THE WEEK/WEEKEND: Dec 13th-?????!!!

Just a reminder, The 22 will be on vacation from Dec 19th-29th. Weekly listings will return around Jan 1st, and submissions are due for the collage volume by Jan 30th, (though we highly recommend getting them in during these 2 weeks.) Have a safe and Happy Holipocalypse!

The Bark and Scream Series: Eli Keszler: Percussion and Ashley Paul: Alto Sax
THE FIREHOUSE SPACE
December 13, 2012 8:00 pm

Where (we) Live
BAM
Paula Greif, ceramics (Dec 19)
Marsha Trattner, blacksmith (Dec 20)
Riccardo Vecchio, painter (Dec 21)
Victoria Valencia, woodworker/furniture-maker (Dec 22)

Masters at crafting alluring sonic landscapes from the most unlikely found objects, Brooklyn-based quartet Sō Percussion explores the idea of home with a bold experiment in collaborative art-making. Directed by three-time Obie Award winner Ain Gordon (Spalding Gray: Stories Left to Tell), Where (we) Live invites artistic colleagues working in different mediums to participate as both co-collaborator and muse in Sō’s creative process and performance: Grey Mcmurray (itsnotyouitsme, Knights on Earth) writes poignant, personal songs; Martin Schmidt’s videos show the quirky and unnoticed beauty in our homes; and Emily Johnson delivers secret instructions to the performers onstage. Each evening will also feature a special guest artist (listed below). To these and other contributions, Sō adds an astounding range of composed and improvised sounds, inspired by the physical and symbolic places we live.

JOHN HODGMAN: THAT IS ALL
Friday, Dec 21, 2012
The Bell House

Not even John Hodgman, the Daily Show’s resident expert, knows for sure. But he is keeping John Cusack prisoner in his home, just in case. And on December 21, he will perform what is likely to be the last night of comedy entertainment ever.

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Letha Wilson

Higher Pictures
Thursday, December 13, 6 – 8 pm

Higher Pictures presents the first solo exhibition by Letha Wilson. Wilson uses photography as a material medium combining photographic images of nature, prints, paint, concrete and wood in a dimensional manner to examine the made world.My artwork uses images I have photographed in the natural landscape as a starting point for interpretation and confrontation. The work creates relationships between architecture and nature, the gallery space and the American wilderness. In the photo-based sculptures the ability for a photograph to transport the viewer is both called upon, and questioned; sculptural intervention attempts to compensate for the photographʼs failure to encompass the physical site it represents. Landscape photography as a genre is approached with equal parts reverence and skepticism.

 

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THE WEEK: APRIL 16-20.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Cross-Reference: A Collaborative Exhibition Featuring the work of Hans + Gieves
http://www.likethespice.com/Cross-Reference-Hans+Gieves.html
04/20/2012-05/27/2012

Like the Spice gallery presents Cross-Reference, a collaborative of Nashville-based painter Hans Schmitt-Matzen and Brooklyn-based photographer Gieves Anderson. It’s fitting that Hans and Gieves begin the works in their latest series in libraries, which the two artists consider sanctuaries of thought. Duly titled Cross-Reference, the series enables a philosophical contemplation of color and composition through an alchemy of the disparate mediums of photography and painting. Libraries’ unbroken rows and columns of books were the artists’ inspiration for the new works, and Gieves’ large photographic prints of the buildings’ interiors and exteriors form the multicolored surfaces to which Hans applies oils in thick gestural strokes made with brushes, blades, and customized squeegees.

Marc Brotherton – New Work
http://www.causeycontemporary.com/node/marc-brotherton/6235?tpl=tpls/exhibitionpressrelease&location=6235
04/20/2012-05/27/2012

Causey Contemporary is pleased to present two solo exhibitions this April, New Paintings by Marc Brotherton and Acid Bath by Nina Carelli. Marking his third solo exhibition with the gallery, Brotherton will present his newest series of bold, mixed-media paintings, which explore ideas of new technology, communication, color and design. Marc Brotherton contends that living in the twenty-first century, we are constantly bombarded by input– be it from televisions, news sources, the internet, or one of the many communication gadgets. In a way, Brotherton’s paintings are a form of communication, which address technological and political quandaries, but also banalities of daily life. The outcome of his work is a materialized investigation into the perplexing world in which we live. Brotherton states that his incentive to make art comes from an “…inner curiosity, a personal necessity to acknowledge an awareness that we are here together inhabiting an increasingly chaotic world.”

