The Weekend May 20-22.


False Idols:Al Wadzinski Convergent Evolution: Deborah Simon

Reception May 20; 7-9pm

May 19, 2011 through June 19, 2011

NY Studio Gallery is pleased to present Al Wadzinski’s third solo show in New York. Wadzinski’s False Idols refer to the predominantly Judeo-Christian concept of idolatry, the worship of a physical object as a god. Here these carefully assembled icons are comprised of humanity’s abandoned cast-offs, the remnants of our bloated consumer culture now repurposed as inert fetish objects. The centerpiece of the exhibition revolves around a massive golden calf, referencing the Old Testament story, but this god-proxy’s body is a shopping cart filled with gold-painted bones, its undeniably bovine head an amalgam of odd parts ranging from boots to a Christmas tree stand. (READ MORE.)

LZ Project Space is pleased to present Convergent Evolution, a solo sculpture exhibition by Deborah Simon. Inspired by viewers miscatagorization of Simon’s animal sculptures, she began to group together her pieces along those lines – also known as convergent evolution. This exhibit contains both king penguins and northern fur seals, both animals that have arrived at seemingly alike solutions for locomotion despite coming from different and unrelated ancestries. Simon’s animals float between taxidermy, toy, and art object; their life-sized bodies represent hours of meticulous multi- processed work in the form of sewing, molding, and painting of their almost ethereal clay faces. (READ MORE.)

 

Hiroshima: Ground Zero 1945 @ICP.

MAY 20–AUGUST 28, 2011
MAP 

After the United States detonated an atomic bomb at Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, the U.S. government restricted the circulation of images of the bomb’s deadly effect. President Truman dispatched some 1,150 military personnel and civilians, including photographers, to record the destruction as part of the United States Strategic Bombing Survey. The goal of the Survey’s Physical Damage Division was to photograph and analyze methodically the impact of the atomic bomb on various building materials surrounding the blast site, the first “Ground Zero.” The haunting, once-classified images of absence and annihilation formed the basis for civil defense architecture in the United States. This exhibition includes approximately 60 contact prints drawn from a unique archive of more than 700 photographs in the collection of the International Center of Photography. The exhibition is organized Erin Barnett, Assistant Curator of Collections. (READ MORE.)

The Super Coda presents: DUCK CALLS AND HALLELUJAHS!

FRIDAY 5/20. 8-midnight.
8 – Duck That! w/Steve Norton/Angela Sawyer/Josh Jefferson.

Ducks are sometimes confused with several types of unrelated water birds with similar forms, such as loons or divers, grebes, gallinules, and coots. The word duck (from Anglo-Saxon duce), meaning the bird, came from the verb “to duck” (from Anglo-Saxon supposed *ducan) meaning “to bend down low as if to get under something” or “to dive”, because of the way many species in the dabbling duck group feed by upending (compare Dutch duiken, German tauchen = “to dive”). Duck That were once seen in the same room as Paul Whiteman, although they’d deny it if asked. Angela Sawyer, electronics and game calls, etc… Josh Jefferson, reeds and game calls, etc… Steve Norton, reeds and game calls, etc…

Then Starting at 9, The Super Coda welcomes Yva Lass Vegass, Tooth and Wail, and The Molasses Gospel! They are all touring together. Come Support!

http://www.reverbnation.com/themolassesgospel
https://www.facebook.com/toothandwail

DONATE TO SUPER CODA SOUNDPROOFING ON KICKSTARTER!

22 VOL 1 CONTRIBUTOR JOHN JENNISON @ GREENPOINT GALLERY SALON SHOW
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The 22 Magazine contributer John Jennison will have work this Friday, May 20th at Greenpoint Gallery’s Spring Juried Show.

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=101072903317023

http://www.thegreenpointgallery.com/

http://www.the22magazine.com/Pages/johnjennison.html

MEET THE FILMMAKERS OF LOST BOHEMIA

Filmmakers in person Fri-Sat at 7:00pm!
Movie Screenings:
Fri, May 20 at:
3:20 PM, 5:15 PM, 7:00 PM, 8:50 PM, 10:35 PM
Sat, May 21 at:
 
3:20 PM5:15 PM7:00 PM8:50 PM,10:35 PM

For over a century, Carnegie Hall rented affordable studios to residents like Marlon Brando, Paddy Chayefsky and Isadora Duncan. As a privileged tenant himself, director Astor began to record his neighbors, witnesses to decades of artistic history. But when the landlord served everyone with eviction notices for a conversion to offices, his project became a chronicle of the battle to save the apartments and their rich heritage. (READ MORE.)

