Support This Project: Secret City, JONATHAN NOSAN

“Unable to touch his toes at 22, Nosan moved to London for a year of physical theater and circus training, then three years as a contortion student of Mr. Lu Yi at the San Francisco Circus Centre…”

Many of us make important decisions at the age of 22, but Jonathan Nosen’s decision to become a contortionist has got to be by far one of the most interesting. Reading like a sort of theatrical fable, Jonathan (who at the time was living in a small cabin Northwest Mountains of Kyoto) switched from the study of Design of Sacred Space to acrobatics after seeing a Chinese contortionist in Nagasaki and Canadian clown in Tokyo.

It was a wise decision leading to a highly successful film and entertainment career, as well as his 2010 performemoirt piece BAGABONES and the co-creation of Acroback Productions .

photo credit Rodney Smith, New York Magazine

JONATHAN’S WEBSITE.

Help support him and The Secret City:

Have a Nice Day – Jonathan Nosan from Forward MotionTheater on Vimeo.

THE WEEKEND: July 8th-10th.

WHAT’S YER GLITCH?!? Image Node Fundraiser @HOY.

Help out New York’s premiere audio-visual techie art camp, IMAGE NODE!
Come for the badass glitchy music and stay because you are hypnotized
by the pretty blinky lights!!!
DJ Line up:
Jon Margulies, Hobotech
http://soundcloud.com/search?q%5Bfulltext%5D=hobotech
Willy Whompa, http://soundcloud.com/willywhompa
Tinseltown, http://soundcloud.com/search?q%5Bfulltext%5D=tinseltown
Ingtzi, Glitch.cz
VJ Line up:
Housewives’ Guide To Anatomy
VJ Fuzzy Bastard
Animatronic
10pm-5am, $10 before midnight, $15 after
****All proceeds got to camp Image Node in our effort to blinkie out
the playa*****
http://imagenode.org/

 

Fri 07/08 NOAH AND THE MEGAFAUNA AND BABY SODA @BARBES

NATMF: A quirky combination of indie rock songwriting with Gypsy Jazz. Think Tom Waits meets Django Reinhardt – with a full horn section, violin and vocal duets.8:00pm

BS: They play an eclectic mix influenced by New Orleans brass bands, jug music, southern gospel and hot jazz and feel at home at the Village Vanguard or playing on the street. The band features members New Orleans band the Loose Marbles and alumni of Stephane Wrembel’s Hot Club of NY. With Ben Polcer, Trumpet; Patrick Harison, Accordion; Jared Engel, Banjo; David Langlois, Washboard and Peter Ford, Washtub bass.

Game Play 2011 @ THE BRICK.
July 7 – 31, 2011

A Celebration of Video Game Performance Art

Now in its 3rd year, the video game performance festival continues in what Seth Schiesel of the New York Times called “the most ambitious effort I know of to fuse the techniques and live presentation of theater with the themes, structures and technology of interactive electronic entertainment.” See the media of stage and game collide in the most unexpected and surprising ways.

Game Play explores the collision of technology, theater, performance art, and video game culture by staging the collaborative work of performance and media artists across the digital spectrum.

See Game Play’s lineups for 2009 and 2010!


Music in the Garden featuring So Percussion

Sunday, July 10, 2011 – 3:00pm

So Percussion (Eric Beach, Josh Quillen, Adam Sliwinski, and Jason Treuting) will join with Grey McMurray on guitar to perform work-in-progress excerpts from their next major theatrical work. A celebration of diversity, community, and collaboration, this project is an exploration of their outermost artistic boundaries, as well as a re-examination of comfort zones.

For more information about So Percussion, see www.sopercussion.com.

Music in the Garden is presented through partnership with Bang on a Can

HOSPITAL 2011 @ AXIS THEATER

Tickets & Info: http://www.axiscompany.org/mainstage.htm

Axis Company’s episodic play Hospital, about the interior life of a person in a terminal coma, is something of a signature for the company, which has produced a new installment of the drama nearly every year since 1997. Conceived, written and directed by Randy Sharp the show is a summer downtown phenomenon beloved for its balance of horror, humor, and weirdness. The company will present the 11th production in the series July 8 – August 20.

