THE WEEKEND: May 6-8.

FRIDAY MAY 6th

Umirayushchii lebed (The Dying Swan), 1917 @ THE GUGGENHEIM.

Fridays, April 22 and May 6, 13 @ 1 and 2:30 pm

Directed by Evgeni Bauer
49 minutes, 35 mm, silent with musical score

Image Courtesy Milestone Film & Video

A figure of fundamental importance in the history of silent cinema, Russian director Evgeni Bauer brings to life a chilling tale that takes a sardonic view of popular morbid obsessions in pre-Revolutionary Russia. Bauer’s film features a decadent artist obsessed with capturing the image of death on canvas, an infatuation that drives him to the brink of despair until he watches a captivating and heartbroken ballerina perform. He sees in her the masterpiece he seeks, but ultimately, the young dancer cannot live up to the artist’s ideal and suffers the disturbing consequences.


ALCHEMICALLY YOURS – A Group Art Show @ OBSERVATORY.

alchemically

Robert M. Place “Caduceus” detail 2011

Opening: Saturday, May 7th, 2011 7-10pm
On View: May 8th – June 12th, 2011
Hours: Thursdays & Fridays 3-6pm; Saturdays & Sundays 12-6pm
MAP 

Observatory and Phantasmaphile’s Pam Grossman are proud to announce ALCHEMICALLY YOURS, a group show of alchemy-themed artwork, on view from May 7th through June 12th.

Alchemy is the art of transmutation. Of taking the rough and raw, and rendering it more precious. Rather than accepting the literal “lead into gold” definition, Carl Jung believed that alchemy is a process of individuation, a symbolic and active language which guides one’s personal journey toward the realization of selfhood. An alchemist is a shape-shifter, a mystic chemist. A patient and meticulous devotee who turns the base into something resplendent.

Like dreams, alchemy speaks in pictures. At first glimpse, alchemical manuscripts from the 16th and 17th centuries look like a panoply of hallucinations. They feature images of fornicating kings and queens. Suns and moons shining in stereo. Lions and serpents and eggs, oh my. Black and white and red all over. Secret codes and effulgent iconographies teeming with meaning, yet ultimately ineffable. These pictures beget picturing. They’re signs that beg to be resignified; to be reinterpreted and refined.

The participants in ALCHEMICALLY YOURS have done just that. Varying in medium and style, each piece in this exhibition pays homage to the alchemic tradition — all the while affirming that the artist fills the role of alchemist in the present-day. For who better can elevate the mundane, turn the sub- into the sublime? From the prima materia of color and canvas comes great and vivid work.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS

Jesse Bransford
Molly Crabapple
Ted Enik
Marina Korenfeld

Adela Leibowitz
Sara Antoinette Martin
Ann McCoy
Robert M. Place
Ron Regé, Jr.
J.L. Schnabel
Hunter Stabler
Panos Tsagaris

ABOUT THE CURATOR

Pam Grossman is the creator and editor of Phantasmaphile, the premiere online destination for art aficionados with a passion for the surreal and the fantastical. An internationally beloved art and culture blog, it features daily spotlights on artists and events, as well as interviews with such visual luminaries as Thomas Woodruff, Nils Karsten, and Richard A. Kirk. Phantasmaphile was written up two years in a row on the Manhattan User’s Guide Top 400 New York Sites list, and Grossman’s previous shows, “Fata Morgana: The New Female Fantasists” and “VISION QUEST” were featured by myriad taste-making outlets including Juxtapoz, Arthur, Upper Playground, Reality Sandwich, Urban Outfitters, Creative Time, and Neil Gaiman’s Twitter page. “ALCHEMICALLY YOURS” is her latest curatorial effort, and she is proud to have it hanging at Observatory, the art and events space she co-founded.