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THE WEEK/WEEKEND: FEB 24-26.

EDITOR’S PICKS:

Bruce Brosnan: See, hear, remember/Tyler Vlahovich: recent work
http://www.featureinc.com/
02/15/2012-03/18/2012
12pm-6pm

Bruce Brosnan began exhibiting with Feature Inc. in 2000 and See, hear, remember is his fourth one-person exhibition witht he gallery. He lives and works in Brooklyn, has a BFA from Maine College of Art (19915) and an MFA from Hunter College (1998), which is where I first saw his inspired installations. Tyler Vlahovich has a BFA (1989) from California Institute of the Arts and lives and works in Los Angeles. This recent work is his third one-person exhibition with the gallery and coincidentally, we also began working together in 2000.

BOTANICA
http://thisisbotanica.com/
02/22/2012-02/25/2012
8pm-9:30pm

BOTANICA is a creepy futuristic black comedy that examines our complicated relationship to plant life. Sealed in a human terrarium, two unorthodox botanists and a caretaker with a penchant for erotic literature unleash a flood of unusual findings and overturn the constraints of science and social norms. Riotously lush” and “a perverse kick.” -New York Times “Sex, drugs, and
botany? Plants will never seem the same after Jim Findlay’s BOTANICA, an original, mesmerizing, and disturbing piece of experimental insanity.” –Flavorpill “If you’ve had your fill of tame/lame Broadway shows, are a fan of Sci-Fi, and happen to have dendrophilia, this show is perfect for you.” –Papermag “If you’re into what’s probably the most expertly sculpted piece of weirdness in town, then I assure you, BOTANICA’s got the goods.” –NYtheatre.com

Opening Party
facebook.com/uncannnyvalleynyc
02/24/2012-02/25/2012
7:30 pm -1:00 am

UNCANNY VALLEY OPENING PARTY February 24, 7:30 p- 1:00a// $10 …In which we open up the floodgates. Join us to celebrate the official opening of Uncanny Valley as a public venue! This is a fundraiser for the space, to ensure that we are warm and well-lit in throughout the winter! Uncanny Valley, our new performance and art project space, will open with a party to benefit and celebrate the space. The party will feature performances from partners and residents, including a glimpse of “The Golden Veil”, the new show from The National Theater of the United States of America, new songs from Balkan no-wave band The Drunkard’s Wife, a play from Williamsburg’s Dome Theater, Lisa Ludwig’s Art Neighborhood installation, and much more! The event takes place at 26-09 Jackson Avenue (at 44th road, near the Court Square station) from 7:30 pm to 1:00 am on Friday, February 24, 2012. HERE IS A MAP: http://g.co/maps/k5p84

The Weekend:Dec 2-4.

FRIDAY:

TED BROOKLYN:
We’re living in what is commonly referred to as the “Information Age.” With the emergence of social networks, we build new communities by pressing the “Like” and “+1” buttons and becoming fans. As we become increasingly interconnected with the Brooklyn community in these new ways, we find ourselves grasping for a new common ethos. In other words, we are striving to refine and define “better.” On December 2 at Brooklyn Bowl, we will address these issues with talks from the best and brightest minds of Brooklyn and beyond.

OPERA ON TAP/Roulette Sisters.
Opera is fun. Most people don’t seem to realize how much fun it really is. In order to prove it, Opera on Tap has taken its act to barrooms where they found out that beer on tap enhances the operatic experience. The company is made up of young singers and instrumentalists who relish the direct contact with audiences not inhibited in their reactions by the looming menace of giant chandelier.The Roulette Sisters have been turning heads and stopping traffic since forming in the cold winter of 2003. Noticing that their warm velvet harmonies and spicy hot licks were melting the snow outside, the sisters realized that they had started something not only weather-altering but soul-stirring as well. The sexy sisters play a hip-shaking blend of American country blues, traditional songs, popular tunes and old timey music from the first half of the 20th century. With Mamie Minch: resonator guitar, Meg Reichardt: electric guitar, Megan Burleyson: washboard, Karen Waltuch: viola.

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THE WEEKEND: SEPT 23-25.