Cortlandt Hull with figure of his great uncle, Henry Hull, "The Werewolf Of London"

The Witch’s Dungeon
Cortlandt Hull with figure of his great uncle, Henry Hull, “The Werewolf Of London”

An illustrated lecture and show and tell with collector, artist, and proprietor of “The Witch’s Dungeon” Cortlandt Hull
Date: Friday, May 20th
Time: 8:00 PM
Admission: $5
Part of 
Out of the Cabinet: Tales of Strange Objects and the People Who Love Them,presented by Morbid Anatomy and Evan Michelson

Friday, May 20th may be a dark and stormy night. Brave souls normally catch the coach at midnight from the Borgo Pass to access the lawless and far off lands of Bristol, CT, spoken about in hushed tones as the home of the Witch’s Dungeon. But on this rare occasion the stars have aligned and like the Baba Yaga’s chicken-footed cabin, the Witch’s Dungeon is coming to Observatory! (READ MORE.)

The Believer Presents QNA: The Art of the Interview
Celeste Bartos Forum, Saturday May 21, 1:00-3:00 pm. Free.

QNA: A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION ON THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW

http://facebook.com/event.php?eid=120307598051270

  

As part of the New York Public Library’s centenary celebration weekend, the Believermagazine will host “QNA: A Roundtable Discussion on the Art of the Interview,” featuring:

  • DICK CAVETT, legendary host of The Dick Cavett Show, which aired on ABC from 1968 to 1975 and on public television from 1977 to 1982, and author, most recently, of Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets.
  • CLAUDIA DREIFUS, interviewer for the “Conversation with…” column in the Tuesday science section of the New York Times, former Playboy interviewer, and author of two books of interviews. She’s known for her unusual Q-and-A’s with heads of state, Nobel Prize winners, and quirky engineers. She was called by Dan Rather “one of the world’s great interviewers.” Her latest publication, with Andrew Hacker, is Higher Education?   
  • KENNETH GOLDSMITH, editor of I’ll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews, and author of the underground classic Soliloquy, an unedited, 487-page transcript of every word, um, and yeah that came from his mouth during one week of his life.
  • LORIN STEIN, new editor of The Paris Review, the beloved source for some of the most in-depth interviews with writers published in the English language since the 1950s, collected in editions such as Writers At Work and The Paris Review Interviews series, he’s also the translator of Gregoire Bouillier’s The Mystery Guest.

There will be a short reading of a self-interview by the author and Saturday Night Live writer SIMON RICH, to be performed by actor PAULO COSTANZO, (of Royal Pains) followed by a presentation of playwright Darren O’Donnell’s relational theater piece, Q+A, in which the audience becomes both the interviewer and interviewee.

The event will be hosted by Believer interviews editors Sheila Heti and Ross Simonini.

This event is free but reservations are recommended. To reserve your spot via ShowClix, visit http://www.showclix.com/event/33344 or call 1.888.71.TICKETS.

More info: http://tinyurl.com/blvr-nypl-qna

UNDER DESTRUCTION II: Jimmie Durham, Martin Kersels, Michael Landy, Liz Larner, Christian Marclay, Ariel Orozco, Arcangelo Sassolino, Roman Signer, and Johannes Vogl @ Swiss Institute.

 

May 18 – June 19 2011

Part two is more oriented toward cyclical issues of consumption and spectacle. It can be seen as the crescendo of the exhibition. Here, destruction assumes the more aggressive and dramatic character one might normally associate with it.

Among the works that more directly engage the question of consumption can be found Johannes Vogl’s absurd, homemade contraption Untitled (Machine To Produce Jam Breads, 2007) which produces pieces of bread with jam on them and thus addresses questions of overproduction and consequently waste. (READ MORE.)

Andrew Schoultz: Unrest
May 19 – July 1, 2011
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Morgan Lehman Gallery is pleased to present, UNREST, a solo exhibition of new works by Andrew Schoultz. This is the artist’s third show with Morgan Lehman Gallery.