Idée Fixe : Drawings of an Obsessive Nature @WINKLEMAN GALLERY

WINKLEMAN GALLERY
MAP
Featuring work by Man Bartlett, Astrid Bowlby, Jacob El Hanani, Dan Fischer, Shane Hope, Joan Linder, Aric Obrosey, Michael Waugh, Daniel Zeller

May 6 – June 11, 2011

Opens May 6 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Winkleman Gallery is very pleased to present Idée Fixe: Drawings of an Obsessive Nature, a group exhibition of black and white drawings by Man Bartlett, Astrid Bowlby, Jacob El Hanani, Dan Fischer, Shane Hope, Joan Linder, Aric Obrosey, Michael Waugh, and Daniel Zeller. The drawings in Idée Fixe either build toward or seem to disintegrate away from complex systems and through what is obviously a time-consuming, perhaps even obsessive process. Running the gamut from highly photo realistic representation to abstractions that suggest imagined landscapes or fields, these works are created from intense, often repetitive gestures.


Jeff Whetstone “Seducing Birds, Snakes, Men”

at Julie Saul Gallery, Chelsea. Closed Sunday/Monday. Through May 21.
Jeff Whetstone’s second exhibition with the gallery explores the nexus of language and wilderness through narrative video, 16mm film, digital animation and photography. Hunters transcend gender, men draw with snakes, and a landscape is made from sound-waves. (READ MORE.)


BROOKLYN ART SONG SOCIETY presents MASTERWORKS: THE COMPLETE SONGS OF HENRY DUPARC




The 16 songs that comprise the French master’s entire surviving output feature some of the most moving and haunting vocal music ever written. The concert features some of New York’s finest established and up-and-coming artists: pianists Michael Brofman, Michael Rose, and Miori Sugiyama; baritones Robert Osborne and Kyle Oliver; and in her Brooklyn Art Song Society debut, soprano Eleanor Taylor. Tickets are $20\$10 for students and seniors.
WHERE: Brooklyn Conservatory of Music, 58 7th Ave. Park Slope. B or Q to 7th Ave, 2 or 3 to Grand Army Plaza
WHEN: Friday May 6, 7pm
CONTACT: 917.509.6258; www.brooklynartsongsociety.org


3
rd Ward Member Group Show
May 6, 2011, 7-10pm
195 Morgan Avenue, Brooklyn NY
MAP
FREE Admission
3rd Ward Members are some of the most creative and ground-breaking people we know. Now they’re taking their work out of the media lab, shop, and photo studios, and showing the world in our biggest 3rd Ward Member Group Show ever. 

(READ MORE.)LOST WAX CASTING @3rd WARD

Lost Wax Casting is the process in which an object, preferably wax, is turned into a metal form. The process is useful for jewelry or small scale metal fabrication.  Your object can be made out of other materials such as resin, plastic, or a variety of found objects. The exact surface that is on your initial model is going to be the surface of your metal piece.
(READ MORE.)

SATURDAY MAY 7th

7th Annual Brooklyn Peace Fair
Saturday May 7, 12 noon to 5 pm:

Location: Brooklyn College Student Center
Campus Road & E. 27th Street (near Flatbush–Nostrand Junction) (See below for how to get there)

2 pm: Keynote speaker: Juan Gonzalez, Daily News Columnist & co-host “Democracy Now”

Theme: “Peace Budget?…War Budget! How War and the Military Economy Affect YOU!!”
Workshops! Tables with information and resources by community peace and justice organizations!

4:45 pm: Peace Parade to local military recruiting station, led by Rude Mechanical Orchestra

Free admission.

Sponsor: Brooklyn For Peace
Co-Sponsors: Brooklyn College Student Center and Iraq Vets Against the War
Check out the schedule
See the Program (PDF)

How to get there:
Convenient Transportation from all over Brooklyn
Subway:
2 to Flatbush Ave/ Brooklyn College (NOTE: 5 does not run to Brooklyn College on the weekend)
Bus: B6, B103, B41, Q35, B44, B11, BM2
From 2/5 train, Flatbush Avenue Station (at Nostrand Ave)

Locate Hillel Place, direction Brooklyn College; turn right at Campus Road
Campus Road curves around to the left
Student Center is on the right, at Campus Rd & 27th Street

See a map (printable, PDF)
Learn more>>


STOREFRONT EVENTS @ FESTIVAL OF IDEAS FOR THE NEW CITY

VIEW FULL FOIFTNC listings.

PAINTING URBANISM: LEARNING FROM RIO

SATURDAY MAY 7, 2011

Haas & Hahn Opening Reception: Friday, May 13th, 7pm

Storefront is pleased to present the work of Dutch artists Haas&Hahn [Dre Urhahn and Jeroen Koolhaas] in the exhibition “Painting Urbanism: Learning from Rio”. 