KRONOS QUARTET: Awakening: A Musical Meditation on the Anniversary of 9/11

Part of the 2011 Next Wave Festival
Sep 21—24, 2011 at 7:30pm 

Pioneering contemporary music ensemble Kronos Quartet (More Than Four, 2007 Next Wave) returns to BAM with a heartfelt program comprising 12 compositions—including works by Michael Gordon, Terry Riley, Osvaldo Golijov and Gustavo Santaolalla, and John Oswald—plus gripping arrangements of traditional songs from around the globe. This stirring collection of works reflects upon those instances where traditional language fails us, and music steps in to restore what violinist David Harrington refers to as “equilibrium in the midst of imbalance.”

Read the full program here.

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THE WEEK: AUGUST 15-19.

PROJECT FUKUSHIMA! BENEFIT CONCERTS @ THE STONE.
8/15 Monday  8 and 10pm

PROJECT FUKUSHIMA! BENEFIT CONCERTS
John Zorn, Ned Rothenberg (sax) Uri Caine, Shoko Nagai, Karl Berger (piano) Ikue Mori (electronics) Ha Yang Kim (cello) Nels Cline, David Watson (guitar) Yuka Honda (keyboards) Satoshi Takeishi (drums) Shayna Dunkelman (percussion) Chuck Bettis, Michael Carter (electronics) Kato Hideki (bass) and many special guests!
TWO SPECIAL SETS OF IMPROVISED MUSIC AS PART OF A WORLD-WIDE INITIATIVE FOR THE LAND AND PEOPLE OF FUKUSHIMA. ALL PROCEEDS WILL GO TO PROJECT FUKUSHIMA!—TWENTY DOLLARS

THIS NIGHT WILL BE BROADCAST LIVE OVER WEBSYN RADIO BY DOMINIQUE BALAY—THE LINK http://droitdecites.org/2011/06/08/websynradio-en-direct-de-the-stone-new-york-fukushima/

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The New York International Fringe Festival
Friday, Saturday and SundayFringeNYC? The New York International Fringe Festival (FringeNYC) is the largest multi-arts festival in North America, with more than 200 companies from all over the world performing for 16 days in more than 20 venues. In addition to 1200 incredible performances, FringeNYC includes…..(READ MORE.)


Maya Zack: Living Room

The Jewish Museum
July 31, 2011 – October 30, 2011

In the installation, Living Room, artist and filmmaker Maya Zack uses large-scale computer-generated 3D images accompanied by sound to evoke a Jewish family’s apartment from 1930s Berlin. While listening to the stories and memories of Manfred Nomburg, visitors can experience the apartment visually. 3D glasses enhance the oversized images reimagining rooms in the apartment and give them immediacy and depth.

Everybody Loves the Monster!
Thursday, August 18, 2011, 10 a.m.

In 1818, when Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus was published for the first time, Mary Shelley could not have imagined the monster she was unleashing on the world. The creature in Shelley’s novel is remarkably sympathetic and an eloquent speaker, capable of measured, intelligent, and articulate argument.  But based on Boris Karloff’s 1931 film performance and confirmed by countless other films, comics, and illustrations, the general perception today is that Frankenstein’s creature is a “monster” who grunts or speaks—if he talks at all—in disjointed monosyllables.

Why has popular culture largely denied the creature his reasonable voice? This symposium brings together four scholars and the curator and bibliographer of The New York Public Library’s Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection to reflect on graphic and film representations of the “monster” from the past two centuries. The first half of the day will feature presentations on key visual adaptations of the creature, while the latter half will engage questions about what these appearances mean for understanding him as a political and historical subject.

Yana Dimitrova and Angela Washko: Cheap Paradise of Familiar Tasks and Places
Opening reception: August 19th, 6:30 pm on
Flux Factory 

Consider escaping your common, everyday tasks and places without using your common, everyday devices. Through installation, painting, drawing, and video, Yana Dimitrova and Angela Washko portray the mundane patterns and structures of everyday experience and consider models of living that exist outside of our “to-buy-is-to-gratify” mentality. Stripping fast food architecture and smart phone technology of it’s branding and context, Washko and Dimitrova present what remains – hollow monuments to consumer culture.

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POST PLASTIC PROJECT AT LITTLEFIELD.


In the middle of the Pacific Ocean, thousands of miles away from land, and humans, there is enormous floating reminder of the indelible mark we leave from afar. Called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the Plastic Vortex and the world’s largest landfill, the North Pacific Gyre is a combination of currents and carelessness that makes up what some suggest is a wasteland filled with plastic. Rife with fantastic sounding aquatic traps such as “ghost nets,” it is suggested that its collection is of such a scale that, as of yet, no one has been able to calculate its true size.

In a song by local Park Slope musicians Whale Belly, there is an interesting lyric  “I know what I hate, I just don’t know why.”