Andrew Schoultz’s UNREST stems from the artist’s continuing interest in issues of global turmoil and societal angst. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, The Japanese Earthquakes and the BP oil spill all fuel this new body of work. Rather than depict literal narratives of these events, Schoultz captures their essence using an ever-expanding arsenal of pictorial symbols. Billowing clouds of smoke create an “all-over” surface reminiscent of abstract expressionism and Op-art. These stylized clouds both unify the composition and veil the reality of the horrors depicted in the background. The obscuring impact that these clouds has on the images they hide may indicate the frustration Schoultz has with the partisan and misleading journalism the press has in disseminating information to the public. Other oft-repeated symbols include crumbling and exploding brick structures and monuments, the rearing horse, the all-seeing Masonic eye, and a lit candle set against green, yellow and red camouflaged backgrounds. The lit candle – a universal sign of hope and optimism-suggests that even in uncertain times the human spirit is nothing if not optimistic. These recurring symbols function as visual cues for a loose narrative the artist has constructed through previous bodies of work. Out of this narrative, Schoultz forms an historical construct that melds contemporary calamitous events with the broad sweep of Western civilization. (READ MORE.)

Nicholas Kashian
DEAN PROJECT

May 19 – June 25
solo-exhibition
MAP

I am essentially driven by libidinal and anti-normative desires, coupled with sensitive and concerted attention to materials and to the mechanisms of visual perception. The objects I create both resonate with heroic and cynical strains of object making and seek to undermine these very strains with humility and sincerity.

Each work or series of works is created as a compulsive reaction to the burn of being alive and the spilling over of emotions that accompany the dogged difficulty of managing life. I intend to create visual signs or experiences that approximate the shocks and waves of living.



David Levinthal: Black Again
May 19th to July 2nd

John McWhinnie at Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is pleased to announce our next exhibition, David Levinthal: Black Again. The show opens with a reception on May 19th, from 6-8pm, and runs through July 2nd, 2011. The exhibition is drawn from David Levinthal’s project Blackface, dating from 1995-1998, featuring blackface Polaroids and the original memorabilia, drawn from the artist’s personal collection, that are the Polaroid’s subject matter.

Levinthal’s collecting of black memorabilia evolved into Blackface, a stimulating and controversial body of work. The title, according to Levinthal, “makes reference to the many facades, poise and physicality of these figures.” The title is also taken from the name of a journal of a black film-making company and is a term referring to both blacks and whites. Traditionally associated with minstrelsy, these images were used to perpetuate negative stereotypes. Levinthal’s work was originally intended to be exhibited at Philadelphia’s ICA in 1997. However, the show was cancelled when it became a cause célèbre as a result of its controversial subject-matter. Subsequently, images from the series were exhibited at the International Center of Photography and at Janet Borden, Inc. in New York. This is the first time that the artist has exhibited this body of work with the original figurines and advertising that inspired the portraits. (READ MORE.)

Destroy All Monsters
Sunday, May 22, 2011
12:00 PM to 4:00 PMVideo screening in the first-floor Main Gallery and  3pm book signingwith Cary Loren.In conjunction with the new publication, Destroy All Monsters Magazine 1976-1979, published by Primary Information, MoMA PS1 and D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers present a day-long screening of Shake a Lizard Tail, or Rust Belt Rump, a film created by the band for their 1996 Japanese tour. The film is a collage of horror exploitation videos, Detroit “Dance City” techno dancers, and late night WGPR television commercials of the 1980s. The commercials feature local Detroit landmarks such as Miley and Miley’s Shrimp Shack, the Club Watts Mozambique ladies club, and various funeral homes.

In 1973, the Detroit band Destroy All Monsters was a wild and reckless synthesis of psychedelia, proto-punk, heavy metal, noise and performance art. The collective hailed from Ann Arbor, Michigan, and consisted of Cary Loren, Mike Kelley, Niagara and Jim Shaw (with later members including Ron Asheton of the Stooges, Michael Davis of the MC5 and the Miller brothers of Mission of Burma). (READ MORE.)




