The 22 Playlist #3 (Threefifty), August 31, 2012.

We’ve got a special playlist this week, curated by and dedicated to the sonorous sounds of Threefifty and friends. Threefifty is currently trying to raise money for their third album and today is the last day to donate! Although they’ve reached a goal of around $2200, they need more like $7000 to create something truly spectacular. They’ve called on friends who are stellar musicians to help build this playlist. Ranging from the building block strings of Redhooker, to the randomized perfection of Dither, to the stripped down tones of Runaway Dorothy, each of these bands is special not only musically but as avid supporters, friends, brothers, and lovers of Threefifty. This playlist is truly amazing, please take a listen and HELP SUPPORT!

DONATE LINK: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/threefifty/collapses

To check out artist’s websites, video and to buy tracks please visit the single tracks here.

SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: Phantom Limb’s “69˚S.” – The Final Stage


About this project

WATCH THE VIDEO

DONATE NOW!

Phantom Limb has been at work on 69˚S. (formerly known as The Shackleton Project) for over three years now and the world premiere is just around the corner.

This piece has taken Erik and Jessica to Antarctica, Australia and beyond and for the final developmental stage, the entire company travels to Groningen, Netherlands where their unparalleled vision for the stage premieres in August at Holland’s Noorderzon Festival.  The Grand Theatre in Groningen has been working away for the past 6 months making a 21’ hydraulic puppet shipwreck that collapses in three phases, a flaming life-size skeleton puppet and our entire wardrobe for the show.

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Torben Giehler/ALI SMITH/Road Trip/Jakob Kolding/DREAMWEAPON/Zap/PAF/Posters of Fortune/Society

Leo Koenig Inc. is pleased to announce the fifth solo exhibition of new paintings by Torben Giehler. Giehler is known for his geometric abstractions, influenced by futuristic universes, and finished with mathematical precision. In a departure from the vibrant color palette and electrified vortex of his previous paintings, these new works extend a zen-like calm, alchemically fusing the synapses of the human brain to the grids and networks of digitized technology. (READ MORE.)

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Eugene Von Bruenchenhein @ Fleisher/Ollman.

As part of the group show:

the usefulness of useless things

Michel Auder
Guy de Cointet
Janette Laverrière
Stefanie Victor
Eugene Von Bruenchenhein

Curated by Jonathan Berger
March 31 through April 30, 2011
Opening reception: Thursday, March 31, 6–8pm

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (1910-1983, lived and worked in Milwaukee)

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Untitled (VB-c-15, blue Closed Top Vessel), n.d., painted clay, 9 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches

Eugene von Bruenchenhein was born in 1910 in Marinette, Wisconsin. As an child, he relocated with his family to Milwaukee, where he lived and worked producing photographs, paintings, sculpture, and writing up until his death in 1983. In his late twenties, Von Bruenchenhein became obsessed with botany and horticulture, interests that would develop throughout his life. These interests, alongside an affinity for the mystical, were a driving influence on the ceramic vessels he created beginning around 1960.

To produce the vessels, Von Bruenchenhein mixed his own clay dug from his property and nearby construction sites. He first sculpted hundreds of tiny individual leaves, all of which were later attached to one another to form the finished piece. The structures were baked or “fired” in a coal burning stove in the parlor used to heat his home, and finally painted with whatever unwanted or discarded paints he could gather from local stores.

The identity of the vessels and their intended function remains elusive. There are credible theories that the aesthetics were informed by an awareness of Victorian ceramics and the royal ornamentation of ancient Greece. Von Bruenchenhein himself writes about the works at times as “sensor pots,” saying that they “may be used for dry flowers, or for incense burners.” However, he also states that ultimately, “There was no model for any of them…all were made for love of creation.” As objects, these vessels command a great deal of presence, a presence only amplified when considering the care, investment, and belief that Von Bruenchenhein embedded in them. Any initial associations with mundane use or decoration are challenged by their mysterious nature and the presumably profound significance they had in Von Bruenchenhein’s lexicon.

SEE MORE WORK HERE, AND MORE SCULPTURE HERE.