While most audience members return to see multiple, if not all four, parts of the summer’s production, each episode is a self-contained short play that can be seen in isolation. The brief premise film that begins each year’s production—depicting the event that brought on the coma—is shown at the beginning of each performance.

Hunter/Gatherer
July 9 – August, 7, 2011.
Opening reception July 9, 2011; 7 – 10pm.
The Booklyn Art Gallery is pleased to present Hunter/Gatherer, featuring works by Evan Robarts, Jason Kachadourian, Jessica Williams, Jon Bocksel and Scott Meyers.
Hunter/Gatherer
includes artists with the common practice of borrowing both aesthetic inspirations and found objects from their local surroundings. These artists accumulate visual, physical, and conceptual source material from everyday encounters and observations. They manipulate materials and appropriate techniques from discarded objects, sign-painting and murals, printed ephemera, and urban architecture. While each artist has their own unique approach to collecting and manipulating, their work evokes similar appreciations for the found and overlooked. With their work combined, Hunter/Gatherer creates a personal map of the city they share and the scenery they encounter. The viewer is confronted by these recognizable, yet often ignored images and encouraged to take a second look when walking down the street.

Machinathumb2

LA MACCHINA AMMAZZACATTIVI @ SPECTACLE
Sat, July 9: 5:00pm
 

Minor but pleasing Rossellini, set in a small town in Southern Italy thrown into a tizzy by the machinations of a mysterious old man. Saint or devil, he endows a camera with the power not merely to kill people, but to ferret out sources of wealth. Cue for a flurry of treachery and greed, all casually swept under the carpet in a final pirouette. The neo-realist techniques don’t always mix too comfortably with the fantasy, making it an Ealing comedy with an edifying bent.

… anticipates with remarkable prescience the conceits of Godard and others about photography in the 60’s” — Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

 

DAY IN PICTURES
is saxophonist and clarinetist Matt Bauder’’s latest band. Downbeat Magazine described the recent debut album as “modern jazz of a half-century past, with an instrumetal line-up and compositions that echoes classic efforts from Prestige, Columbia and Blue Note catalogs with nary a whiff of condescencion or dabbling.” With Matt Bauder – Tenor Saxophone, Clarinet; Justin Walter – Trumpet; Kris Davis – Piano; Jason Ajemian – Bass and Chad Taylor – Drums.
July 9th, 2011, 5pm
Barbes
376 9th St
Brooklyn, NY 11215
$ Donation

Rubulad Presents on Saturday July 9, 2011:

Brooklyn
A ^ Odyssey! In which our heroes are buffeted by storms on the high seas of Kings County, lured by the sweet siren singers of East Williamsburg and menaced by Mayor Mike’s minotaurs, landing in a sweet loft space in Greenpoint on our way home. (READ MORE)


Saturday, July 9th. Night of Poetry and Music @ CAFE ORWELL.

Blaise Siwula/Erika Dagnino
www.erikadagnino.it
http://www.blaisesiwula.com/

Valerie Kuehne/April Elizabeth Pierce.
New Compositions for poet and cellist.
http://www.soundcloud.com/zolaleverkuhn

Ken Silverman is bringing in a couple of poets, he tells me.
http://www.kensilvermanguitarandstrings.com/

Brooklyn County Fair Summerfest DAY 2011 at Urban Meadow
Saturday, July 9
Show starts at 12:00
$10 cover
BUY TICKETS

This seasonal festival is back with all new acts celebrating Brooklyn’s diverse country music scene. Whether you like country, bluegrass, Americana, cow-punk, or rockabilly, this is the scene for you!

SummerFest at Urban Meadow
12:00 – Dirt Floor Revue
12:30 – Mini Max Band
1:00 – Kamara Thomas
1:30 – Big Slyde
2:00 – The Newton Gang
2:30 – The Whiskey Boys
3:00 – I’ll Be John Brown
3:30 – Maynard and The Musties
4:00 – Jack Grace Band
4:30 – Ramblin’ Andy and The See Ya Laters
5:00 – Trailer Radio
5:30 – The Dustbusters
6:00 – Hans Chew

Sponsored by Sixpoint Craft Ales, Jalopy Theatre, BrooklynCountry.com

THEATER: Frazer Hines: The Time Traveling Scot
July 8
We are very excited to announce that the next Who York Event will feature one of the Doctor’s most popular companions: Mr. Frazer Hines!!!