Gamelan Dharma Swara w/ Momenta Quartet and Shahzad Ismaily
Sun., May 22, 2011 / 7:00 PM
Gamelan Dharma Swara
 is dedicated to the study, performance and creation of traditional and new works for Balinese gamelan. Through performance and education, we bring Balinese gamelan to the widest audience and participant base possible, and we endeavor to perform with spirit, dedication and gratitude. We are a coalition of master Balinese artists and leading American composers, musicians and dancers. In residence at the Indonesian Consulate in New York, Dharma Swara regularly performs for a wide and multicultural audience in the greater New York City area. We have collaborated with Indonesiaʼs leading artists and have performed in the areaʼs top venues including: Lincoln Center, Asia Society, Japan Society, New York Philharmonic, the Met, Brooklyn Museum, Symphony Space, LaMama, and Columbia, Princeton, NYU and Yale universities. In 2010 the ensemble was invited to perform as the first non-Balinese group in the annual gong kebyar competitions at the Bali Arts Festival. (READ MORE.)
Click here to see an article on Gamelan Dharma Swara from the NYTimes

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A green art workshop with artist and Hollow Earth Society co-founder Ethan Gould
Date: Sunday, May 22
Time: 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Admission: $15
Presented by the Hollow Earth Society
Part one of a four-part series

Post-apocalyptic arts & crafts survival skills workshops, you say!?  That’s right:  Creative-making for the improvisational, post-industrial future (and present).  When the apocalypse comes, these definitely won’t be the first things you’ll need to know… but they’ll be on the list! In this workshop series, learn how to make beautiful objects you’ll actually use out of materials that would otherwise go to waste. (READ MORE.)

MORE:

3rd Ward’s Annual Birthday BBQ!
SUCKLING PIGS and OLD FASHIONEDS W/EGG AND DART CLUB

with two suckling pigs and assorted accoutrements by Sam Sherman and John Dawson (applewood, Blue Smoke) and variations on the Old Fashioned cocktail paired by Justin Lane Briggs (applewood, barbes, James, Marie Belle) plus a bit of live music from Quince Marcum and local beers for cheap! from 4pm – 10pm just $10 a head. (15 Vanderbilt Ave, Brooklyn)
SPECIAL FUNDRAISER FOR CRITICAL RESISTANCE AND THE BRECHT FORUM
Some 40 years after uprisings at Attica and her own arrest, Angela Davis comes to Riverside Church in Harlem to build bridges around issues of austerity, prisons and global resistance. She will be joined in conversation by leading intellectual activists Ruthie Gilmore and Vijay Prashad. (READ MORE.)
A Conference of Works: MODE, METHOD, MEDIUM @ UNIVERSITY OF THE STREETS
GIGANTIC MAGAZINE INDOORS LAUNCH PARTY AT 285 KENT
Rally to Save Our Seaport
The ships, collection and galleries of the Seaport Museum New York are a valuable and irreplaceable part of our proud maritime heritage as well as a unique educational opportunity for New York City’s youth. They are at now serious risk of being lost, dispersed or destroyed. The museum galleries have been closed since March. The 2011 seasons of the museum’s working vessels have been cancelled. We need your help to ensure these historic resources are protected and continue to be available to the public in New York City. (READ MORE.)




An Interview with Deborah Simon.

Deborah in the studio with her sculptures. ©2011 The 22 Magazine

This past Friday, I paid a visit to Deborah Simon who has an upcoming show at NY Studio Gallery‘s LZ Project Space opening this Friday, May 20th. Deborah has been a painter and sculptor for several years now and will be part of the Sculpture Space residency  in Utica, this coming October and November. She has worked at the Bronx Zoo building habitats and “intellectual toys” for the animals, and her work reflects the understanding of the dual nature of man-made versus natural environments and the drawbacks and necessity of both. Her sculpture’s present a strange encounter and cause the viewer to approach the animal in an unusual and raw manner, suggesting a reevaluation of the nature of human and animal interaction.

We truly appreciate her taking the time to talk about her work and upcoming show.

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

The 22 Magazine: You worked at the Bronx Zoo correct? Can you tell us a little about what you did there?

Deborah Simon: Sure, I did some design work. It was everything from giving exhibits face lifts to mural work, to sometimes just flat out designing and building exhibits. [I also built] intellectual toys for the animals. With that you have to make everything look natural. So [you have to make a] tiger toy that looks [for example] like a rotten piece of wood. It was one of those oddball weird request situations, keepers would come and say we need hummingbird feeders made out of XY and Z and we’d have to figure how to make them look natural.

The 22: How did you get into that kind of work? Did you study design in school or elsewhere?