The upcoming show Whale Belly is slated to perform in, Post Plastic Project at Littlefield in Brooklyn, plans to remedy just such ignorance through a feast of artists, musicians and comedians curated to raise money, and awareness for the environmental organization, Project Kaisei.

Discovered by chance in 1997 by oceanographer Charles Moore, the North Pacific Gyre is Project Kaisei’s main focus. Kaisei itself began in late 2008 when co-founders, Doug Woodring, George Orbelian, and Mary T. Crowley, found a need to bring attention and research to the growing problem of plastic pollution. In 2009 Kaisei launched its brigantine vessel (the namesake of Kaisei, meaning “Ocean Planet”) and an oceanography vessel called “New Horizon,” donated from partnering organization Scripps Institute of Oceanography. The mission was to collect and calculate data on the amount, type, and breakdown rates of plastic litter that is trapped in the middle of the ocean.

Some findings maintain that certain types of plastic are breaking down at rates much faster than imagined. Most recently the rate was a year or less for some materials to completely disintegrate and penetrate waters and wildlife, raising concerns about toxin levels in fish and other saltwater animals. Utilizing a variety of technological outlets to get their message across, Team Kaisei reports directly from the boat with updates on their findings, and even has a voyage tracker via Google Earth that allows you pinpoint the location, and view interactive message from crew members.

When I asked Lindsay Bourget, one of the curators of the Post Plastic Project, “Why Kaisei?” she answered directly, “I started this project because I wanted to find someone to donate to that made the most sense and they [Project Kaisei] made the most sense to me, because their number one goal is to capture the plastic vortex and that’s exactly what I was most concerned about, so it seemed like a natural fit.” Some debate remains about the severity and size of the  litter in the North Pacific Gyre, along with concerns about disturbing wildlife in the effort to collect, as well as the idea that full collection of all the plastic is a Sisyphean task. Nevertheless when I asked Lindsay about her concern for the validity of such projects in the face these doubts as well as major global disasters (particularly oil spills) she acknowledged “it can be really discouraging, but then you think there’s only one way to really start making a change.”

Co-curator Laina Karavani adds, “Sometimes artists and musicians are the only one’s that people really listen to and can help illicit change, and that’s what this is all about, moving towards that change.”

Post Plastic Project will demonstrate by example, using soy ink, and semi-recycled paper in their printing materials through Long Island City based, ColorCoded, and party materials (cups, plates, etc) provided by SustyParty, a New York based company that provides a line of eco-friendly, biodegradable party products made from corn oil, tapioca starch and other recycled materials, along with a bin to collect and ensure compost.

The artists and musicians are pooled from both Lindsay and Laina’s art and design background. Lindsay currently works in packing and architectural design, and went to Colorado Institute of Art, while Laina is photographer originally from New Jersey. Laina moved to San Francisco to attend the Art Academy of San Francisco, and found herself in an environment of high sustainability expectations. Drawing from this experience and from a childhood where recycling was the norm, Laina and Lindsay were eventually introduced by a professor who thought they might be a good match (their birthdays are only two days apart.) As the project grew larger both realized that this kind of grassroots organization for a less dire cause might be exactly what people were looking for.

The show is a powerhouse in itself with fifteen artists, four bands, and two MC’s. Mostly local fare, the artists were friends of or approached directly by Lindsay and Laina, and much to their surprise, nearly all said yes. With the increase of sustainable forms of living becoming the norm in Brooklyn it was easy to see that Lindsay and Laina’s project provided the perfect outlet for supporters looking for a more manageable idea of altruism.

The line up for music is strong and ranges from the pipes of a classically trained opera singer (singing in a rock band of course) Little Grey Girlfriend, the upbeat and introspective words and sound of Whale Belly (Park Slope), The Robin Electric with nostalgic twinges of their Cleveland roots, and string band turned electric from Chicago, Panoramic and True.

Artists include talent like artist and curator Ben Peterson, Christine Nguyen, illustrator Mariana Silva, award-winning motion graphics designer Mauricio Leon, illustrator Travis Simon, Daria Tessler and many more.

There will be prints for sale, a raffle, giveaways and comedic relief with the help of couple MC’s Brooke Van Poppelen and Luca Molandes.

The show takes place this Sunday June 5th at Littlefield in Brooklyn
Doors open at 6, with a free art reception and $10 cover for the music.
All proceeds will benefit the effort of Project Kaisei.

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