Who York is delighted to welcome Frazer to New York City, to perform his one man show – “The Time Traveling Scot”. There will also be a short Q&A, hosted by Ken Deep, from Doctor Who Podshock,, an autograph session (see details below) and possibly a surprise or two – as I hope you have come to expect from our previous SOLD OUT Who York events!!!

We have room for around 100 people in total, and seating will be first come first served in this small theatre. Mingling will still be possible in the lounge at the theatre, and in the auditorium itself before and after the show, making this a more intimate event than most conventions you may have attended.

MORE:
THE MEDICINE BAG @Maccarone Gallery.
Ken Vandermark, Steve Swell, Sean Conly and Chad Taylor @ THE STONE.
Los Lobos with Hello Seahorse! and Zigmat @ CELEBRATE BROOKLYN! @ Prospect Park Bandshell
BabySkinGlove’s Butoh Auction @Culture Fix.
E.S.P. TV at Silvershed @Sat. July 9, 8pm-12am

KAL SPELLETICH: Where’s My Jetpack?! @Jack Hanley.
Ted Leo + the Pharmacists, w/ Screaming Females! @Seaport Music Fest.
BOOGALOO W/SPANGLISH FLY @NUBLU.
FROLIC@CENTRAL PARK.

COMING UP NEXT WEEK!

SUPERCODA AND THE 22 MAGAZINE PRESENT:
PABLO MALAURIE, JULY 14th
CAFE ORWELL 7pm

Excited to announce this one. Pablo Malaurie’s voice is of the angels, and he’s come all the way from Argentina to play for you. It’s going to be beautiful, and glorious, and fun. Pablo has been widely praised for his fusion style (South American and Japanese in some cases), opened for Devandra Banhart and recently was a part of Catalin Mitulescu’s film “Loverboy.” He’s making the rounds in NY for the next couple days and we’re really pleased to have him.

Come help support not only our effort to see Volume II of The 22 Magazine in PRINT but also witness the  brainchild of Valerie Kuehne, i.e. Supercoda @ Cafe Orwell, the gorgeous spectacle that goes on nearly every  night (when does Valerie sleep?!?) and allows you to witness sounds that are otherworldly and stunning. Now, please watch/listen to the gorgeous song below.

PS- This show will be also be one of the first opportunities to be part of The 22’s Artist’s Open Forum. Have a question, concern, or problem as an artist? This is where we can help. We’ll be passing out signup sheets allowing you to let us know what is concerning you as artists, writers, and musicians and will address those concerns in our next meeting or on the blog. More info about what this all about at the show.

THE WEEK: JULY 5th-8th.

Khaïra Arby and her Band and The Mast ‘CD Release Show’

Thu., July 07, 2011 / 6:30 PM

Khaïra Arby and her Band
Khaïra Arby (pronounced: Hī-ra Arbē), the Nightingale of the North, born in the village of Abaradjou in the Sahara Desert north of Timbuktu. Khaira’s parents came from different ethnic backgrounds, mother Songhai and father Berber. You can hear these cultures in her music; she sings in several languages. The instrumentation and rhythms are just as varied with electric guitar and bass, calabash, ngoni, traditional violin, and percussion creating a complex mixture of sound and structure. Some people compare the effect to the rhythms of the camel caravans crossing the Sahara.

The Brooklyn-based duo The Mast creates a propulsive and expansive sound featuring Haale’s layered, undulating vocals and hypnotic electric guitar riffs dancing with Matt Kilmer’s polyrhythmic drumming.

READ A REVIEW FROM MATT MOWATT.

FREE TICKETS: https://the22magazine.wordpress.com/2011/06/22/free-tickets-to-khaira-arbymast-show-le-poisson-rouge/

Fernando Hereñu AKA PulpoCorporate @TACHE GALLERY.