DS: No, I’ve got a fine arts background. [I studied at] San Francisco Art Institute, which prepares you for nothing but making conceptual art. I just happened to have a realistic bent to what I do, which was thoroughly discouraged but…
I started working as a muralist and then the zoo had an ad in the paper. I replied to it and got hired. It’s one of those jobs where the guy who runs the department is fantastic, and he just expects that you need a lot of on the job training. You need to be able to weld, you need to be able to fiberglass, you need to be able to do some basic carpentry. There are just so many skills that no one person is going to have them all. They do invest in teaching you quite a bit [so], I learned a lot, and it all goes back into what I do.

The 22: In regards to your artists statement, which talks a little about the animal confronting the viewer in an unrestricted environment, did working at the zoo conflict with ideas of how animals should be treated in any way?

DS: I think it’s a conflict a lot of the people who work at the zoo have, because everyone who works there more or less loves animals. We all have multiple animals, we are deeply concerned about animal welfare. Some of the holding areas are very old and not that great. Some of the animals are permanently on medications because [there is] not the best ventilation but, on the other hand, you can’t just let them go. [I believe] Finland ran into this problem. They decided it was cruel and inhumane to keep this baboon exhibit. They decided it was inhumane to keep more tropical animals in Finland, but they couldn’t get rid of them because they breed really well and every zoo has a ton of them. So, they were going to euthanize them but the public had a fit and they had to keep them. So, now they have these unhappy baboons; animals that are obviously not doing well, but there are no other options for them. [I think] a lot of the people [that work at the zoo] go through this. [They think] these animals didn’t ask for this, they didn’t want to become ambassadors of their species, but on the other hand sometimes when your standing and watching the public watch these animals and they suddenly make this connection to the human traits of the animals you really hope it does something. They are suddenly more aware of them and, you think, I hope this means that it will translate into something, maybe [that wouldn’t be there] if they hadn’t seen it. Then again, zoo animals they don’t behave like wild animals, they have three meals a day, they sleep all day. [In the end] it’s a lot of mixed emotions.

The 22: A lot of your animals actually are puppets or look a lot like traditional marionettes. Stylistically how did you decide this was how you were going to build?

DS: It’s weird because I have this totally anal goal to be as accurate as humanly possibly, but I’m always reminding myself it’s art, not taxidermy. I was living in India for a while and India is a very sculpture oriented place. I had been painting for years and years at that point, and maybe it was just being around so much sculpture. I was home in the states and one day I just thought, what would happen if I make sculpted animals with fake fur? The hyena was the first one. I found [the hyena’s fur] in the bargain bin and I thought, this looks just like spotted hyena fur, no wonder it’s on sale. I brought back Sculpy and fur and whatever else I thought I wouldn’t be able to get in India, and just started working. I was originally thinking of porcelain dolls-[with] the hard heads and the soft body. I was thinking more along the lines of what would it be like to make these things so they look like creeped out porcelain dolls, but they actually ended up a little but more like [weird] taxidermy.

Deborah working in her studio. photo ©2011 Ted Szczepanski

The 22: They seem to have this really human quality, a very aggressive straight on gaze…

DS:I feel even though animals are a really popular subject right now, it’s always animal as metaphor or animal as parable. They play the role of an odalisque and they don’t confront the viewer. They are a stand in for history, they’re a stand in for human behavior, but they are never just themselves, and when they are themselves it’s more kitschy animal art. I want it to be as if you were walking into their space. It’s kind of that feeling when you out in the woods or hiking, or even in Central Park [where] it tends to be a bird of prey, a hawk or something, and you have that instant where they look at you, and you look at them, and you have no idea what’s going to go on. Especially if it’s big enough to hurt you. Then it’s this totally different interaction than the zoo or anything else. Your walking into their space, and they are psychologically dominating it. The sculptures themselves are going to be hung so your going to have to walk around them. They force you to move around them instead of being on the walls or giving a pathway.

The 22: Can you tell me a little about Coyote Pursue’s puppet project?

DS: It was a pretty amazing experience. Collaborating was new to me but Matt Reeck is a good friend and amazing to work with. We shored up each others strengths and weaknesses really well. I would never have been able to direct something like that. I think in the future I may do more puppetry but do it so it’s video.

Coyote Pursues, 2010. photo courtesy of St. Ann's Warehouse

 The 22: Is there a difference between building the puppets versus building the sculptures? Is that something you had to learn?

DS: Yes. St. Ann’s puppet lab is a nine month program so they are a huge resource, but it took me forever just to figure how to walk them. It took me two months just to build one, to actually physically construct it so that it moved properly. Once I got the basic structure it took me weeks to figure out how to string it, and that’s one of the times the lab was great. I brought them in and said I don’t know what to do, and one of the guys [showed me], and it was done. It was wonderful.

