and boundaries of public and intimate space. Here is Where We Meet is particularly concerned with the transitional state between wakefulness and sleep, the drift from the world of stories to the world of dreams, and a re-engagement of the pleasure of voice in our experience of texts. More details will be available soon.