Reception:
Thursday July 7th, 6-9pm

Exhibition
July 7th – August 2nd 2011

Tache Gallery Opening Exhibition of Fernando Hereñú AKA Pulpo
“HIDDEN DRAWINGS”

Exhibition July 7 – 2011

” The argentinean artist Pulpo has been part of the Latin American creative scene for many years.
With his series, ‘Hidden Drawings’, Pulpo’s work is focused on the Childhood Trauma & Hidden Emotion

Fernando Hereñu makes some amazingly bizarre drawings, the kinds that make you feel uncomfortable and inspired at the same time. ”

www.pulpocorporate.tumblr.com
www.tachegallery.com

ARTIST PROFILE INFORMATION
www.flickr.com/people/pulpocorporate/


Laura Ball: Animus @ MORGAN LEHMAN. July 7 – August 19, 2011

The Ladybug Transistor @KNITTING FACTORY
The Beets, James Ausfahrt (of Love Is All)

Knitting Factory Brooklyn

Wed, July 6, 2011
Doors: 7:30 PM / Show: 8:30 PM
$12.00

Since the 1990s, the Ladybug Transistor has created formalist pop-rock albums with a dreamy, articulate sound that spans decades and genres. Anchored by Gary Olson’s organizing vision and restrained baritone, their music boasts intricate arrangements and soaring melodies that are at once modern and timeless.

This band’s narrative holds a rich history of heartfelt collaboration, tireless devotion, quiet and outspoken romance, new arrivals, unexpected departures, achy break-ups, and unspeakable loss. They have become agile at adjustment.

In 2007, the untimely passing of their beloved drummer San Fadyl left members Olson, Kyle Forester, and Julia Rydholm at an unimaginable loss, struggling with a prevailing sense of “What now?” At a time where moving forward felt possibly impossible, the band quietly gathered new recruits (Mark Dzula, Eric Farber, Michael O’Neill) and embarked on writing a new album with the memory of San squarely in mind.

The resulting effort is their forthcoming release Clutching Stems-a lush collection of potent refrains and brought-to-one’s-knees ballads. Set to an invigorated soundtrack of wave-pop arrangements, the songs detail stories of humbling heartbreak, profound longing, undoing distress, nagging regret, and coming-of-age awakenings. Olson’s lyrics express an overarching search to find one’s voice in the face of moments that knock the wind and words right out of a person.

This new line-up has found a distinct voice that honors diverse influences and the band’s own precedent sound. Clutching Stems assuredly underlines that while love can tear things apart, it can also capably mend them back together once again.

The Weekend: June 10-12.


FIGMENT ON GOVERNOR’S ISLAND

JUNE 10-12

FIGMENT is a forum for the creation and display of participatory and interactive art by emerging artists across disciplines. FIGMENT began in July 2007 as a free, one-day participatory arts event on Governors Island in New York Harbor with over 2,600 participants. Since then, FIGMENT has grown significantly each year—in number of projects, duration, participants, volunteers, fundraising capability, exhibitions, locations, overall level of commitment and participation, and public support. (READ MORE.)
FULL LISTING OF EVENTS.

An Interview with Deborah Simon.

Deborah in the studio with her sculptures. ©2011 The 22 Magazine

This past Friday, I paid a visit to Deborah Simon who has an upcoming show at NY Studio Gallery‘s LZ Project Space opening this Friday, May 20th. Deborah has been a painter and sculptor for several years now and will be part of the Sculpture Space residency  in Utica, this coming October and November. She has worked at the Bronx Zoo building habitats and “intellectual toys” for the animals, and her work reflects the understanding of the dual nature of man-made versus natural environments and the drawbacks and necessity of both. Her sculpture’s present a strange encounter and cause the viewer to approach the animal in an unusual and raw manner, suggesting a reevaluation of the nature of human and animal interaction.

We truly appreciate her taking the time to talk about her work and upcoming show.

LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW

The 22 Magazine: You worked at the Bronx Zoo correct? Can you tell us a little about what you did there?

Deborah Simon: Sure, I did some design work. It was everything from giving exhibits face lifts to mural work, to sometimes just flat out designing and building exhibits. [I also built] intellectual toys for the animals. With that you have to make everything look natural. So [you have to make a] tiger toy that looks [for example] like a rotten piece of wood. It was one of those oddball weird request situations, keepers would come and say we need hummingbird feeders made out of XY and Z and we’d have to figure how to make them look natural.

The 22: How did you get into that kind of work? Did you study design in school or elsewhere?