The 22: The piece itself was about a world where humans are gone, and coyotes are the only ones left right?

DS: [Matt Reeck] is a wonderful poet and he gave me a book of his poetry and asked me to illustrate it. At the time I was just feeling like, I don’t want to paint anything, and I don’t want to sketch.
[But] I was thinking [the poetry] would be perfect to do a puppet show with, and so we said what the hell, we’ll write a puppet lab. We threw it together in two weeks, and we were really surprised we got in. Originally we had taken three of his poems, more short prose really, and the one we both had a very clear vision-that was the same vision-was [the coyote] one. We started building and time started ticking by, and we realized the other two we’re never going to make it, and that we wouldn’t have time [to perform more than one]. You only got twenty minutes tops to perform. So, we decided just to focus on the coyotes, and it was really based on his writing, and [the idea of] not using the animals as parables but to be really Darwinian about it. What would a coyote really be doing if they were wandering around in this world with nothing really left. We were thinking of it as The Road but with coyotes.

The 22: Did you do a cover for The Beastie Boys [Intergalatic]?

DS: I had actually done the paintings and they ended up on the cover. The paintings were actually in the small works show at NYU and Mike D’s wife  bought them. So, she came over to my studio and she’s chatting and we’re having this very nice conversation, and she keeps talking about her husband’s band and so I’m thinking….ok, band whatever and being polite, I ask oh what band is your husband in? And she’s says, The Beastie Boys, and at that point I’m immediately intimidated. So about six months later, they called to see if it was ok with me if they used it as an album cover and I just thought….ooook, twist my arm. It was just this little freak thing, they were just these little freak paintings, that I wasn’t planning to do as a body of work or anything.

Memento mori: Ocelot and ocelot skeleton, oil on wood, 68” w x 36” h, 2001

The 22: What about the memento mori series paintings? Can you talk a little about what this series means to you and why you decided to do it?

DS: I think in that series I’d been reading a lot about evolution. I was thinking about how death influences life. I was thinking about a Darwinian perspective, you have these animals with these constant pressures, and it’s survival of the fittest but also thinking about viewing what human’s do in the world [destruction and pollution] as unnatural, but it is natural because we are part of the world and this is part of what we do. Animals routinely destroy their environments, but they don’t do it in the same numbers that we do. Elephants constantly  trash environments and have to move on, but there are so few of them, they aren’t ruining Africa or Asia-we sort of beat them to it. I guess I was thinking about that simple pressure and interaction, and how some of your stiffest competition is from your species. You know species always have more children than your going to need. You really only need a one to one replacement and chances are that’s all your going to get if your lucky.

Kiki Smith discusses creativity at The New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute.

May 11 (Wed) 7:30 pm “Conversations with…” III:
Lois Oppenheim interviews Kiki Smith (admission fee of $25 per person)

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The New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, in celebration of the Centenary of its Society, continues its “Conversations with….” series and is pleased to present Lois Oppenheim in discussion with internationally-acclaimed artist Kiki Smith. The discussion will explore how to define creativity and what constitutes the creative process.

KEWPIE WITH STYLE: SOFA NY 2011: JAN HULING.

Jan Huling

SOFA NY 2011

Opening Night Preview:

Wednesday April 13th, 2011

5-9 PM (Invitation Only)

Where: Park Avenue Armory

Exhibition Dates: April 14-17, 2011

Show Hours:

Thursday: 11am – 7pm

Friday: 11am – 6pm

Saturday: 11am – 7pm

Sunday: Noon – 6pm

Show Location: Park Avenue at 67th St.

www.LyonsWierGallery.com

Lyons Wier Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new sculptural work by artist Jan Huling and an entrance installation by ceramicist Sin-ying Ho at SOFA NEW YORK 2011.

Neither sketched nor planned, Jan Huling‘s three-dimensional works draw inspiration from her travels to India and Mexico, as well as imagined, playful scenes reminiscent of childhood fairy tales and fantasies. Huling’s work is approachable yet evocative, incorporating spiritual iconography alongside humorous artifacts of contemporary popular culture. The armatures for Huling’s sculptures are an unpredictable mix of forms ranging from Kewpie and Munny dolls to birds and tiny life-sized insects. This exploration of shape and scale adds to the whimsical charm of her work.