The exhibition will showcase paintings, documentary footage, pictures, sketches and plans of past, present and future projects developed by Haas&Hahn. Featured past projects include the Favelapaintings in Praça Cantão in Santa Marta and “Rio Cruzeiro” on the stairs of Rua Santa Helena all in Rio de Janeiro. Present projects include proposals for two New York interventions and future projects span throughout the world.  READ MORE.

 SPACEBUSTER BY RAUMLABOR
11am-7pm at the intersection of Houston Street and the Sara D. Roosevelt Park

 

Spacebuster is a mobile inflatable structure – a portable, expandable pavilion – that is designed to transform public spaces of all kinds into points for community gathering. A new iteration of a Raumlabor project, the Küchenmonument (presented in Europe in 2006-8), the Spacebuster made its first appearance in the US in New York in 2009 and has returned for the Festival of Ideas for the New City.


Martha Colburn: Dolls vs. Dictators

at the Museum of the Moving Image, Queens. $10 general/$7.50 students and seniors. Closed Monday. Through May 15.


Urban Disorientation Game
The Urban Disorientation Game is an active, participatory journey through the City that involves map-making, exploration, homing instincts, and blindfolds. (READ MORE.)

Sublime Frequencies
Sublime Frequencies, the Seattle-based record label responsible for bringing Omar Souleyman to NYC, presents two documentaries with director Robert Millis in person. (READ MORE.)


MAY FAIR AT DING DONG


A Zine, Small Press, and Music Fair

Ding Dong Lounge
929 Columbus Ave. @ 106 St.
Saturday, May 7, 2011
1pm – 7pm

A zine, small press, and music fair. For one day, join us as we transform Ding Dong Lounge into an ephemeral bookshop, crafts fair, art gallery, speakeasy, underground music venue, cookie den, and inappropriately timed Christmas Party. This is the fifth fair of its kind over the course of three years, and it gets better each time. This year includes the rare opportunity to decorate a Christmas tree with both friends and total strangers in the middle of spring.(READ MORE.)

SUNDAY MAY 8th

Black Magic(1949) – Gregory Ratoff, stars Orson Welles
LOST ORSEN WELLS @SPECTACLE. Sun, May 8: 2:30pm
124 South 3rd Street
MAP

Blackmagicposter

Sun, May 8: 2:30pm
This movie has it all: swashbuckling action, intrigue, romance, mind control, and Orson Welles!

A curious, little-seen oddity based on an Alexander Dumas tale, Black Magic adapts the story of Cagliostro (Welles) an 18th century magician and gypsy charlatan, discovered by Doctor Anton Mesmer himself, whose hypnotic powers, derived by the sheer force of his presence, involve him in a plot to overthrow the French monarchy and an opportunity to revenge himself on the aristocrat who was responsible for the execution of his parents. (READ MORE.)


MICHAEL DUDECK’S WITCH DOCTOR @ CPR TONIGHT.

Michael Dudeck Witch Doctor
WOMBTOMB



Monday, May 2
7:30 p.m.
Performance | Installation

CPR – Center for Performance Research
361 Manhattan Avenue, Unit 1
Brooklyn, NY 11211
MAP

For reservations email info@cprnyc.org

The Watermill Center is pleased to announce two events as part of The Watermill Center / CPR – Center Performance Research Partnership .  Both artists were part of the Fall 2010 / Spring 2011 Residency Program at The Watermill Center.  These events are continuations of the work they did at Watermill allowing them to present in New York City.

On Monday, May 2 at 7:30 p.m. Michael Dudeck Witch Doctor (Watermill Resident Artist October 2010) will present WOMBTOMB, the third performance / installation of his Religion Project at CPR – Center for Performance Research.  

THE WORK

WOMBTOMB

WOMBTOMB is the third performance/installation in Michael Dudeck Witch Doctor’s Religion Project, which involves the invention of a queer religion and prehistory which radically re-imagines the nature of human origins. This performance is a meditation upon the death and sex rituals of one of the factions of Dudeck’s mythology, which involves the invention of a multiplicity of genitalia and hybrid genders (and invented sexual acts to accommodate modified genders) as well as elaborate ritual sacrifice and mummification procedures. Separated into three movements, the work features a cast of five performers, including Dudeck, as well as live sound by composer/sound artist Andy Rudolph. The work is roughly 60 minutes long and contains nudity.