DS: No, I’ve got a fine arts background. [I studied at] San Francisco Art Institute, which prepares you for nothing but making conceptual art. I just happened to have a realistic bent to what I do, which was thoroughly discouraged but…
I started working as a muralist and then the zoo had an ad in the paper. I replied to it and got hired. It’s one of those jobs where the guy who runs the department is fantastic, and he just expects that you need a lot of on the job training. You need to be able to weld, you need to be able to fiberglass, you need to be able to do some basic carpentry. There are just so many skills that no one person is going to have them all. They do invest in teaching you quite a bit [so], I learned a lot, and it all goes back into what I do.

The 22: In regards to your artists statement, which talks a little about the animal confronting the viewer in an unrestricted environment, did working at the zoo conflict with ideas of how animals should be treated in any way?

DS: I think it’s a conflict a lot of the people who work at the zoo have, because everyone who works there more or less loves animals. We all have multiple animals, we are deeply concerned about animal welfare. Some of the holding areas are very old and not that great. Some of the animals are permanently on medications because [there is] not the best ventilation but, on the other hand, you can’t just let them go. [I believe] Finland ran into this problem. They decided it was cruel and inhumane to keep this baboon exhibit. They decided it was inhumane to keep more tropical animals in Finland, but they couldn’t get rid of them because they breed really well and every zoo has a ton of them. So, they were going to euthanize them but the public had a fit and they had to keep them. So, now they have these unhappy baboons; animals that are obviously not doing well, but there are no other options for them. [I think] a lot of the people [that work at the zoo] go through this. [They think] these animals didn’t ask for this, they didn’t want to become ambassadors of their species, but on the other hand sometimes when your standing and watching the public watch these animals and they suddenly make this connection to the human traits of the animals you really hope it does something. They are suddenly more aware of them and, you think, I hope this means that it will translate into something, maybe [that wouldn’t be there] if they hadn’t seen it. Then again, zoo animals they don’t behave like wild animals, they have three meals a day, they sleep all day. [In the end] it’s a lot of mixed emotions.

The 22: A lot of your animals actually are puppets or look a lot like traditional marionettes. Stylistically how did you decide this was how you were going to build?

DS: It’s weird because I have this totally anal goal to be as accurate as humanly possibly, but I’m always reminding myself it’s art, not taxidermy. I was living in India for a while and India is a very sculpture oriented place. I had been painting for years and years at that point, and maybe it was just being around so much sculpture. I was home in the states and one day I just thought, what would happen if I make sculpted animals with fake fur? The hyena was the first one. I found [the hyena’s fur] in the bargain bin and I thought, this looks just like spotted hyena fur, no wonder it’s on sale. I brought back Sculpy and fur and whatever else I thought I wouldn’t be able to get in India, and just started working. I was originally thinking of porcelain dolls-[with] the hard heads and the soft body. I was thinking more along the lines of what would it be like to make these things so they look like creeped out porcelain dolls, but they actually ended up a little but more like [weird] taxidermy.

Deborah working in her studio. photo ©2011 Ted Szczepanski

The 22: They seem to have this really human quality, a very aggressive straight on gaze…

DS:I feel even though animals are a really popular subject right now, it’s always animal as metaphor or animal as parable. They play the role of an odalisque and they don’t confront the viewer. They are a stand in for history, they’re a stand in for human behavior, but they are never just themselves, and when they are themselves it’s more kitschy animal art. I want it to be as if you were walking into their space. It’s kind of that feeling when you out in the woods or hiking, or even in Central Park [where] it tends to be a bird of prey, a hawk or something, and you have that instant where they look at you, and you look at them, and you have no idea what’s going to go on. Especially if it’s big enough to hurt you. Then it’s this totally different interaction than the zoo or anything else. Your walking into their space, and they are psychologically dominating it. The sculptures themselves are going to be hung so your going to have to walk around them. They force you to move around them instead of being on the walls or giving a pathway.

The 22: Can you tell me a little about Coyote Pursue’s puppet project?

DS: It was a pretty amazing experience. Collaborating was new to me but Matt Reeck is a good friend and amazing to work with. We shored up each others strengths and weaknesses really well. I would never have been able to direct something like that. I think in the future I may do more puppetry but do it so it’s video.

Coyote Pursues, 2010. photo courtesy of St. Ann's Warehouse

 The 22: Is there a difference between building the puppets versus building the sculptures? Is that something you had to learn?

