THE WEEK: Sept 26-30.

LIVE from the NYPLROBERT WILSON with Rufus Wainwright, Lou Reed, Lucinda Childs, and others in conversation with Paul Holdengräber 
Friday, September 30, 2011 7:00 p.m.

Robert Wilson will talk to Rufus Wainwright, Lou Reed, Lucinda Childs and others about his artistic collaboration with them over the years.  The conversation will be instigated by Paul Holdengräber.

Robert Wilson is among the most distinguished theater directors of our time. Creator of such works as The King of Spain and The Life and Times of Sigmund Freud, Wilson also collaborated with Philip Glass on the hugely successful opera Einstein on the Beach. Today, Wilson’s accomplishments are recognized not only in the spheres of theatre and opera, but also in the visual arts. Retrospectives of his work have been held throughout the world, and his installations have appeared in several Guggenheim museums, among other venues worldwide.

This event marks the US publication date of The Watermill Center – A Laboratory for Performance – Robert Wilson’s Legacy, a new book about the first 20 years of The Watermill Center.  It will also feature the new book Robert Wilson From Within edited by Margery Arent Safir.

Organs in The Snow
Opening Reception: Sep 30, 8-11pm

A Group Show and Story by Rachel Mason

Dan Asher / John Baldessari / Michael G. Bauer / Michael Bilsborough / Nancy deHoll / Jen Denike / Tim Dowse / Ellie Ga / Laleh Khorramian / Jason Lazarus / Mamiko Otsubo / Samuel White

Opening Night Performances: Thank You Rosekind, Doom Trumpet, No Sky God, Mark Golamco

She was a lion sitting on her dad’s shoulders. They formed a totem of two heads, one large, one small as they walked down the street. Powerful with her lion-painted face, she stuck her tongue out at a man passing by. He tripped on the side of his foot and then fell to the ground.

The girl’s father didn’t realize that his daughter scared the man, causing him to fall. The man already had a fear of children. The girl’s father also didn’t realize that had he reached his hand out to help, the man wouldn’t now have two permanent rods conjoined in his hip bone, and wouldn’t have lapsed into a permanent hallucinatory state from which he’d never recover.

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THE LADY CHEESE SHOP @ MICHAEL MUT.

THE LADY CHEESE SHOP 

April 28 – May 1, 2011

Thursday April 28, 7pm-10pm OPENING TASTING EVENT
Friday, April 29, 5pm-9pm
Saturday April 30, 1pm-5pm
Sunday May 1, 2pm-6pm CLOSING TASTING EVENT at 4pm

“From one perspective, a cyborg world is…about the final appropriation of women’s bodies in a masculinist orgy of war. From another perspective, a cyborg world might be about lived social and bodily realities in which people are not afraid of their joint kinship with animals and machines, not afraid of permanently partial identities and contradictory standpoints. The political struggle is to see from both perspectives at once because each reveals both dominations and possibilities unimaginable from the other vantage point. Single vision produces worse illusions than double vision or many-headed monsters.”

– Donna Harraway, Cyborg Manifesto

Image of Human Cheese at Michael Mut Art Gallery, New York

On Thursday April 28 Miriam Simun transforms the exterior of Michael Mut Gallery into The Lady Cheese Shop, inviting visitors inside to taste Human Cheese, cheese made from human milk. Inside the gallery Simun depicts an exploration of the complex and messy truth of what it means to make food from human body products. Visitors will move from imaginary fantasy of such a proposal to the very real process of procuring virus-free human milk, and turning it into cheese. Three delicious different human cheeses will be available (made from the milk of three different women), accented with food pairings inspired by the terroir of each cheese, created by Chef Sarah Hymanson. Over cheese and wine participants will be invited to consider and discuss this immodest proposal.

In creating Human Cheese, Simun raises questions about the ways in which biotechnology progress transforms the possibilities for the human body as a site of production and commodity, through a radical reframing of the possibilities of urban food production. Technologies that make use of the body in strange and intimate ways come to be accepted by societies and markets for their life-giving promises. Amidst a crisis of our food systems, the use of hyper-local reproductive excess located here in New York City offers a real possibility to ‘give life.’ By inviting participants to taste human cheese, Simun appeals to the full range of human senses to consider this proposal.

Human Cheese is Miriam Simun’s final work as a part of NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. www.miriamsimun.com

MICHEAL MUT GALLERY 

MAP