THE ARTISTS

Michael Dudeck Witch Doctor is a performance artist and cultural engineer whose work spans multiple media. He has performed and exhibited internationally at venues including the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s Platform Center for Photographic and Digital Art and aceartinc (Winnipeg), Pari Nadimi Gallery (Toronto), John Connelly Presents (New York), and the Watermill Center (New York).

Andy Rudolph is a Winnipeg-based sound artist and composer who works in multiple media, including musical composition for voice and instruments, digital composition, and spatial sound-works and installations. He has worked with the artists Rebecca Belmore and Noam Gonick, as well as having produced his own sound/music project The Calculus Affair and performing with the band Mahogany Frog.

Click HERE to read more about this event and to make a reservation.
Michael Dudeck Witch Doctor

The Watermill Center / CPR – Center for Performance Research Partnership

Kara Walker at Lehmann Maupin/Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

 

Lehmann Maupin Gallery in collaboration with Sikkema Jenkins & Co.,is pleased to present, Fall Frum Grace, Miss Pipi’s Blue Tale, a joint exhibition of new works by Kara Walker, on view 21 April – 4 June, 2011 at 201 Chrystie Street. At Lehmann Maupin Gallery, Walker will present three new video works, which draw on her own experience in the Mississippi Delta, “a region mythologized in song and popular culture but tragically depressing.” She explains, “I drove down to the Delta thinking about the terrors of Jim Crow and slavery, yet the silent indifference of the landscape and the economic stasis, lack of mobility, and the persistence of a racist memory in the area was what stuck.”

The exhibition at Sikkema Jenkins & Co., Dust Jackets for the Niggerati-    and    Supporting    Dissertations,    Drawings submitted ruefully by Dr. Kara E. Walker, will feature new graphite drawings and hand-printed texts on paper. This body of work grew out of the artist’s search for understanding of the way that power asserts itself in interpersonal and geopolitical spheres. As she embarked on this quest the figural elements began to disappear from her work. Now, they emerge again in what Walker describes as a “giddy embrace” of the figural and the narrative.

Continue reading

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein @ Fleisher/Ollman.

As part of the group show:

the usefulness of useless things

Michel Auder
Guy de Cointet
Janette Laverrière
Stefanie Victor
Eugene Von Bruenchenhein

Curated by Jonathan Berger
March 31 through April 30, 2011
Opening reception: Thursday, March 31, 6–8pm

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (1910-1983, lived and worked in Milwaukee)

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Untitled (VB-c-15, blue Closed Top Vessel), n.d., painted clay, 9 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches

Eugene von Bruenchenhein was born in 1910 in Marinette, Wisconsin. As an child, he relocated with his family to Milwaukee, where he lived and worked producing photographs, paintings, sculpture, and writing up until his death in 1983. In his late twenties, Von Bruenchenhein became obsessed with botany and horticulture, interests that would develop throughout his life. These interests, alongside an affinity for the mystical, were a driving influence on the ceramic vessels he created beginning around 1960.

To produce the vessels, Von Bruenchenhein mixed his own clay dug from his property and nearby construction sites. He first sculpted hundreds of tiny individual leaves, all of which were later attached to one another to form the finished piece. The structures were baked or “fired” in a coal burning stove in the parlor used to heat his home, and finally painted with whatever unwanted or discarded paints he could gather from local stores.

The identity of the vessels and their intended function remains elusive. There are credible theories that the aesthetics were informed by an awareness of Victorian ceramics and the royal ornamentation of ancient Greece. Von Bruenchenhein himself writes about the works at times as “sensor pots,” saying that they “may be used for dry flowers, or for incense burners.” However, he also states that ultimately, “There was no model for any of them…all were made for love of creation.” As objects, these vessels command a great deal of presence, a presence only amplified when considering the care, investment, and belief that Von Bruenchenhein embedded in them. Any initial associations with mundane use or decoration are challenged by their mysterious nature and the presumably profound significance they had in Von Bruenchenhein’s lexicon.

SEE MORE WORK HERE, AND MORE SCULPTURE HERE.