DS: Yes. St. Ann’s puppet lab is a nine month program so they are a huge resource, but it took me forever just to figure how to walk them. It took me two months just to build one, to actually physically construct it so that it moved properly. Once I got the basic structure it took me weeks to figure out how to string it, and that’s one of the times the lab was great. I brought them in and said I don’t know what to do, and one of the guys [showed me], and it was done. It was wonderful.

The 22: The piece itself was about a world where humans are gone, and coyotes are the only ones left right?

DS: [Matt Reeck] is a wonderful poet and he gave me a book of his poetry and asked me to illustrate it. At the time I was just feeling like, I don’t want to paint anything, and I don’t want to sketch.
[But] I was thinking [the poetry] would be perfect to do a puppet show with, and so we said what the hell, we’ll write a puppet lab. We threw it together in two weeks, and we were really surprised we got in. Originally we had taken three of his poems, more short prose really, and the one we both had a very clear vision-that was the same vision-was [the coyote] one. We started building and time started ticking by, and we realized the other two we’re never going to make it, and that we wouldn’t have time [to perform more than one]. You only got twenty minutes tops to perform. So, we decided just to focus on the coyotes, and it was really based on his writing, and [the idea of] not using the animals as parables but to be really Darwinian about it. What would a coyote really be doing if they were wandering around in this world with nothing really left. We were thinking of it as The Road but with coyotes.

The 22: Did you do a cover for The Beastie Boys [Intergalatic]?

DS: I had actually done the paintings and they ended up on the cover. The paintings were actually in the small works show at NYU and Mike D’s wife  bought them. So, she came over to my studio and she’s chatting and we’re having this very nice conversation, and she keeps talking about her husband’s band and so I’m thinking….ok, band whatever and being polite, I ask oh what band is your husband in? And she’s says, The Beastie Boys, and at that point I’m immediately intimidated. So about six months later, they called to see if it was ok with me if they used it as an album cover and I just thought….ooook, twist my arm. It was just this little freak thing, they were just these little freak paintings, that I wasn’t planning to do as a body of work or anything.

Memento mori: Ocelot and ocelot skeleton, oil on wood, 68” w x 36” h, 2001

The 22: What about the memento mori series paintings? Can you talk a little about what this series means to you and why you decided to do it?

DS: I think in that series I’d been reading a lot about evolution. I was thinking about how death influences life. I was thinking about a Darwinian perspective, you have these animals with these constant pressures, and it’s survival of the fittest but also thinking about viewing what human’s do in the world [destruction and pollution] as unnatural, but it is natural because we are part of the world and this is part of what we do. Animals routinely destroy their environments, but they don’t do it in the same numbers that we do. Elephants constantly  trash environments and have to move on, but there are so few of them, they aren’t ruining Africa or Asia-we sort of beat them to it. I guess I was thinking about that simple pressure and interaction, and how some of your stiffest competition is from your species. You know species always have more children than your going to need. You really only need a one to one replacement and chances are that’s all your going to get if your lucky.

Tiny Resistors/Cleon Peterson/Tat Ito/Exit Art/Rosmarie Fiore

Undead Jazz presents: Todd Sickafoose’s Tiny Resistors and Mary Halvorson Trio
@ LE POISSON ROUGE

$15 GA
$10 w/ Student ID

This is a first-come, first-served partially seated event. Seating is limited and not guaranteed; please arrive early.

Search & Restore and BoomCollective are proud to present another even of Undead Jazz, featuring two of our favorite groups. It is going to be unreal. Todd’s band will include the magnificent Andrew Bird on violin, and the rest of the cast of characters are listed below. GET ‘EM!

TODD SICKAFOOSE’S TINY RESISTORS:
John Ellis (sax & clarinet)
Alan Ferber (trombone)
Andrew Bird (violin & looping)
Steve Cardenas (guitar)
Jonathan Goldberger (guitar)
Ted Poor (drums & percussion)
Todd Sickafoose (bass & piano)

MARY HALVORSON TRIO:
Mary Halvorson (guitar)
John Hebert (bass)
Ches Smith (drums)