In addition to seed beads, Huling’s colorful sculptures incorporate a variety of found objects, such as buttons, coins, tokens and costume jewelry. Huling’s slow and meticulous beading process, the intricacy of her swirling, hypnotic patterns, and the spontaneous manner with which Huling approaches each new project results in sculpture that is both delicate and alluring to touch – simply put, she transforms the ordinary into the extraordinary.

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This Sunday: Institute_Institut at Studio Maya

The final piece in the Transformational Grammar of the Institutional Glorybowltrilogy. Performances will be in early Fall, 2011.

NOW SEEKING OPINIONS, EXPERIENCES, AND FEEDBACK

Please join us for a Focus Workshop in March, 2011. NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED, ALL INDIVIDUALS OF ALL AGES, FROM ALL BACKGROUNDS INVITED

Sunday, March 13th, 2-5pm at Surreal Estate (15 Thames St., Brooklyn)
Sunday, March 20th, 2-5pm at Studio Maya (603 Bergen St., Brooklyn)
Sunday, March 27th, 2-5pm at Force and Flow (1102 Dean St. #4, Brooklyn)
(RSVP for addresses to: panoplylab@gmail.com)

FREE

Between Dec. 2010 and June 2011, PPL is conducting a series of Focus Workshops in Brooklyn, NY, investigating cultural structures, interpersonal politics, daily conceptions of reality, and institutional ecologies.

Seeking opinions, experiences, and feedback from individuals of all ages and from all backgrounds, these workshops form a public co-creation aspect of the experimental opera project Institute_Institut.

A Focus Workshop is part focus group and part thinktank. “Workshop” is used to note the performance-based perspective held by the workshop facilitators (the artists creating the project) and the performance research direction that some workshops take, depending on the interests of the participants.

Part I: Group Discussion. What are institutions? How do they function in your life? What are some of your experiences with them?

Part 2: Enactions, observations, and games.

All participants will receive a free ticket to the performances ofInstitute_Institut, in Fall 2011. The project is a staged documentary opera about authority, reality, institutionality, and sensibility. Issues and ideas discussed and researched through these Focus Workshops, as well as selected experiences, statements, and documentation from them (and many other forms of research) will largely form the libretto.

For more information, email panoplylab@gmail.com.

CONVOCATORIA: Participa con tus opiniones, experiencias y reacciones.

Se parte de nuestro Grupo de Enfoque. Experiencia no necesaria. Personas de cualquier edad y nacionalidad pueden participar.

Domingo, 13 de Marzo, 2-5pm en Surreal Estate (15 Thames St., Brooklyn)
Domingo, 20 de Marzo, 2-5pm en Studio Maya (603 Bergen St., Brooklyn)
Domingo, 27 de Marzo, 2-5pm en Force and Flow (1102 Dean St. #4, Brooklyn)
(Reservaciones: panoplylab@gmail.com)

GRATIS

Desde el mes de diciembre 2010 a junio 2011, PPL ha estado realizando una serie de talleres informativos en Brooklyn, Manhattan y Queens. Los talleres investigan las estructuras culturales, las políticas mediativas, las construcciones diarias de la realidad, y las ecologías institucionales.

Se hace un llamado a personas de todas las edades y nacionalidades que quieran participar y contribuir con sus opiniones, experiencias e ideas en los talleres creativo-informativos. Los resultados serán incluidos como parte de colaboración en el proyecto Institute_Institut.

El Grupo de Enfoque funcionara también como fuente de inspiración y creación. En este sentido, “Taller” se refiere al aspecto performativo realizado por los artistas que facilitan la creación del proyecto y dirigen la investigación del mismo en base a los intereses de cada participante.

PRIMERA PARTE: Discusión en grupo. – ¿Qué son las instituciones? – ¿Cómo funcionan? – ¿Cómo han sido tus experiencias con ellas?

SEGUNDA PARTE: Interpretaciones, observaciones y juegos.

Participantes recibirán una entrada gratis para la presentación deInstitute_Institut, en Otoño 2011. El proyecto se presentara como un documental montado al estilo de una ópera que tratará temas de autoridad, realidad, institucionalidad y sensibilidad. Las ideas y conceptos que fueron discutidos e investigados durante los talleres de enfoque de grupo, así como las experiencias, declaraciones y documentación de los participantes, serán incluidos como parte del libreto.

Para información: panoplylab@gmail.com.