THE BASEMENT RECORDINGS BY SHAYNA DULBERGER.

The 22 Magazine: How long having you been playing in Brooklyn?

Shayna Dulberger: I have been playing in Brooklyn since 2004. My first couple of gigs were at the Lucky Cat in Williamsburg. That club is not around anymore. I attended Manhattan School of Music’s Preparatory Division from age 16 to 18. I doubled in the Classical and Jazz program. I graduated from Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in 2005 with a degree in music. I studied to be a Jazz Musician.

22: What inspired the Basement recordings?

SD: I decided I needed to work on a conceptual project that would produce a lot of recordings. I was checking out the performance artist Tehching Hsieh. I was interested in his processes and focus on duration and repetition. For this project I was also influenced by the rhythmic elasticity and percussion of Southeast Asia, The Thai Elephant Orchestra for their sense of space and rhythm, and Throbbing Gristle for their experimentation with reverb and delay. I was also thinking a lot about the upright bass and how it doesn’t sound well on ear buds. I wanted to make recordings where the bass sounded like an upright bass but also had enough treble to cut through headphones on the subway. I made short pieces that would sound good on shuffle with a massive music library. After working a lot of odd jobs I thought a lot about ipod shuffles and meditation. I live pretty far south in Brooklyn.

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Henry Gwiazda: Claudia and Paul

claudia and paul 2:13 a.m. text version
by Henry Gwiazda

It’s late, and I’m looking out of my window onto the street below. Not because I’m bored, or some sound or movement has aroused me, but because I do.

I’m looking at a crossroads in an older part of the city from a height of about 5 stories. The buildings are only two or three stories and there are numerous streetlights. There is a man standing almost in the middle of the crossroads facing in my direction looking down the road to his left. There is a woman standing in the road as well, just a few feet from the corner of the lower right side of the crossroads. She is looking in the opposite direction than the man is looking. On the sidewalk, up the street that runs up and down, is a dog, a Great Dane, which is looking further up the street.

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Help support DAMP PATCHES with April Gertler.

HELP SUPPORT CONTRIBUTOR APRIL GERTLER’S BOOK PROJECT: DAMP PATCHES.
I’ve had the very great pleasure of seeing some of these pieces in person and each one of them is so uniquely lovely. April will talk about this and other projects in the forthcoming video interview for the 22 but in the meantime help her make it happen!

Donations range from $25 to $750 (which includes a personal hand-made collage from April.)

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

In October 2010 I was invited to Paris for an artist residency at l’entreprise culturelle. Out of that residency came DAMP PATCHES – which is a new collection of work I developed into an artist book that mixes my collage work with photography and drawing. The title of the book comes from the loose translation of a deodorant ad from the French fashion magazine Votre Beaute (1973): Prisonnière des taches d’humidité sous les bras. – A prisoner of damp patches.

I like working with collage because I enjoy using original source materials such as found photographs, fashion magazine ads, and bits and pieces that I find on the street or in the trash, and the hands-on experience of working with paper, glue, scissors and thread. It feels increasingly relevant to use a hands-on approach as many other parts of my life are being swallowed by the digital world.

I use collage as my primary medium because I feel it is the best way for me to combine images and explore various concepts that interest me the most, such as; the complex dynamics of intimate relationships, female empowerment, and the anonymity of urban life. I am dedicated to my original source materials which tend to restrict the final size of my work, but in that way they become more precious and intimate for the viewer, DAMP PATCHES has challenged my continuing understanding of what collage can become.

The idea of creating a book surrounding the project came together when I was speaking to my colleague and friend, Eduardo Serafim about DAMP PATCHES. Eduardo co-founded AML-Press in February 2011, and suggested that AML print the book with their newly acquired Risograph printer; a machine part Xerox copier, part offset press which has the quality of a silkscreen.

The Risograph machine was not initially intended for artist books or printed projects but rather for high volume commercial use. I loved the idea of using the Riso because the quality and texture of the images produced by the machine highly compliment the source material I use in my work which typically comes from the 1960’s – 1980’s.

The final book will marry the low-tech feel of the collage work with the high tech printing method of the Riso. As a result the collages and photographs will be the same size and the same texture as the original works. I am really enthusiastic about this part of the project because it helps me push my practice further by exploring my interest in all 3 mediums and takes them to a new level.

The funding I’m requesting would support the production of the book by supplementing the printing costs, paper, assembly, and shipping/distribution of the finished book.

The book would be:

  • 36 pages
  • Book size (closed) 8.5″ x 11.5″
  • Printed on the Risograph
  • Staple binding
  • Edition of 300

I hope you are interested in sharing in my enthusiasm. Thank you for your time, attention and support.

My best,

April Gertler

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Kopenhagenerstrasse 4

10437 Berlin, Germany

a@aprilgertler.com

www.aprilgertler.com

Project location: Berlin, Germany

Tonight at Dean Project.

DEAN PROJECT 511 West 25th Street – No. 207 New York, NY 10001

Till the Break of Dawn Karlos Cárcamo

Exhibition dates: April 7th – May 14th, 2011 Opening reception: Thursday April 7th from 6 to 8pm

Tel. 212.229.2017 Email. info@deanproject.com Gallery hours: Tues – Sat noon-6pm

DEAN PROJECT is pleased to present “Till the Break of Dawn”, an exhibition of new work by New York based artist Karlos Cárcamo, on view from April 7th to March 30, 2011. This is his first solo exhibition with Dean Project.

Karlos Cárcamo will present a new series of paintings, sculptures, and mixed media collages that continue his on-going exploration of urban culture, its history, and the social-dynamic impact it has on all aspects of mainstream popular culture.

Adopting a conceptual process similar to the constructed nature found in hip hop music. Cárcamo incorporates its working methodology as a tool to appropriate or “sample” from, a broad spectrum of art historical sources that include, hard-edge painting, constructivism, geometric abstraction, and neo-concrete art. Cárcamo’s unique blend of work straddle the line between form and content while also paying homage to a diverse group of people that include artists Lygia Clark, Ellsworth Kelly, and Kurt Scwhitters, musician James Brown, The Incredible Bango Band and early graffiti pioneers, Pistol 1, Stan 153, Stay High and Flint 707.

Karlos Cárcamo graduated with a BFA from the School of Visual Art in 1997 and MFA from Hunter College in 2000. His work has been included in exhibitions at the Bronx, Queens, and The Brooklyn Museum, PS 1 Center for Contemporary Art, Artists Space, Jersey City Museum, El Museo del Barrio, Longwood Art Gallery, White Box, and PS 122 Gallery. He has been awarded residencies to the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (1998), Atlantic Center for the Arts (2002) and the Lower East Printshop (2009).

For further information please contact DEAN PROJECT at 212.229.2017 or info@deanproject.com