10PM – Bassist/composer Todd Sickafoose’s band is a marvel of musical cross-breeding, pairing indie rock muscle and whimsy with the extended forms, timbres, and sophistication of a jazz orchestra. Their newest recording “Tiny Resistors” (Cryptogramophone) has been called “thoroughly original, endlessly creative…one of the year’s most compelling listens” (JazzTimes), “stunningly brilliant…a modern jazz masterpiece” (Bassplayer), and “a one-disc explanation of why today’s Brooklyn jazz scene is so exciting” (HotHouse). A Bay Area native, Sickafoose’s penchant for genre-bending may or may not be attributible to a classical upbringing, CalArts years studying bass with Charlie Haden, or the last seven years with folk hero Ani DiFranco, performing as a duo and quartet everywhere from punk clubs to Carnegie Hall. Since 2005, he’s been active in New York, performing with a ton of innovative folks including Jenny Scheinman, Ron Miles, Nels Cline, Allison Miller and Myra Melford. For tonight’s special performance, Tiny Resistors, which features saxophonist John Ellis, trombonist Alan Ferber, guitarists Steve Cardenas and Jonathan Goldberger, and drummer Ted Poor, will be joined by special guest violinist (and whistler) Andrew Bird. (READ MORE.)

Cleon Peterson: White Flag &  Tat Ito: Memento Mori @ Joshua Liner
 May 17 to June 11, 2011
MAP 

Joshua Liner Gallery is pleased to present White Flag, an exhibition of new paintings by the Los Angeles-based artist Cleon Peterson. This is Peterson’s first solo show at the gallery.

If the title of this new body of work suggests a surrender, it’s not the conventional sort. Known for his depictions of graphic violence and depravity, Peterson’s dystopian art rips the lid off of accepted social decorum to unleash aggression and other pent-up impulses. As figures torture, maim, cut, and abuse one another, a surrender to the worst in humanity is staged on the surfaces of the artist’s work—here, it can be safely, cathartically, and even aesthetically enacted. (READ MORE.)

Joshua Liner Gallery is pleased to present Memento Mori, an exhibition of new paintings by the New York-based artist Tat Ito. This occasion marks Ito’s solo debut in New York, and is his fourth appearance in shows at the gallery.

Tat Ito was born and raised in Japan, but he later made his art studies in the United States. Consequently, the artist and his paintings are a dynamic confluence of East and West, traditional and contemporary. The poetic analogy of “oil on water” describes Ito’s approach to both imagery and cultural references; in his vibrantly colored work, traditional Japanese aesthetics are a foundation upon which floats a contemporary (i.e., Western-influenced) viewpoint. Like a skim of oil on water, the beautiful, reflective surfaces of his paintings fascinate viewers. These top layers never mix but, rather, are presented in dialogue with the substance beneath. (READ MORE.)


Cao Fei: Play Time @ LOMBARD FRIED
May 18- June 25, 2011
Mat 12 6:00pm-8:00pm

Play Time by Cao Fei, one of the key artists of the new generation emerging from Mainland China, will open at Lombard Freid Projects on Wednesday May 18th 2011.

For her fourth solo exhibition at Lombard Freid, Cao Fei’s recent exploration into the theme of “play” has multiple connotations; Play Time is layered with ambiguities. Does it relish a time of game planning and exhilaration, or an onstage performance? This exhibition leaves viewers with no clear-cut answers, but rather with ideas and associations of different dimensions.

Following her powerful and widely influential RMB City Series (2008-2011), Play Time returns to Cao Fei’s previous interest in the convergence of fantasy and reality and premieres her latest works. She continues to utilize different types of media including video, photography and sculptural installations that evoke childhood games, story telling and TV programs that have a profound influence on children. (READ MORE.)

EXIT ART: OUTER SPACE BENEFIT AUCTION
Wednesday, May 18, 7:30-9:30PM at EXIT ART / LIVE AUCTION 8:15PM

475 10th Ave at 36th Street
CLICK HERE  TO VIEW AUCTION CATALOGUE

CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS

PRISKA C. JUSCHKA FINE ART
Thursday, May 19, 6 – 9 PM
Priska C. Juschka Fine Art is pleased to present Artificiere, Rosemarie Fiore’s second solo exhibition at the gallery. Fiore continues her practice of using fireworks as her sole medium to create works on paper and, most recently in addition, glass sculptures by uniquely utilizing fireworks and smoke bombs for her work and compositions. By referring to the Italian word artificiere for ‘pyrotechnician,’ Fiore points out that the first gunpowder and fireworks specialists were considered artful masters of a rare trade. Ars the Latin noun for ‘art and skill’ and ficere or facere the Latin verbs for ‘creating and making’ extrapolates Fiore’s intent. “I control my mark making as much as I can. I keep in mind that it is a balance between chaos and control and that too much control suffocates the work.” (READ MORE.)

Amy Cutler/Hiromi Umeda/The Repurposed Library/Artist Talk (Center for Book Arts)/NYAA MFA SHOW

AMY CUTLER @SPOONBILL & SUGAR TOWN.

On Monday, May 16th, beginning at 7 pm there will be an opportunity to meet the wonderful artist, Amy Cutler. She will be in the house at Spoonbill Books to sign her new book, Turtle Fur. We look forward to your dropping by.

During the past decade, Amy Cutler (*1974 in Poughkeepsie, New York) has become internationally known for exquisitely detailed narrative works of art. Set in a richly imagined universe, created through a pastiche of memories, observations and insights, they are populated mostly by women engaged in enigmatic tasks and impossible situations: tigers are mended and restriped; figures emerge from the rocky crags of a fjord.

With faces that are both resolute and introspective, Cutler’s women symbolize the emotional complexities of real life situations. This publication will premiere new paintings, drawings, and prints, also including a selection of earlier works and a special section devoted to Alterations, a sculpture installation created for the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid.

Amy Cutler is represented by Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects, New York.

Hiromi Umeda @OUCHI GALLERY.

The Repurposed Library, a Book-Art Workshop with Lisa Occhipinti
126 Crosby Street, New York, NY

The Repurposed Library by designer and mixed media artist Lisa Occhipinti, is a collection of DIY projects that utilize every imaginable part of a book—from hardback cover to individual pages—to create new art objects and practical items for the home. Bibliophiles, DIY enthusiasts, design aficionados, and creative dabblers will find inspiration in the book’s unique art-meets-craft aesthetic. Often using no more than a craft knife, glue, and a little ingenuity, Occhipinti demonstrates how “orphaned” books can become home décor accessories, such as wreaths and vases, as well as functional items, such as shelves, storage boxes, and clocks. This event is free, but $20 buys you a copy of Lisa’s new book, an old book to make art from, instructions and use of craft supplies. Guests of all ages are welcome. Only a love of books is required!

Monday, May 16, 2011 at 7:00 PM
Bookstore Cafe
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Artist Talk: 2010 Artists in Residence @ Center for Book Arts

Please join us for an artist talk featuring Tal Halpern, Wayne Hodge, Katarina Jerinic, Jennie C. Jones, and Angie Waller in conjunction with their exhibition featuring new work produced here at the Center during their 2010 residency. These New York-based emerging artists were offered space, time and support to explore the production and exhibition of artist’s books and related work in year-long residencies.

Suggested Admission: $5 members / $10 non-members
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NYAA MFA SHOW: UNCHARTED the 2011 MFA Thesis Exhibition

May 17 – May 27, 2011
On view daily 2 – 7 pm,
CLOSED May 20
Opening Reception May 16, 6 – 8 pm
New York, NY. The New York Academy of Art is pleased to present UNCHARTED, a group exhibition featuring original paintings, drawings, sculpture and prints by sixty talented emerging artists.
Immersed for two years in an intensive learning environment that combines rigorous skills and conceptual training, these MFA candidates plumbed the depths of a time-honored artistic language from which they are creating innumerable distinct dialects. The 2011 graduates of the New York Academy of Art reveal that they are sixty individuals striding sure-footed onto an entirely contemporary landscape.
A catalogue will be available, featuring an essay by Donald Kuspit.

Torben Giehler/ALI SMITH/Road Trip/Jakob Kolding/DREAMWEAPON/Zap/PAF/Posters of Fortune/Society

Leo Koenig Inc. is pleased to announce the fifth solo exhibition of new paintings by Torben Giehler. Giehler is known for his geometric abstractions, influenced by futuristic universes, and finished with mathematical precision. In a departure from the vibrant color palette and electrified vortex of his previous paintings, these new works extend a zen-like calm, alchemically fusing the synapses of the human brain to the grids and networks of digitized technology. (READ MORE.)

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